WhatsNew2Day
Latest News And Breaking Headlines

Coronavirus US: Health professionals share their fears about COVID-19

Health professionals across the country have opened up about what COVID-19 means to them and their families while sharing their fears surrounding the new virus.

As part of Cut.coms A word video series, doctors, nurses and other medical professionals were asked to name the first word they think of when they hear ‘COVID-19’.

“The first thing that comes to mind is fear – even though I don’t really want to be that,” admitted a New York City detective.

Scroll down for video

Thoughts: Medical professionals across the country across the country were asked to name the first word they think of when they hear 'COVID-19' as part of Cut.com's One Word series

Thoughts: Medical professionals across the country across the country were asked to name the first word they think of when they hear ‘COVID-19’ as part of Cut.com’s One Word series

Horrifying: A respiratory therapist in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma said someone threatened to shoot one of her colleagues at the disease

Horrifying: A respiratory therapist in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma said someone threatened to shoot one of her colleagues at the disease

Horrifying: A respiratory therapist in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma said someone threatened to shoot one of her colleagues at the disease

An EMT from Staten Island, New York, said that the disease reminds her of the word “difficult” as she shares what it has been like for her to treat coronavirus positive patients.

“I get at least three COVID potential or positive patients a day,” she explained. “It just got normal now. I’ve had them every day for the past two months. ‘

She lives with her autistic mother and brother, and while she doesn’t want to make them sick, she admitted that isolating herself from them has taken a heavy toll on her family.

“They’ll stay upstairs. I stay in my basement. If I get it, I get it. You know, I don’t care. I just don’t want my family to have it, ”she said. “My brother has autism. He’s in such a routine that he knows he sees me every day, and it’s heartbreaking because I break that routine. ‘

Honestly, “The first thing that comes to my mind is fear – even though I don’t really want to be that,” admitted a New York City detective

Candid: An EMT from Staten Island, New York, said the disease reminds her of the word “difficult” as she shares what it’s been like for her treatment of coronavirus positive patients

Hard to Handle: A NICU nurse in Seattle, Washington admitted she's 'nervous' because she should be attending her 'dream' grade school in the fall

Hard to Handle: A NICU nurse in Seattle, Washington admitted she's 'nervous' because she should be attending her 'dream' grade school in the fall

Hard to Handle: A NICU nurse in Seattle, Washington admitted she’s ‘nervous’ because she should be attending her ‘dream’ grade school in the fall

A patient access representative in Seattle, Washington, said COVID-19 is “unpredictable,” noting that she may have the disease and not know it.

“I was sent home from work today because I actually had a mild fever and had no idea,” she explained. “I was completely fine, but they sent me away and told me to go home.

She said if her fever lasts longer than four days, she will need to be tested.

“I’m not looking forward to that,” she admitted.

A Seattle hospital nurse bluntly said that COVID-19 is **** y, which her grandfather recently died of the new virus.

Global crisis: a resident of radiology from Providence. Rhode Island, said COVID-19 reminds her of 'chaos'

Global crisis: a resident of radiology from Providence. Rhode Island, said COVID-19 reminds her of 'chaos'

Global crisis: a resident of radiology from Providence. Rhode Island, said COVID-19 reminds her of ‘chaos’

Life-changing pandemic: a hospice nurse from Grand Rapids, Michigan said the coronavirus is 'unknown'

Life-changing pandemic: a hospice nurse from Grand Rapids, Michigan said the coronavirus is 'unknown'

Life-changing pandemic: a hospice nurse from Grand Rapids, Michigan said the coronavirus is ‘unknown’

“I lost my grandfather to COVID-19 a few weeks ago, and it was probably one of the worst experiences in my family’s life … that I couldn’t be there for him,” she said. “For him to just go out like that was damn good.”

Her grandfather’s death made her even more aware of the fact that she could potentially spread the deadly disease without knowing it.

“As a nurse who has to do my job, we may be the cause or the cause of death,” she said. “We are weapons. We run biological weapons. ‘

An anesthesiology native in Los Angeles, California, admitted that COVID-19 is simply “overwhelming” to him while looking for the best ways to treat patients.

“This has completely changed the paradigm,” he said. ‘[I am] learn on the fly what works and what doesn’t. And at the same time, people quickly lose their lives. It was a challenge. ‘

Worried: A patient representative in Seattle, Washington worried she has COVID-19 after being sent home from work with a mild fever

Worried: A patient representative in Seattle, Washington worried she has COVID-19 after being sent home from work with a mild fever

Worried: A patient representative in Seattle, Washington worried she has COVID-19 after being sent home from work with a mild fever

Grief: A Seattle hospital nurse bluntly said that COVID-19 is ***, which her grandfather recently died of the new virus.

Grief: A Seattle hospital nurse bluntly said that COVID-19 is ***, which her grandfather recently died of the new virus.

Grief: A Seattle hospital nurse bluntly said that COVID-19 is ***, which her grandfather recently died of the new virus.

Will it end: “The world will return to normal, but I think people will unfortunately continue to die from this virus,” said a CNA in Valrico, Florida.

In addition to the stress of treating patients and trying to protect their families, health professionals – like everyone else – are faced with having to postpone their lives amid the pandemic.

“On a selfish level, I’m nervous about going to high school at my dream school in the fall,” said a NICU nurse in Seattle. “It feels like this will never end and the changes are so constant that it is now tumultuous.”

Meanwhile, a respiratory therapist in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, said someone was threatening to shoot one of her colleagues about the disease.

“I work in the emergency room, so we are the front line,” she explained. “We actually had someone under threat in the healthcare industry because we were the reason why COVID is one thing.”

Statistics: As of Friday, there are more than a million confirmed cases of coronavirus in the United States and more than 63,000 deaths

Statistics: As of Friday, there are more than a million confirmed cases of coronavirus in the United States and more than 63,000 deaths

Statistics: As of Friday, there are more than a million confirmed cases of coronavirus in the United States and more than 63,000 deaths

She said the woman was in her scrubs at the time, and that after the incident, hospital staff were advised to work in their street clothes for their “safety.”

A few interviewees admitted that they are not sure what will happen when and if the pandemic ends.

“Are we going to return to our normal lives? Are we still going to be very careful about what we touch and how we interact? asked a CNA in Los Angeles.

Meanwhile, a CNA in Valrico, Florida admitted she doesn’t just see the coronavirus disappear.

“Is it ever really over? The real question is, is it really ever over? she asked. “Yes, the world will return to normal, but I think people will unfortunately continue to die from this virus.”

.

Comments
Loading...