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Courageous mother left her lower legs amputated due to sepsis after the birth of her stillborn son

A brave mother left her lower legs amputated due to sepsis after a life-threatening birth in which she gave birth to her stillborn baby.

Callie Colwick, 30, from McKinney, Texas, suffered from placenta accreta while pregnant with her son Quinn, a rare serious condition with major complications.

After 15 weeks, she and her husband Kevin, 30, were told that Quinn could be born at any time and that he tragically would not survive the birth.

Two weeks later, in December 2016, Mrs. Colwick was induced and gave birth to Quinn while she was unconscious, tragically stillborn and weighing only half a pound.

During the traumatic birth, Mrs. Colwick bled heavily and her blood pressure dropped drastically, called septic shock.

She then developed deadly sepsis, which closes her kidneys and lungs. She got a living, while Mr. Colwick was told to prepare for the worst.

Two months later, doctors had no choice but to amputate both legs of Mrs. Colwick, her left thumb and forefinger because the blood could not reach them.

Her inside was ‘black and dead’, which led to the removal of her womb. Mrs. Colwick was fed through a tube and needed skin grafts on her back because of some time in a hospital bed.

Mrs. Colwick spent nearly two years in various hospitals, including rehabilitation, and eventually returned to her daughter, Kenzi, in March 2018.

Her health insurance refused to cover the $ 11,000 (£ 8,555) adapted wheelchair she needed to move freely, and the money was collected by an inspired stranger.

After 15 weeks of pregnancy, Callie Colwick, 30, from McKinney, Texas, and her husband Kevin, 30 (pictured together) were told that their son Quinn would not survive the birth

After 15 weeks of pregnancy, Callie Colwick, 30, from McKinney, Texas, and her husband Kevin, 30 (pictured together) were told that their son Quinn would not survive the birth

Mrs. Colwick's lower legs were amputated (photo) because of sepsis after the life-threatening birth, giving birth to still-born Quinn. She is pictured with Mr Colwick and their daughter, Kenzi. Her hair was removed while she was in the hospital

Mrs. Colwick's lower legs were amputated (photo) because of sepsis after the life-threatening birth, giving birth to still-born Quinn. She is pictured with Mr Colwick and their daughter, Kenzi. Her hair was removed while she was in the hospital

Mrs. Colwick’s lower legs were amputated (photo) because of sepsis after the life-threatening birth, giving birth to still-born Quinn. She is pictured with Mr Colwick and their daughter, Kenzi. Her hair was removed while she was in the hospital

Mrs. Colwick suffered from placenta accreta while pregnant with her son Quinn, a serious condition with major complications. She is recently shown being held by her husband

Mrs. Colwick suffered from placenta accreta while pregnant with her son Quinn, a serious condition with major complications. She is recently shown being held by her husband

Mrs. Colwick suffered from placenta accreta while pregnant with her son Quinn, a serious condition with major complications. She is recently shown being held by her husband

Mrs. Colwick developed deadly sepsis, which closes her kidneys and lungs. She got a living, while Mr. Colwick was told to prepare for the worst

Mrs. Colwick developed deadly sepsis, which closes her kidneys and lungs. She got a living, while Mr. Colwick was told to prepare for the worst

Mrs. Colwick developed deadly sepsis, which closes her kidneys and lungs. She got a living, while Mr. Colwick was told to prepare for the worst

Mrs. Colwick, a graphic designer, and her husband, a web developer, were delighted to discover that they were pregnant with their second child in November 2016.

But when Mrs. Colwick began to experience heavy bleeding at work when she was 15 weeks pregnant, she went to the hospital.

“I had a slight bleed from day one,” Mrs. Colwick said. “But what made me go to the doctor was the heavy abdominal bleeding.

“I passed blood clots. I was working to go to a meeting and I felt this flow of fluid – my pants were soaked with blood. ”

Mrs Colwick was diagnosed with placenta accreta, which is when the placenta – the organ that provides nutrients and other support for a developing fetus – adheres too deeply to the uterine wall.

The main major complication is that the placenta cannot normally give birth after the birth of the baby and attempts to remove the placenta can lead to heavy bleeding.

Risks for the baby are premature birth. If there are early, heavy bleeding, the birth may have to take place very early because the mother may become unstable.

Doctors told Mrs. Colwick that Quinn tragically would not survive birth at such a young age – 17 weeks of pregnancy.

