WhatsNew2Day
Latest News And Breaking Headlines

Coronavirus panic leaves the Chinatown in London almost empty

Chinatown in London is eerily abandoned while thousands of revelers keep their distance from the tourist spot while the panic of coronavirus engulfs the UK.

The normally busy restaurants are empty after Britain’s ninth confirmed case of the virus, a woman traveling from China, became the first in London.

The total number of Britons tested for the disease last month has risen to 2,512.

The streets of central London are usually suitable for bursting with visitors wanting to taste the kitchen or browse the Chinese supermarkets, but the sidewalks were nearly bare and the seats remained open between 9 p.m. and 10 p.m. disease – which originated in Wuhan, China – is growing.

The ninth case of Great Britain was determined on Wednesday. The victim, a woman, is currently being treated for the disease at Guy and St. Thomas’s hospital in South London.

She is thought to have flown from China to the UK, with officials confirming that she contracted the virus in China.

Yesterday it appeared that more than 750 British patients were tested for the disease, which occurred in just one day in Wuhan, China.

None of the 763 people tested had the disease, but the extraordinary figure – the highest in a day so far – reflects the growing public concern.

Further concerns were expressed yesterday after the NHS officials admitted that the newest patient with the virus had come to a busy A&E unit in a Uber taxi.

Chinatown in London is eerily abandoned while thousands of revelers keep their distance from the tourist spot while corona virus sweeps panic across the UK

Chinatown in London is eerily abandoned while thousands of revelers keep their distance from the tourist spot while corona virus sweeps panic across the UK

The normally busy streets - decorated with hanging lanterns - are almost empty after the ninth confirmed case of the virus, a woman traveling from China became the first in London

The normally busy streets - decorated with hanging lanterns - are almost empty after the ninth confirmed case of the virus, a woman traveling from China became the first in London

The normally busy streets – decorated with hanging lanterns – are almost empty after the ninth confirmed case of the virus, a woman traveling from China became the first in London

Recent research has shown that 14 percent of Britons said they would avoid contact with people of Chinese descent or appearance because of fear of coronavirus. Pictured: the streets were almost empty when lanterns hung between buildings in Chinatown in London

Recent research has shown that 14 percent of Britons said they would avoid contact with people of Chinese descent or appearance because of fear of coronavirus. Pictured: the streets were almost empty when lanterns hung between buildings in Chinatown in London

Recent research has shown that 14 percent of Britons said they would avoid contact with people of Chinese descent or appearance because of fear of coronavirus. Pictured: the streets were almost empty when lanterns hung between buildings in Chinatown in London

The sidewalks were almost bare and the seats remained unfulfilled as public concern about the disease - which originated in Wuhan, China - grows

The sidewalks were almost bare and the seats remained unfulfilled as public concern about the disease - which originated in Wuhan, China - grows

The sidewalks were almost bare and the seats remained unfulfilled as public concern about the disease – which originated in Wuhan, China – grows

With streets of central London location usually suited to bursting with visitors wanting to sample the variety of restaurants or browse the Chinese supermarkets, a grim picture painted last night

With streets of central London location usually suited to bursting with visitors wanting to sample the variety of restaurants or browse the Chinese supermarkets, a grim picture painted last night

With streets of central London location usually suited to bursting with visitors wanting to sample the variety of restaurants or browse the Chinese supermarkets, a grim picture painted last night

The ninth case of Great Britain was determined on Wednesday. The victim, a woman, is currently being treated for the disease at Guy and St. Thomas's hospital in South London. Pictured: the streets of Chinatown in London saw almost no pedestrians yesterday amid widespread corona virus fears

The ninth case of Great Britain was determined on Wednesday. The victim, a woman, is currently being treated for the disease at Guy and St. Thomas's hospital in South London. Pictured: the streets of Chinatown in London saw almost no pedestrians yesterday amid widespread corona virus fears

The ninth case of Great Britain was determined on Wednesday. The victim, a woman, is currently being treated for the disease at Guy and St. Thomas’s hospital in South London. Pictured: the streets of Chinatown in London saw almost no pedestrians yesterday amid widespread corona virus fears

Hardly any visitors came to Chinatown last night because the fear of spreading deadly corona virus - which originated in Wuhan, China - is growing

Hardly any visitors came to Chinatown last night because the fear of spreading deadly corona virus - which originated in Wuhan, China - is growing

Hardly any visitors came to Chinatown last night because the fear of spreading deadly corona virus – which originated in Wuhan, China – is growing

It was revealed today that one of the nine confirmed coronavirus cases in Great Britain attended a bus conference in Westminster just a stone’s throw from parliament.

