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Coronavirus USA: Pandemic caused 15,000 additional Alzheimer’s deaths

The coronavirus pandemic had led to another 15,000 US deaths from Alzheimer’s disease and dementia.

About 100,000 people died of age-related brain diseases from February 2020 to May 2020, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

This means that the mortality rate for Alzheimer’s disease and dementia was 18 percent higher than the average in recent years, The Wall Street Journal reports.

In addition, several states peaked from early to mid-April – including New York – and an estimated 250 additional people with dementia died each day, both directly and indirectly caused by the virus.

About 100,000 people died of Alzheimer's disease and dementia between February 2020 and May 2020, about 15,000 more than would have happened.  Pictured: Medical workers load a patient from Andover Subacute and Rehabilitation Center into an ambulance in Andover, New Jersey, April 16

About 100,000 people died of Alzheimer’s disease and dementia between February 2020 and May 2020, about 15,000 more than would have happened. Pictured: Medical workers load a patient from Andover Subacute and Rehabilitation Center into an ambulance in Andover, New Jersey, April 16

The number of deaths from Alzheimer's and dementia surpassed 1,000 in California, New Jersey, New York and Texas.  Pictured: Pictured: medical workers load a deceased body from Andover Subacute and Rehabilitation Center into an ambulance in Andover, New Jersey, April 16

The number of deaths from Alzheimer's and dementia surpassed 1,000 in California, New Jersey, New York and Texas.  Pictured: Pictured: medical workers load a deceased body from Andover Subacute and Rehabilitation Center into an ambulance in Andover, New Jersey, April 16

The number of deaths from Alzheimer’s and dementia surpassed 1,000 in California, New Jersey, New York and Texas. Pictured: Pictured: medical workers load a deceased body from Andover Subacute and Rehabilitation Center into an ambulance in Andover, New Jersey, April 16

An estimated 5.8 million Americans over 65 years of age will live with Alzheimer’s disease in 2020 and are expected to reach 13.8 million by 2050.

Sufferers experience a decline in cognitive, behavioral, and physical abilities, and there is no cure.

Those who have the disease have a build-up of two proteins, amyloid beta and tau, in the brain that form lumps, which choke and destroy neurons – leading to loss of memory and confusion.

In 2018, the most recent year for which full data is available, about 120,000 Americans died of Alzheimer’s disease.

The CDC’s National Center for Health Statistics listed the disease as the sixth leading cause of death.

It is known that the risk of serious cases of COVID-19 increases with age, and that older adults are most at risk.

The CDC says some deaths were likely due to the virus, but not listed on the death certificates as the cause of death.

But other deaths were also likely due to causes such as disruptions to the daily routine and lack of care.

“It’s one fall and it’s getting everything going,” Nicole Fowler, assistant director of Indiana University’s Center for Aging Research, told The Journal.

“It’s a day without fluids and they’re getting dehydrated and it’s causing a series of events. It’s amazing how little it actually costs to upset their environment. ‘

The Journal reports that the number of deaths from Alzheimer’s disease and dementia in four states exceeded 1,000: California, New Jersey, New York and Texas.

However, Alzheimer’s disease is not the only underlying health condition that suffers from excessive deaths.

According to the CDC, hypertension has had an additional 8,000 deaths, diabetes has 5,000 additional deaths, and strokes has an additional 3,700 deaths.

Dr. Robert Anderson, chief of the Mortality Statistics Department at the CDC, said this is a combination of deaths from COVID-19 and Americans in ill health, whose deaths were accelerated from the pandemic.

“That extra stress on a vulnerable person can cause people to die,” he told The Journal.

In the US, there are more than 2.5 confirmed cases of the virus and more than 125,000 deaths.

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