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Coronavirus: US ‘should fall below 10,000 daily cases next month’

The United States must reduce new COVID-19 cases to less than 10,000 a day the next month or else it will risk a catastrophic fall situation, says Dr. Anthony Fauci.

Fauci, the leading infectious disease expert in the US, said on Monday that coronavirus cases had to decline rapidly in order to gain some control over the pandemic by the end of the year.

The US is currently averaging about 60,000 cases per day, bringing the total number of infections to more than 4.7 million.

“The country continues to register 50,000 to 60,000 new cases per day, suggesting it is in the middle of the first wave,” Fauci said. JAMA networkDr. Howard Bauchner.

“If we don’t get them down, we’ll be in a really bad situation in the fall.

Dr. Anthony Fauci, the leading infectious disease expert in the US, said on Monday that cases of coronavirus should decline rapidly to gain some control over the pandemic by the end of the year.

Dr. Anthony Fauci, the leading infectious disease expert in the US, said on Monday that cases of coronavirus should decline rapidly to gain some control over the pandemic by the end of the year.

The outbreak first hit the US in March, when New York and other northeastern states saw a wave.

Infections were on the downward trajectory before hitting Sunbelt states in June and July.

Fauci said that when cases initially declined, it came down to a baseline of about 20,000.

He said that even 20,000 new cases a day were “not a favorable baseline.”

“We need to keep our arms around that and keep it in when we go into the trap,” he said of the recent wave of cases.

Fauci urged the Americans to show “a degree of consistency” when it comes to wearing masks, washing hands, and taking social distance.

“It’s not rocket science,” he said.

He said that unless people followed these countermeasures, “the virus, if left to its own devices, will revive.”

His comments came as a former World Health Organization doctor who helped eradicate smallpox said the world would fight COVID-19 for the next four years as it moves from one hotspot to another.

Dr Larry Brilliant, a California epidemiologist, told it USA TODAY that the coming years would not be “all doom and gloom” because effective vaccines will come.

“In four years’ time, we’ll still be chasing the virus. But it won’t be (today), ”said Brilliant.

“It will be like the smallpox eradication program. The polio eradication program. Having yellow fever in some countries and not in others.

“We are facing a tough and rocky ride.”

Currently, there are now 4.7 million cases of coronavirus in the US and more than 155,000 Americans have died.

The University of Washington’s Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation predicted in March that the pandemic could kill more than 81,000 people in July.

In its latest statement in mid-July, the IHME said its model now projects the death toll to more than 230,000 on November 1.

Fauci said that when cases initially declined in May after they caught on mainly in the Northeast, cases reached a baseline of about 20,000. He said that even 20,000 new cases every day were “not a favorable baseline.”

Dr. Deborah Birx, the head of the White House coronavirus task force, warned on Sunday that the US has entered a new phase of the outbreak with infections that are “extraordinarily widespread” in both rural areas and cities.

As coronavirus cases continue to increase in much of the country, public health officials are trying to work with governors to tailor responses for each state.

“We are in a new phase,” Birx told CNN’s State of the Union. “What we see today is different from March and April. It is extremely widespread. ‘

Birx warned that people living in multi-generation households in an area experiencing an outbreak should wear masks at home to protect the elderly or those with underlying conditions.

She said federal officials have been working on individual reports for each state by examining community trends and hospital data.

“Each of these responses needs to be dramatically tailored,” she said, adding that what she’d visited in 14 states over the past three weeks was a cause for concern.

“As I traveled across the country, I saw all of America moving,” said Birx. “If you’ve chosen to go on vacation to a hotspot, you really have to come back to protect people with comorbidities and assume you’re infected.”

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