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Coronavirus US: Mortality rates three times higher in prisons

Coronavirus mortality rates are THREE TIMES so high in U.S. prisons and then in the general population, research shows

  • Researchers compared coronavirus cases and death rates among the U.S. population to prisoners
  • There were 3,251 cases per 100,000 prisoners, which is 5.5 higher than the general public
  • The death rate was 39 deaths per 100,000 prisoners, which is three times higher than that of the US population
  • Prisons are often overcrowded – making social distance difficult – unsanitary and lacking cleaning products

Coronavirus infection and death rates are much higher in U.S. prisons than in the general population, a new study suggests.

Investigators found that the infection rate was 5.5 times higher among prisoners than among the American public.

In addition, the Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health team found that the death rate among prisoners was three times higher than among the population.

Experts say that prisons are often overcrowded – making social distance difficult or even impossible – unsanitary and a lack of cleaning products.

In a new study from Johns Hopkins University, researchers found that there were 3,251 cases per 100,000 prisoners, which is 5.5 higher than the general public (above)

In a new study from Johns Hopkins University, researchers found that there were 3,251 cases per 100,000 prisoners, which is 5.5 higher than the general public (above)

The death rate was 39 deaths per 100,000 prisoners, which is three times higher than that of the US population. Pictured: Prisoners gather outside the tents at the Federal Correctional Institute Terminal Island prison in Los Angeles, California, May 1

The death rate was 39 deaths per 100,000 prisoners, which is three times higher than that of the US population. Pictured: Prisoners gather outside the tents at the Federal Correctional Institute Terminal Island prison in Los Angeles, California, May 1

The death rate was 39 deaths per 100,000 prisoners, which is three times higher than that of the US population. Pictured: Prisoners gather outside the tents at the Federal Correctional Institute Terminal Island prison in Los Angeles, California, May 1

For the study, published in JAMA Network OpenThe team looked at prisoner data from the UCLA Law COVID-19 Behind Bars Data Project.

Confirmed coronavirus and deaths were confirmed between March 31, 2020 and June 6, 2020.

The same data for the states was obtained from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention during the same period.

The results showed that there were 42,107 infections among 1,295,285 prisoners with a number of 3,251 cases per 100,000 prisoners.

That is 5.5 times higher than the general number of cases of the population, which is currently 587 per 100,000 people.

Meanwhile, there were 510 deaths among prisoners, equivalent to 39 deaths per 100,000 prisoners.

After correcting for many of the deaths among the general public in adults ages 65 and older, the researchers determined that coronavirus death in prison was three times as high.

The daily growth rate is also much higher: 8.3 percent per day in correctional facilities and 3.4 percent per day in the American public.

“While these numbers stand out, we actually think inequalities within prisons are much greater,” lead author Dr. Brendan Saloner, an associate professor in the health policy and management department at Bloomberg School, told CNN.

Saloner said some prisons don’t even report cases, and worse, others don’t test prisoners.

Part of the problem is that the pandemic was particularly challenging for prisoners in prisons and prisons.

Many correctional facilities are overcrowded or have common areas where social distance is not possible

There is often insufficient soap in the bathroom to wash their hands and a lack of access to cleaning products such as hand sanitizer and wipes.

“Prisoners are entitled to adequate health protection during their incarceration,” Saloner told CNN.

“The reality of these findings shows that we are not getting close to their basic needs.

“Ultimately, it creates a dangerous situation for the prisoners, prison staff, the communities in which the prisons are located and our overall effort to manage the crisis,” he said.

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