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The trend for & # 39; unplugged brudings & # 39; is increasing, with brides and grooms asking their guests to turn off their phones and cameras during the ceremony, so that wedding photographer's photos are not ruined. Stock photo
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More and more couples are choosing to have an & # 39; unplugged wedding & # 39; to prevent guests with unexpected pleasure from ruining the photos of their professional photographer.

The growing trend, where brides and grooms demand that their guests do not use mobile phones or cameras on the big day, has been rising since 2010.

Couples were bitterly disappointed when cracked iPhone screens and large iPads stained the foreground of their professional photos.

And now wedding photographers are also talking about the frustration they feel when they miss big moments due to & # 39; selfish & # 39; visitors.

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The trend for & # 39; unplugged brudings & # 39; is increasing, with brides and grooms asking their guests to turn off their phones and cameras during the ceremony, so that wedding photographer's photos are not ruined. Stock photo

The trend for & # 39; unplugged brudings & # 39; is increasing, with brides and grooms asking their guests to turn off their phones and cameras during the ceremony, so that wedding photographer's photos are not ruined. Stock photo

Have you had an unplugged wedding?

Contact:

izzy.nikolic@mailonline.co.uk

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tips@dailymail.co.uk

Hannah Way posted a photo of her & # 39; perfect shot & # 39; that was ruined by the outstretched arm of a guest holding their phone.

In addition to the post that has become viral and shared more than 174,000 times, she wrote: & # 39; To the girl with the iPhone …

& # 39; You have not only ruined my shot, but you have taken this moment away from the groom, the father of the bride and the bride.

& # 39; What exactly are you planning to do with that photo? Honestly. Are you going to print it? Save it? View it every day? No you're not.

Wedding photographer Hannah Way posted a photo on Facebook, which has now been shared more than 174,000 times, where she called a guest because she & # 39; perfect photo & # 39; ruined with an iPhone. Stock photo
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Wedding photographer Hannah Way posted a photo on Facebook, which has now been shared more than 174,000 times, where she called a guest because she & # 39; perfect photo & # 39; ruined with an iPhone. Stock photo

Wedding photographer Hannah Way posted a photo on Facebook, which has now been shared more than 174,000 times, where she called a guest because she & # 39; perfect photo & # 39; ruined with an iPhone. Stock photo

& # 39; But my bride would have printed this photo, often looked at it, and thought about it when her father walked her down the aisle on her wedding day.

& # 39; But instead you wanted to take a photo with your phone, block my view and take a photo that you don't use.

& # 39; Guests, please stop viewing weddings that you are attending through a screen, but turn off your phone and enjoy the ceremony instead. You are important to the bride and groom, otherwise you would not attend the wedding.

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& # 39; So please let me do my job, and you sit back, relax and enjoy this once in a lifetime moment.

& # 39; Kind regards, wedding photographers. & # 39;

A wedding photographer said they weren't even able to take a good photo of & # 39; the kiss & # 39; because of enthusiastic guests.

She said: "You have not only lost my chance, but you have taken this moment away from the groom, the father of the bride, and the bride." Stock photo

She said: "You have not only lost my chance, but you have taken this moment away from the groom, the father of the bride, and the bride." Stock photo

She said: "You have not only lost my chance, but you have taken this moment away from the groom, the father of the bride, and the bride." Stock photo

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Kathryn Anne said: “Unfortunately because everyone wants to capture THE moment, the kiss, a woman with a large iPad has plotted it straight in the aisle as the preacher announced it.

& # 39; I was quite disappointed. & # 39;

But not all photographers feel that way, Craig Mitchell Dyer says he 100 percent disagrees with the concept of closed weddings.

He said: & # 39; Every time I see a message about how great it would be to put on a & # 39; to be a closed wedding, I collapse. Great for who?

& # 39; Our job as a photographer is to get the image no matter what. Is someone getting in our way? Move. & # 39;

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The unplugged request sometimes even extends to couples who ask their guests not to post photos of the big day until after they are taken.

The topic has left social media users divided, with some saying that guests didn't think taking photos was a problem, while others were concerned that guests were not & # 39; in the moment & # 39; to be.

A user, known as Julie, said: & i just decided it wasn't big enough to say anything or that our officer made an announcement.

& # 39; I am really happy that our guests took photos & videos & # 39; s, otherwise I would still not have seen photos & # 39; s. & # 39;

Another said: & # 39; I hired a professional to take high-quality photos of the ceremony and it will be disappointing to me if people's faces in the background are covered by a rectangle. & # 39;

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