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Coronavirus UK: Tech boss, 40, describes deaths in intensive care

A 40-year-old tech boss has told how he watched helplessly as two patients died in front of him as he fought coronavirus in intensive care.

Jozef Wallis, a fit and healthy father-of-two, began feeling ill after a night out in the pubs around London Bridge station two weeks ago.

Despite suffering a raging fever and an uncontrollable cough which left him gasping for air he battled the illness at home for a week, as he didn’t want to “be a burden and clog up the NHS”.

But he was eventually transferred by ambulance to St Thomas’s Hospital in London – where Britain’s first Covid-19 patients were taken – and treated in the intensive care unit (ICU) after his health deteriorated.

In hospital he saw first hand fellow patients dying on the specialist coronavirus ward where he was cared for.

Jozef Wallis, a 40-year-old tech boss, has told how he watched helplessly as two patients died in front of him as he fought coronavirus in intensive care

Jozef Wallis, a 40-year-old tech boss, has told how he watched helplessly as two patients died in front of him as he fought coronavirus in intensive care

The healthy father-of-two, began feeling ill after a night out in London Bridge station two weeks ago. Despite suffering a raging fever and a cough which left him gasping for air he battled the illness at home for a week, as he didn’t want to “be a burden and clog up the NHS”

Now Mr Wallis, whose tech firm faces ruin because of the crisis, has urged everyone to stay at home and stop socializing in a bid to halt the spread of the virus.

He told MailOnline: “Two patients on my ward died before my eyes.

“One old man had to have assisted breathing and then I didn’t see him again. A nurse told me he had died.

“Another man was rushed into intensive care but he didn’t make it.

“He was old and had other medical conditions but he was someone’s granddad, someone’s dad, someone’s husband. He will be missed.

“We’ve all got to take this more seriously. You can’t have a party and you can’t meet up with friends. Otherwise more people will die. ‘

Mr Wallis, from Rotherhithe, was discharged on Monday night after spending five days in hospital and is now in isolation at home with wife Emma and daughters Tatiana, 8, and Anastasia, 6.

And he has revealed the darkest moments of his illness.

He told MailOnline: “About two weeks ago I started feeling unwell. I had aches in my joints and I was feeling light-headed.

“I thought it was just the wear and tear of a busy life and I went out that night with a few friends in a few pubs around London Bridge.

He was taken to St Thomas’s Hospital in London and treated in the intensive care unit (ICU) after his health deteriorated. In hospital he saw first hand fellow patients dying on the specialist coronavirus ward where he was cared for

He was taken to St Thomas’s Hospital in London and treated in the intensive care unit (ICU) after his health deteriorated. In hospital he saw first hand fellow patients dying on the specialist coronavirus ward where he was cared for

He was taken to St Thomas’s Hospital in London and treated in the intensive care unit (ICU) after his health deteriorated. In hospital he saw first hand fellow patients dying on the specialist coronavirus ward where he was cared for

He told MailOnline: “He was old and had other medical conditions but he was someone’s granddad, someone’s dad, someone’s husband. He will be missed ‘

“By the time I got home I had uncontrollable shivers going up and down my body, leading to a significant fever.

“I started coughing and sometimes I was coughing so much I was gasping for air.

“This went on for eight days.

“I did not call 111 [NHS helpline] because I did not want to be a burden and clog up the NHS system.

“My wife Emma looked after me and she was worried. I was isolated from the rest of the family. I was in a separate bedroom and used a separate bathroom.

“My mother and my in-laws were all very worried.

“I had to tell my mum as much as I love you the last thing I want to do is to see you as I could I put you in danger.

“I did some research online and I was convinced I had coronavirus symptoms.

“But I thought I just have to man up and deal with it.

“After eight days we decided we need to call a doctor. We called 111 and went online but we couldn’t get through.

“So I contacted a private doctor service and I had a video consultation. The doctor told me to call an ambulance.

“The paramedics decided to take me to St Thomas’s Hospital, into intensive care.

“I was given fluids, antibiotics, had chest x-rays and oxygen and tested for Covid-19.

“It took a long time for the results to come back, 30 hours.

Mr Wallis has praised the NHS staff for his care but claimed the after-care as “muddled”. He said: “The hospital staff were exceptional, all of them. But I don’t know how long I should isolate for. I don’t know if I’m now immune, if I still have it or if I can pass it on ‘

“But when I came back positive I was moved to a Covid ward with six beds, with five other patients.

“I knew I was gravely ill but I never thought I was going to die.

“I didn’t touch the phone or send an email for ten days, which is unheard of.

“But two patients on my ward died before my eyes.

“I stayed there for three days until I was discharged on Monday night.”

Mr Wallis has praised the NHS staff for his care but claimed the after-care as “muddled”.

He said: “The quality of the care was excellent. The hospital staff were exceptional, all of them – nurses, doctors and consultants – in every single way.

“I want to thank them hugely. They are utterly heroic. We should be very proud of our NHS.

“But the hospital after-care has been a bit muddled.

“I don’t know how long I should isolate for. I don’t know if I’m now immune, if I still have it or if I can pass it on.

‘I feel 100 per cent better. I’ve come through the other side but there’s a chance of my business will go bankrupt. ”

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