Mrs. and Mr. Colwick on their wedding day in 2011

Mrs. and Mr. Colwick on their wedding day in 2011

Mrs. Colwick before she lost her lower legs

Mrs. Colwick before she lost her lower legs

Mrs. Colwick, a graphic designer, and her husband, a web developer, were delighted to discover that they were pregnant with their second child in November 2016

Speaking of her work, Mrs. Colwick said: “I faded into and out of consciousness. I did not respond, my eyes rolled to the back of my head and I burned up ‘

WHAT IS PLACENTA ACCRETA AND HOW COMMON IS IT?

During pregnancy, a woman’s placenta attaches itself to her uterine wall and she loosens after delivery.

Placenta accreta is a serious pregnancy complication where the placenta attaches too deeply into the uterine wall.

This ensures that part or all of the placenta remains firmly attached to the womb during delivery.

Sometimes a woman’s placenta will attach itself so deeply into the womb that it attaches itself to the womb, called placenta increta. It can even go through the uterine wall and into another organ, such as the bladder, called placenta percreta.

According to Brigham and Women’s Hospital, placenta accreta occurs in approximately 0.2 percent of all pregnancies.

Placenta accreta can lead to severe bleeding after delivery due to attempts to remove the placenta when it is attached to the uterus. If it is not carefully managed and treated, it can be life threatening.

Delivery is often planned early, between 34 and 37 weeks of pregnancy, depending on the severity of the accreta.

If there is an early, heavy bleeding, the birth may have to take place very early because the mother may become unstable due to the bleeding.

Mrs. Colwick said: “They have placed me in the pregnancy wing. Here we were in this room surrounded by women giving birth and crying babies and we were told that Quinn had no chance of survival and that we were just waiting to give birth to him.

“It was a few solemn weeks.”

Doctors caused labor on December 26, 2016 and little Quinn was stillborn and weighed only half a pound.

“I faded in and out of consciousness,” Mrs. Colwick said. “I didn’t respond, my eyes rolled to the back of my head and I burned up.

“My fever was way too high and they grabbed ice on me.

“They broke my waters and he was born. Quinn was too small to survive; he went straight to heaven.

“My husband was stuck in mourning for the loss of his son and all these medical decisions.”

Mrs. Colwick lost so much blood during labor that a Dallas trauma doctor was flown in.

“My womb was bleeding blood. Doctors pumped blood into me as soon as it flowed away. ”

Mrs. Colwick developed a septic shock when blood pressure drops to a dangerously low level. It is also considered as part of the third and most serious phase of sepsis.

An infection, which, according to doctors, was E. coli, led to sepsis – the overwhelming and life-threatening response of the body to infection that can lead to tissue damage, organ failure, and death.

Mrs. Colwick lost so much blood during labor that a Dallas trauma doctor was flown in. She developed a septic shock when the blood pressure drops to a dangerously low level

Mrs. Colwick lost so much blood during labor that a Dallas trauma doctor was flown in. She developed a septic shock when the blood pressure drops to a dangerously low level

Mrs. Colwick lost so much blood during labor that a Dallas trauma doctor was flown in. She developed a septic shock when the blood pressure drops to a dangerously low level

Doctors had no choice but to amputate Mrs. Colwick's lower legs, her left thumb and index finger because blood could not reach them. She is pictured at home with Kenzie

Doctors had no choice but to amputate Mrs. Colwick's lower legs, her left thumb and index finger because blood could not reach them. She is pictured at home with Kenzie

Doctors had no choice but to amputate Mrs. Colwick’s lower legs, her left thumb and index finger because blood could not reach them. She is pictured at home with Kenzie

Mrs. Colwick, whose left thumb and index finger were amputated, said: “My limbs began to die. My legs were black and withered, my toes looked like raisins’

Mrs. Colwick said: “My world went black. That infection spread all over my body.

“The sepsis shut off my kidneys and my lungs, so I was on a ventilator.”

“My limbs began to die. My legs were black and withered, my toes looked like raisins. “

Two months later, doctors decided to master Mrs. Colwick’s legs and part of her left hand because the tissue was so damaged due to lack of blood.

She said: ‘I remember that I came in extreme pain and confusion. My husband had to explain what happened. I had everything minus my womb and my feet. “

Doctors had also removed Mrs. Colwick’s womb because the tissue had “died.”

From January to February 2017, Mrs. Colwick ‘had no chance of survival’. She spent April to September in the IC and had several operations.

Finally in March 2018 she could return home.

Her health insurance had refused her health insurance and had difficulty adapting to life as an amputee in a large wheelchair that she couldn’t push herself into.

