Coronavirus: US heads of health root out bold claim that ‘vaccinated people don’t carry the virus’

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The US health agency harked back to a bold statement by the director that “vaccinated people do not carry the virus” and said she “spoke broadly.”

Dr. Rochelle Walensky, head of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, said in a TV interview this week, “ Vaccinated people don’t carry the virus, don’t get sick, and that’s not just in the clinical trials, but data from the real world. ‘

The CDC has now distanced itself from the claim by issuing a statement that “ the evidence is not clear ” and by saying the director made a generalization in her interview.

The health agency, which has roughly the same role as Public Health England, released a study this week that found that Pfizer and Moderna injections prevent about 90 percent of coronavirus infections.

Vaccines work well and protect people, experts say, but people were urged to “ don’t think for a second that they can’t get infected ” after being stung.

Dr. Walensky’s comments are not supported by evidence that the Pfizer and Moderna jabs can stop transmission completely – that claim has not been made about a vaccine, although most of the vaccines tested, including those from AstraZeneca, seem serious. to decrease. No vaccine is 100 percent perfect, and people will inevitably still get sick after injections.

The warning echoes comments made today by British Prime Minister Boris Johnson, who said in a Q&A that vaccinated people still cannot meet in-house under social distance laws because the jabs “ do not provide people with 100 percent protection. ‘.

CDC chief Dr.  Rochelle Walensky said in a US TV interview that people who have had a Covid vaccine 'do not get sick', but her own agency has refuted the claim, saying 'the evidence is not clear'

CDC chief Dr. Rochelle Walensky said in a US TV interview that people who have had a Covid vaccine ‘do not get sick’, but her own agency has refuted the claim, saying ‘the evidence is not clear’

A study published by the organization, full name Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, found this week that Pfizer and Moderna vaccines seem to prevent 90 percent of all infections, including those without symptoms, which experts say is hoping that they will prevent the most transfer will stop - but not all and not permanently.  (Pictured: A man was vaccinated today with the Moderna shot in Athens, Greece)

A study published by the organization, full name Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, found this week that Pfizer and Moderna vaccines seem to prevent 90 percent of all infections, including those without symptoms, which experts say is hoping that they will prevent the most transfer will stop - but not all and not permanently.  (Pictured: A man was vaccinated today with the Moderna shot in Athens, Greece)

A study published by the organization, full name Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, found this week that Pfizer and Moderna vaccines seem to prevent 90 percent of all infections, including those without symptoms, which experts say is hoping that they will prevent the most transfer will stop – but not all and not permanently. (Pictured: A man was vaccinated today with the Moderna shot in Athens, Greece)

A CDC spokesman said New York Times: ‘Dr. Walensky spoke widely during this interview.

It’s possible that some fully vaccinated people will get Covid-19.

The evidence is not clear whether they can spread the virus to others. We continue to evaluate the evidence. ‘

Dr. Walensky did not elaborate on her comment, but admitted later in the interview that it was vital for the US to reduce transmission with social aloofness while the vaccines were rolled out.

However, the CDC released a study this week that found the Moderna and Pfizer vaccines seem to stop 90 percent of all coronavirus infections, including those that don’t cause symptoms.

The study, conducted on 3,950 key employees in the US, of whom 2,956 received a vaccine, tested people every week for three months for coronavirus.

It found that the cases tumbled 90 percent in people who were fully immunized and 80 percent after a single dose.

While it couldn’t prove that people who don’t test positive can’t spread the virus, scientists hope it will.

A test looks for detectable levels of virus in the airways, and if there are none, it is unlikely that anyone can spread the disease to someone else, even if it is in their body in small amounts.

The CDC paper said: “The findings supplement and expand these previous reports by showing that the vaccines can also reduce the risk of infection, regardless of the status of Covid-19-associated disease symptoms.

Reducing the risk of transmissible infection, which can occur in individuals with an asymptomatic infection or in individuals several days before symptoms start, is especially important for health care personnel, first responders, and other key and frontline workers, given their potential to infect the virus. frequent close contact with patients and the public. ‘

Experts were concerned that Dr. Walensky’s comment, or comments like it, would give people false confidence that the vaccines were a panacea.

And it could also raise criticism that governments are not completely open about evidence or jump to conclusions – that saying that vaccines stop all infections was a big step forward from vaccines that stopped most infections.

Dr. Paul Duprex, a vaccine researcher at the University of Pittsburgh in Pennsylvania, told the New York Times, “It’s much harder for vaccinated people to get infected, but don’t think for a second that they can’t get infected.”

He added: ‘It is clear that some vaccinated people are becoming infected.

“We stop symptoms, we keep people out of hospitals, but we don’t make them completely resistant to infection.”

Trials of the Oxford University / AstraZeneca vaccine, which is probably the world’s most widely used shot by the time the pandemic is over, suggest it can significantly reduce the rate of virus transmission.

AstraZeneca’s own study published in February found that the shot prevented about two-thirds of all infections – 67 percent – when people were tested regularly.

The company said, “The analysis showed that the vaccine can reduce asymptomatic transmission of the virus.”

While the vaccines do not protect against all infections, most results have shown 100 percent protection against serious illness and death.