Costa Coffee forced to remember new chicken and bacon pasta salad

Costa Coffee forced to remember new chicken and bacon pasta salad because the label does not warn contains mustard, milk and VIS

  • The £ 3.99 salad was introduced earlier this month as part of the chain's summer menu
  • If they are eaten by people who are allergic to milk and dairy, they can get into an anaphylactic shock
  • Costa Coffee urged people not to eat a salad and to take the product back for a refund
  • Ketting said labeling error only affects products with an expiration date of May 22

Costa Coffee is forced to pull its Chicken and Bacon Pasta Salad because it contains fish, milk and mustard that are not mentioned on the label.

The £ 3.99 salad, launched this month as part of the chain's new summer menu, can pose a risk to people who are allergic to milk and dairy products.

If they are eaten by allergy sufferers, they can get into an anaphylactic shock – which can be fatal without emergency medical treatment.

Costa Coffee is forced to pull its Chicken and Bacon Pasta Salad because it contains fish, milk and mustard that are not mentioned on the label

Costa Coffee is forced to pull its Chicken and Bacon Pasta Salad because it contains fish, milk and mustard that are not mentioned on the label

The Food Standards Agency (FSA) has announced the recall for products with an expiration date of 22 May.

In a bulletin it says: & # 39; If you have purchased the above product, do not eat it. Instead, send it back to the store where it was purchased for a full refund. & # 39;

A Costa spokesperson said: & # 39; Costa Coffee remembers the Chicken & Bacon Pasta Salad with an expiration date of 22 May due to a product labeling error of undeclared allergens; fish, milk and mustard.

WHAT IS AN ANAPHYLACTIC SHOCK?

Anaphylaxis, also known as anaphylactic shock, can be killed within minutes.

It is a serious and potentially life-threatening response to a trigger, such as an allergy.

The reaction can often be caused by certain foods, including peanuts, dairy products and shellfish.

However, some drugs, bee stings and even latex in condoms can also cause the life-threatening reaction.

According to the NHS, it happens when the immune system overreacts to a trigger.

Symptoms include: feeling light-headed or fainting; breathing difficulties – such as fast, superficial breathing; wheezing; a fast heartbeat; damp skin; confusion and fear and collapse or lose consciousness.

It is considered a medical emergency and requires immediate treatment.

Insect stings are not dangerous for most victims, but a person does not necessarily have a pre-existing condition to be in danger.

A consecutive accumulation of stitches can cause a person to develop an allergy, with another incentive causing the anaphylactic reaction.

"Customers who have purchased a Chicken & Bacon Pasta Salad with an expiration date of 22 May may not eat the product and instead return the product to the store with or without a receipt for a full refund.

& # 39; We immediately notified the appropriate allergen and food management authorities and we are conducting a full investigation of how this happened. & # 39;

Approximately two million people in the UK have food allergies, according to estimates.

Anaphylaxis, also known as anaphylactic shock, can be killed within minutes. It is a serious and potentially life-threatening response to a trigger, such as an allergy.

It is after the FSA said earlier this month that retailers who prepare and package food to sell locally must list all the ingredients they use to prevent allergy deaths.

The FSA board has decided to recommend that food stores should provide all foods with a complete list of ingredients, with emphasis on the 14 most important allergens, including nuts, eggs and milk.

The Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs has the final say on whether new rules will be introduced.

The proposed changes followed the death of Natasha Ednan-Laperouse, who died after a sandwich with Pret A Manger.

Miss Ednan-Laperouse, 15, from Fulham, southwest London, crashed aboard a flight in July 2016 after eating a baguette from a Pret outlet at Heathrow Airport.

The coroner on her inquest said she died of anaphylaxis after eating the artichoke, olives, and tapenade sandwich with sesame, for which she was allergic.

He described the labeling of Pret as "inadequate", largely because the company used a legal loophole to avoid a complete list of ingredients on the package.

After Natasha's death, her parents, Nadim and Tanya, from Fulham, South West London, launched a campaign for better labeling.

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