Counting Tigers ITV program: Warden adopts tiger cubs who became orphans after their mother was poached

The heartwarming dedication of rangers in India is documented as they fight to preserve the wild tiger population, in ITV documentary Counting Tigers – A Survival Special.

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The show, which is broadcast on Tuesday evening, shows a director, Yogendra Singh, who has adopted two young abandoned tiger cubs Bhandhav and Bhandavi, who are thought to have poached the mother for the illegal fur market.

The cubs were only 10 days old when they were found against the winter elements and hours away from death before being taken to the Bandhavgarh Tiger Reserve in central India.

Because the cubs only come out of the danger zone until they are 180 days old, Yogendra decided to take up the challenge to raise them by hand, to get up every few hours to feed them and before they to care & # 39; like his & # 39; children & # 39 ;.

ITV documentary Counting Tigers - A Survival Special shows a guard, Yogendra Singh, who adopted two young abandoned tiger cubs Bhandhav and Bhandavi, who are believed to have been poached for the illegal fur market (seen)

ITV documentary Counting Tigers – A Survival Special shows a guard, Yogendra Singh, who adopted two young abandoned tiger cubs Bhandhav and Bhandavi, who are believed to have been poached for the illegal fur market (seen)

Touching images show that Yogendra takes care of them, plays with them and feeds them every two hours, because it is revealed that the young people are still vulnerable.

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And his efforts seem to be bearing fruit, as a number of counts made by conservationists of the wild tiger population every four years show that they have finally risen – by 700.

The census, conducted by the National Tiger Conservation Authority of India and recorded in the program, told by Joanna Lumley and presented by conservationist Martin Hughes-Games, is the first fully scientific study of the Indian tiger population ever conducted.

Their results show that the number of wild tigers in the country has risen from 2,226 four years ago to 2,967 – an increase of 741. It is considered the largest increase in the number of wild tigers since the start of the records.

Because the cubs only come out of the danger zone until they are 180 days old, Yogendra decided to take up the challenge to raise them by hand, to get up every few hours to feed them and before they to care & # 39; like his & # 39; children & # 39;

Because the cubs only come out of the danger zone until they are 180 days old, Yogendra decided to take up the challenge to raise them by hand, to get up every few hours to feed them and before they to care & # 39; like his & # 39; children & # 39;

Because the cubs only come out of the danger zone until they are 180 days old, Yogendra decided to take up the challenge to raise them by hand, to get up every few hours to feed them and before they to care & # 39; like his & # 39; children & # 39;

The cubs were only 10 days old when they were found against the winter elements and hours away from death before being taken to the Bandhavgarh Tiger Reserve in central India.

The cubs were only 10 days old when they were found against the winter elements and hours away from death before being taken to the Bandhavgarh Tiger Reserve in central India.

The cubs were only 10 days old when they were found against the winter elements and hours away from death before being taken to the Bandhavgarh Tiger Reserve in central India.

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Dr. Joy sees a joyful scene in the show. Yadvendradev Jhala of the Wildlife Institute of India and chief scientist in the official tiger count, and shares the findings.

He shouts: & # 39; The population has risen! We did not expect this, but it is, and that is incredible. I think the increase is in those areas where the number of tigers was already high. That is something that we have difficulty recording.

& # 39; We thought they had reached the capacity, but many of these areas (have risen) and that is what the number has added, actually. & # 39;

Wildlife campaigner Martin, who is following the count in the program, responds to the news that the number has increased by saying: & # 39; I must say that on my arrival I was so worried about what the count was going to reveal.

Touching images show that Yogendra takes care of them, plays with them and feeds them every two hours, because it is revealed that the young people are still vulnerable.

Touching images show that Yogendra takes care of them, plays with them and feeds them every two hours, because it is revealed that the young people are still vulnerable.

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Touching images show that Yogendra takes care of them, plays with them and feeds them every two hours, because it is revealed that the young people are still vulnerable.

The tigers respond well to his care, but they are only out of the forest when they reach 180 days

The tigers respond well to his care, but they are only out of the forest when they reach 180 days

The tigers respond well to his care, but they are only out of the forest when they reach 180 days

One of the cubs tries to see a little roar after it was found in freezing conditions at just 10 days old

One of the cubs tries to see a little roar after it was found in freezing conditions at just 10 days old

One of the cubs tries to see a little roar after it was found in freezing conditions at just 10 days old

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But considering what is happening, seeing the numbers coming in, I am confident, despite all the challenges this animal faces, that the tiger will continue to survive here in India. So that I can go home quietly and happily. & # 39;

There are now reportedly fewer than 4,000 wild tigers worldwide, and India has an estimated 60 percent of those left. If India & # 39; s number had dropped this year, it could have sounded the death knell for these most iconic predators.

