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Coronavirus USA: 300 k deaths predicted for late 2020

A new forecast predicts that the coronavirus death toll in the United States will nearly double by the end of the year, but 70,000 lives could be saved if everyone wears a mask – as grim new numbers reveal that one person in the past week died every 80 seconds.

The University of Washington Institute of Health Metrics has revised its forecast of the death toll on Thursday to predict nearly 300,000 deaths by December 1.

Researchers say 70,000 lives can be saved if 95 percent of Americans wear masks as of today when they leave their home.

Currently, the US death toll from COVID-19 is over 158,000.

It comes from grim numbers that revealed that an American died every 80 seconds of the corona virus in the past week.

The University of Washington's Institute for Health Metrics revised the death toll forecast on Thursday to predict nearly 300,000 deaths by December 1. Researchers say 70,000 lives can be saved if 95 percent of Americans wear masks as of today when they leave their home

The University of Washington’s Institute for Health Metrics revised the death toll forecast on Thursday to predict nearly 300,000 deaths by December 1. Researchers say 70,000 lives can be saved if 95 percent of Americans wear masks as of today when they leave their home

The death toll in the past seven days alone is just over 7,500, and on average 1,000 Americans die every day.

Deaths from COVID-19 have now risen nationally for four weeks, while the number of infections for the second week has decreased, according to an analysis of data from Reuters.

IHME director Dr. Christopher Murray acknowledged that there appears to be less transmission of the virus in the hotspot states of Arizona, California, Florida and Texas, but said the death toll is on the rise and will continue to rise over the next two weeks.

He reduced the decline in infections to a combination of local mandates for the use of masks, closings of bars and restaurants and more responsible public behavior.

“The behavior of the public had a direct correlation with the transmission of the virus and, in turn, the number of deaths,” said Murray.

Such efforts to act more cautiously and responsibly will be an important aspect of the COVID-19 forecasts and up-and-down patterns in individual states over the coming months and into next year.

“We see a rollercoaster in the United States.

It seems that people wear masks and become more socially distant more often as infections increase, and after a while as infections decrease, people drop their guard and stop taking these measures to protect themselves and others – which of course leads to more infections. And the potentially deadly cycle begins anew. ‘

Deaths from COVID-19 have now risen nationwide for four weeks. Currently, the US death toll from COVID-19 is over 158,000

Deaths from COVID-19 have now risen nationwide for four weeks. Currently, the US death toll from COVID-19 is over 158,000

Deaths from COVID-19 have now risen nationwide for four weeks. Currently, the US death toll from COVID-19 is over 158,000

Deaths from coronavirus increased nationally by 36 percent in the week ending August 2, according to a Reuters analysis of state and county data

Deaths from coronavirus increased nationally by 36 percent in the week ending August 2, according to a Reuters analysis of state and county data

Deaths from coronavirus increased nationally by 36 percent in the week ending August 2, according to a Reuters analysis of state and county data

Murray said that based on cases, hospitalizations, and deaths in several states, transmission of COVID-19 is increasing, including Colorado, Idaho, Kansas, Kentucky, Mississippi, Missouri, Ohio, Oklahoma, Oregon, and Virginia.

“These states may face increasing cases for several weeks and may then see a response to more responsible behavior,” said Murray.

Deaths from coronavirus increased nationally by 36 percent in the week ending August 2, according to a Reuters analysis of state and county data.

A total of 22 states have reported an increase in deaths for at least two consecutive weeks, including California, Texas, and Florida hot spots.

Deaths in Arizona, another hotspot state, have been decreasing for the first time since they started rising in early July.

Although the number of deaths in the United States is now increasing, they are below April levels, when an average of 2,000 people died each day from the virus – usually in the original New York epicenter.

Deaths increased in April in the weeks after coronavirus infections had increased mainly in the Northeast.

Fatalities are now increasing in Sunbelt states and throughout the Midwest after infections have increased there in June and July.

Mortality is a lagging indicator and can continue to rise for weeks after new infections have fallen. Coronavirus mortality, when it occurs, usually occurs several weeks after a person is first infected.

The number of infections in the United States has now declined for the second consecutive week, with an average of nearly 60,000 new cases reported each day

The number of infections in the United States has now declined for the second consecutive week, with an average of nearly 60,000 new cases reported each day

The number of infections in the United States has now declined for the second consecutive week, with an average of nearly 60,000 new cases reported each day

The number of new COVID-19 cases reported last week fell 5 percent from the previous week. California, Florida and Texas collectively accounted for nearly 180,000 of the new cases, although the new infections were lower in all three states than in the previous week

The number of new COVID-19 cases reported last week fell 5 percent from the previous week. California, Florida and Texas collectively accounted for nearly 180,000 of the new cases, although the new infections were lower in all three states than in the previous week

The number of new COVID-19 cases reported last week fell 5 percent from the previous week. California, Florida and Texas collectively accounted for nearly 180,000 of the new cases, although the new infections were lower in all three states than in the previous week

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