The virus carrier was reportedly one of the 250 delegates at the UK Bus Summit at the QEII Center on February 6, whose main speaker was Boris Johnson’s Buses Minister, Baroness Vere of Norbiton.

The patient’s presence in central London at a full conference will evoke fear among the hundreds of people there from the transport sector amid the spread of coronavirus.

Yesterday one General practice in Islington, North London, was abruptly closed after a corona virus.

Cleaners wearing protective clothing were depicted scrubbing the Ritchie Street Health Center near Angel metro station.

In Worthing, West Sussex, mother Stephanie Adlam, 28, today told how she was “terrified” of her baby, James, after a doctor with the virus had treated her baby for an injured leg.

The mother of two is now panicking while waiting for her boy’s test results.

She said The sun that he developed symptoms with the addition: ‘I have to live every moment and wonder if he might die.

The disease has killed 1,383 worldwide while the number of cases exceeded 64,000.

Three in ten Britons said they would avoid large groups of people or travel by air to go on vacation, while two-thirds said they would consider staying away from contaminated countries or territories. Pictured: an almost deserted restaurant in Chinatown. There is no suggestion that restaurant staff are infected by the virus

Three in ten Britons said they would avoid large groups of people or travel by air to go on vacation, while two-thirds said they would consider staying away from contaminated countries or territories. Pictured: an almost deserted restaurant in Chinatown. There is no suggestion that restaurant staff are infected by the virus

Three in ten Britons said they would avoid large groups of people or travel by air to go on vacation, while two-thirds said they would consider staying away from contaminated countries or territories. Pictured: an almost deserted restaurant in Chinatown. There is no suggestion that restaurant staff are infected by the virus

A Chinatown restaurant is almost empty amid widespread fears of coronavirus. There is no suggestion that restaurant staff are infected by the virus

A Chinatown restaurant is almost empty amid widespread fears of coronavirus. There is no suggestion that restaurant staff are infected by the virus

A Chinatown restaurant is almost empty amid widespread fears of coronavirus. There is no suggestion that restaurant staff are infected by the virus

Su Chu Lu, market stallholder from Wales, had been to Taiwan - an island off the coast of China - to visit her family, but when she returned neighbors had turned against her. Pictured: almost deserted restaurant in Chinatown. There is no suggestion that restaurant staff are infected by the virus

Su Chu Lu, market stallholder from Wales, had been to Taiwan - an island off the coast of China - to visit her family, but when she returned neighbors had turned against her. Pictured: almost deserted restaurant in Chinatown. There is no suggestion that restaurant staff are infected by the virus

The last case is because all 83 people who were quarantined at the Arrowe Park Hospital in the Wirral were declared free of the virus and could leave their accommodation. Pictured: an abandoned restaurant in Chinatown in London. There is no suggestion that restaurant staff are infected by the virus

The last case is because all 83 people who were quarantined at the Arrowe Park Hospital in the Wirral were declared free of the virus and could leave their accommodation. Pictured: an abandoned restaurant in Chinatown in London. There is no suggestion that restaurant staff are infected by the virus

The last case is because all 83 people who were quarantined at the Arrowe Park Hospital in the Wirral were declared free of the virus and could leave their accommodation. On the photo: restaurants in Chinatown are almost empty. There is no suggestion that restaurant staff are infected by the virus

The first confirmed case of London from China is thought to have flown in from the UK, with officials confirming that it contracted the virus in China. Depicted: restaurants remained almost deserted amid great panic. There is no suggestion that restaurant staff are infected by the virus