Trophy hunters, poachers and basic human expansion have all destroyed tiger effects by destroying the habitats in which they live. It is estimated that the number of tigers on the planet has fallen by more than 95 percent in the last century alone.

Currently, two tigers are killed by poachers every week, and often their cubs are left orphaned to care for themselves in the wild, with few reaching adulthood.

One of the cubs can be seen resting from playing with his brothers and sisters, while the overseers keep a close eye

One of the cubs can be seen resting from playing with his brothers and sisters, while the overseers keep a close eye

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One of the cubs can be seen resting from playing with his brothers and sisters, while the overseers keep a close eye

Cheeky cubs Bhandhav and Bhandavi are seen in the park where they are raised

Cheeky cubs Bhandhav and Bhandavi are seen in the park where they are raised

Cheeky cubs Bhandhav and Bhandavi are seen in the park where they are raised

Following the work of guards and scientists in the beautiful landscapes of India, Martin Hughes-Games follows the new count from start to finish because he uses the latest technology to determine numbers.

He says: & # 39; India is a country that is industrializing incredibly fast. Everywhere you look there are roads and railways and industries, and of course human needs will always come above those of nature. The tiger populations are therefore increasingly isolated. So it becomes harder for the tiger to survive in this country. & # 39;

Camera traps photograph over 30,000 tiger images, their stripes, such as fingerprints, used to identify each individual tiger, while using special mobile map apps and DNA analysis.

Martin also explores the territory of the tigers, because counting them can be dangerous. In the mangrove swamps of Sunderbans, tigers have adapted to become lighter and more fleet. Park rangers can easily get stuck in the muddy swamps and become prey. More than 30 people die every year from wetland tiger attacks.

He discovers that the tiger is now tragically extinct in at least one of India's 50 natural parks, and can only hope that some of the other parks have seen a growth in numbers to compensate for this.

And his efforts seem to be bearing fruit, as a number of counts made by conservationists of the wild tiger population every four years show that they have finally risen - by 700. A wild tiger is seen

And his efforts seem to be bearing fruit, as a number of counts made by conservationists of the wild tiger population every four years show that they have finally risen - by 700. A wild tiger is seen

And his efforts seem to be bearing fruit, as a number of counts made by conservationists of the wild tiger population every four years show that they have finally risen – by 700. A wild tiger is seen

Trophy hunters, poachers and basic human expansion have all destroyed tiger populations by destroying the habitats in which they live. It is estimated that the number of tigers on the planet has fallen by more than 95 percent in the last century alone.
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Trophy hunters, poachers and basic human expansion have all destroyed tiger populations by destroying the habitats in which they live. It is estimated that the number of tigers on the planet has fallen by more than 95 percent in the last century alone.

Trophy hunters, poachers and basic human expansion have all destroyed tiger populations by destroying the habitats in which they live. It is estimated that the number of tigers on the planet has fallen by more than 95 percent in the last century alone.

Poachers usually catch an adult tiger by its leg in a trap with metal jaws, and while incapacitated for work, the tiger is then stabbed through the mouth and from the back to prevent damage to the valuable fur. But poachers are not only looking for fur – there is a huge demand for tiger products in China and Southeast Asia.

Debbie Banks from the Environmental Investigation Agency explains the attraction for some tiger products.

She says: & # 39; Almost every part of the tiger unfortunately has a value in the market. Skins are used as a luxury interior for the floor, on the wall, on the couch.

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& # 39; It is a market that is suitable for those who want to show off their power, their wealth and their status. Tiger bone is used in medicine to treat rheumatism and arthritis, but it is also used to make a tonic wine as a general bone-strengthening tonic.

& # 39; Often purchased as a prestigious gift if you want to bribe a civil servant or win a contract, you can donate a bottle of tiger bone wine.

& # 39; In some places it is sold as a virility product. The teeth and claws, which are appreciated as jewelry. Again non-essential, it's all luxurious. There is absolutely no essential reason why a body part of a tiger should be traded. & # 39;

ITV documentary Counting Tigers – A Survival Special will be broadcast on Tuesday at 9 p.m.

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