“The wheelchair in which they sent me home was a simple chair at Amazon.

“Kevin had to dress my wounds every day.”

Mrs. Colwick was initially refused by her health insurance. In April 2019 she was finally approved for prostheses (photo)

Mrs. Colwick was initially refused by her health insurance. In April 2019 she was finally approved for prostheses (photo)

Mrs. Colwick was initially refused by her health insurance. In April 2019 she was finally approved for prostheses (photo)

Mrs. Colwick was fed through a tube and needed skin grafts on her back because of some time in a hospital bed. She is pictured in the hospital

Mrs. Colwick was fed through a tube and needed skin grafts on her back because of some time in a hospital bed. She is pictured in the hospital

Mrs. Colwick was fed through a tube and needed skin grafts on her back because of some time in a hospital bed. She is pictured in the hospital

Amy, a business coach, from Lafayette, Louisiana, raised the money that Mrs. Colwick needed to get an adapted wheelchair that was refused her health insurance (photo)

Amy, a business coach, from Lafayette, Louisiana, raised the money that Mrs. Colwick needed to get an adapted wheelchair that was refused her health insurance (photo)

Amy, a business coach, from Lafayette, Louisiana, raised the money that Mrs. Colwick needed to get an adapted wheelchair that was refused her health insurance (photo)

Despite all her health problems, Mrs. Colwick, pictured with her prosthetic legs, says she wants to get the best out of her life. She said: 'I hope to help and inspire others. I was 27 when this happened - no one expects a 27-year-old mother to die '

Despite all her health problems, Mrs. Colwick, pictured with her prosthetic legs, says she wants to get the best out of her life. She said: 'I hope to help and inspire others. I was 27 when this happened - no one expects a 27-year-old mother to die '

Despite all her health problems, Mrs. Colwick, pictured with her prosthetic legs, says she wants to get the best out of her life. She said: ‘I hope to help and inspire others. I was 27 when this happened – no one expects a 27-year-old mother to die ‘

Mrs. Colwick was able to stand on her knees for the first time on January 15, 2019.

“Until then, Kevin had picked me up and put me in my seat.”

She was finally approved for prostheses in April 2019 and applied for a modified chair in October.

“My doctor placed the order and they refused my seat. It’s just insane. I have no feet and I cannot put on my prostheses alone. “

She shared her frustration on Instagram where Amy, a business coach from Lafayette, Louisiana, came across her story.

“I glanced at Callie’s page, and while I watched her videos, tears came to my face,” said Amy, whose second name was not revealed.

Amy launched the fundraising campaign and Mrs. Colwick was surprised to see how quickly people donated.

“It was shared as wild fire,” she said.

‘This generous gift from a complete stranger gives me the opportunity to make my house fully accessible.

‘It’s a lightweight, custom-made chair, so I can pick it up myself. I can really spin myself into it. ”

The two women met for the first time on January 24 when Amy flew to Dallas for work. Mrs. Colwick told Amy how big the difference was that the baby pink chair had made her life.

“She told me what the wheelchair would actually do for her,” Amy said.

“She told me it was the first time in three years that she could go to the toilet herself.”

Despite all her health problems, Mrs. Colwick says she wants to get the best out of her life.

She said: ‘I hope to help and inspire others. I was 27 when this happened – no one expects a 27-year-old mother to die.

“I really feel like I’m living on borrowed time.”

WHAT IS SEPSIS?

Sepsis occurs when the body responds to an infection by attacking its own organs and tissues.

In the UK, around 44,000 people die of sepsis every year. Someone from the disease dies every 3.5 seconds worldwide.

Sepsis has symptoms similar to flu, gastroenteritis and a breast infection.

Among which:

  • Svague speech or confusion
  • Extreme chills or muscle pain
  • Pdo not assess urine on a day
  • Salways short of breath
  • Iit feels like you’re dying
  • Schin stained or discolored

Symptoms in children are:

  • Fast breathing
  • Fits or convulses
  • Spotted, bluish or pale skin
  • Skin rash that does not fade when pressed
  • idleness
  • Feeling abnormally cold

Among the five, repeated vomiting, no eating or no peeing can occur for 12 hours.

Everyone can develop sepsis, but it is most common in people who have recently had surgery, have a urinary catheter, or have been in the hospital for a long time.

Other risk people are people with a weak immune system, chemotherapy patients, pregnant women, the elderly and very young people.

The treatment varies depending on the location of the infection, but includes antibiotics, IV fluids and oxygen if necessary.

Source: UK Sepsis Trust and NHS choices

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