The first confirmed case of London from China is thought to have flown in from the UK, with officials confirming that it contracted the virus in China. Depicted: restaurants remained almost deserted amid great panic. There is no suggestion that restaurant staff are infected by the virus

The first confirmed case of London from China is thought to have flown in from the UK, with officials confirming that it contracted the virus in China. Depicted: restaurants remained almost deserted amid great panic. There is no suggestion that restaurant staff are infected by the virus

Another almost empty restaurant in Chinatown after virus fear. There is no suggestion that restaurant staff are infected by the virus

Another almost empty restaurant in Chinatown after virus fear. There is no suggestion that restaurant staff are infected by the virus

Another almost empty restaurant in Chinatown after virus fear. There is no suggestion that restaurant staff are infected by the virus

Chinatown is located in central London, close to Trafalgar Square and Covent Garden tourist hotspots

Chinatown is located in central London, close to Trafalgar Square and Covent Garden tourist hotspots

Chinatown is located in central London, close to Trafalgar Square and Covent Garden tourist hotspots

The Wuhan 83 are finally out! Coronavirus evacuees leave the quarantine and are isolated for a pint after 14 days

The 83 Britons who were quarantined in a NHS unit in Merseyside due to corona virus anxiety, started to leave yesterday after a negative test for the deadly virus after a 14-day isolation stint.

Matt Raw was the first evacue from the Chinese city of Wuhan, the center of the escalating outbreak that left Arrowe Park Hospital today.

The 38-year-old from Knutsford, Cheshire, hit the sky and shouted ‘we are free and the sun is shining’. He joked that he would go home to feed his goldfish and “would undoubtedly eat a beer later.”

Buses full of excited Brits pictured smiling and with their thumbs up have since seen boarding trains at Lime Street station in Liverpool and being dropped off at the Wirral.

Health officials confirmed that the entire group – who had signed a contract to quarantine them when they landed in RAF Brize Norton on Friday, January 31 – had tested negative for the murderer SARS-CoV-2 virus.

Recent research has shown that 14 percent of Britons said they would avoid contact with people of Chinese descent or appearance because of fear of coronavirus.

A quarter said they would avoid shaking hands with each other, and one in five said they would all avoid traveling by public transport, the Ipsos MORI poll said.

Three out of ten said they would avoid large groups of people or travel by air to go on vacation, while two-thirds said they would consider staying away from contaminated countries or territories.

Chinatowns around the world have also seen an impact after widespread fears.

A popular restaurant in Chinatown in Melbourne, Australia, was forced to close its doors after three decades as customers left the eatery because of the fear of catching the deadly virus.

Shark Fin House was opened in 1989 and co-owner Gabriel Chan was forced to announce the closure this week.

Many have slammed racist reactions to outburst fears.

Parents have claimed that Chinese children are banned by their friends at British schools, and some refuse to play with them.

Mothers have told the BBC that people are ‘racist’ towards the young because of an ‘unfair’ perception that the outbreak is a Chinese virus.

Meanwhile, blogger Jex Wang has claimed that people on public transport ‘move’ from people of East Asian descent, making her ‘anxious’ to leave the house.

And a 54-year-old Taiwanese stall stand in Aberystwyth, West Wales, said other exhibitors were trying to lure her away and told her to “go home.”

Su Chu Lu, market stallholder from Wales, had been to Taiwan – an island off the coast of China – to visit her family, but when she returned neighbors had turned against her.

Chinatowns around the world have also seen an impact after widespread fears. Shark Fin House in Melbourne, Australia, was forced to close its doors after three decades as customers left the eatery because of the fear of catching the deadly virus

Chinatowns around the world have also seen an impact after widespread fears. Shark Fin House in Melbourne, Australia, was forced to close its doors after three decades as customers left the eatery because of the fear of catching the deadly virus

Chinatowns around the world have also seen an impact after widespread fears. Shark Fin House in Melbourne, Australia, was forced to close its doors after three decades as customers left the eatery because of the fear of catching the deadly virus

More than 60,000 infections have now been confirmed and more than 1,300 people have died. Almost all cases and deaths remain in China

A man wears a protective face mask while wandering through nearly deserted Chinatown amid growing panic about the corona virus

A man wears a protective face mask while wandering through nearly deserted Chinatown amid growing panic about the corona virus

A man wears a protective face mask while wandering through nearly deserted Chinatown amid growing panic about the corona virus

Another restaurant in Chinatown is almost deserted. There is no suggestion that restaurant staff are infected by the virus

Another restaurant in Chinatown is almost deserted. There is no suggestion that restaurant staff are infected by the virus

None of the 763 people who were tested for coronavirus in one day had the disease, but the extraordinary figure – the highest in a day so far – reflects the growing public concern. Pictured: a restaurant in Chinatown that was almost empty last night. There is no suggestion that restaurant staff are infected by the virus

February 13 saw a sharp peak in the number of coronavirus cases because doctors in China changed the way they diagnose the disease

February 13 saw a sharp peak in the number of coronavirus cases because doctors in China changed the way they diagnose the disease

A total of 1,369 people died in the outbreak

A total of 1,369 people died in the outbreak

February 13 saw a sharp peak in the number of coronavirus cases because doctors in China changed the way they diagnose the disease

CORONAVIRUS: WHAT WE KNOW AGAIN

What is this virus?

The virus has been identified as a new type of corona virus. Coronaviruses are a large family of pathogens, most of which cause mild lung infections, such as the common cold.

But coronaviruses can also be deadly. SARS, or severe acute respiratory syndrome, is caused by a corona virus and killed hundreds of people in China and Hong Kong in the early 2000s.

Can the Wuhan coronavirus kill?

Yes – 1,383 people have died so far after a positive test for the virus.

What are the symptoms?

Some people who get the Wuhan coronavirus have no symptoms at all, or only very mild ones such as sore throat or headache.

Others may suffer from fever, cough or breathing problems.

And a small proportion of patients will develop a serious infection that can damage the lungs or cause pneumonia, a life-threatening condition that causes swelling and fluid retention in the lungs.

How is it detected?

The genetic sequencing of the virus has been released by scientists in China and countries around the world have used this to make laboratory tests that must be performed to confirm an infection.

Delays in these tests, in test results and in people going to hospitals in China mean that the number of confirmed cases is expected to be only a fraction of the actual extent of the outbreak.

How did it start and spread?

The first cases identified were people connected to the Huanan Seafood Wholesale Market in Wuhan.

Cases have since been identified throughout China and have been known to spread from person to person.

What do countries do to prevent spread?

Countries around the world have forbidden foreign travelers from crossing their borders if they have been to China in the last two weeks. Many airlines have canceled or drastically reduced flights to and from mainland China.

Is it similar to something we’ve ever seen before?

Experts compared it to the outbreak of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) in 2003. The epidemic started in South China and killed more than 700 people in mainland China, Hong Kong and elsewhere.

SCROLL DOWN TO SEE FULL Q&A OF MAILONLINE ON THE CORONAVIRUS

She said that a group of them had held a meeting and decided to try to prohibit her from returning to her booth because of the fear that they “would all risk” catching the virus.

Mrs. Lu became upset and refused to leave unless the authorities had instructed her. Other traders gathered by her side and even hung up posters that said she could stay.

Another insisted that it was not racist and they would have said the same thing if they had been somewhere else where an illness broke out.

The first human cases of the corona virus were publicly reported from the Chinese city of Wuhan, where about 11 million people live, after doctors first started seeing infections on December 31.

On January 8, 59 suspected cases were reported and seven people were in critical condition. Tests were developed for the new virus and registered cases began to rise.

The first person died that week and on January 16, two were dead and 41 cases were confirmed. The next day, scientists predicted that 1,700 people were infected, possibly up to 7,000.

Only a week later there had been more than 800 confirmed cases and those same scientists estimate that around 4,000 – possibly 9,700 – had been infected in Wuhan alone. At that time, 26 people had died.

Since then, the disease has spread to several countries, including Russia, India, Singapore and Italy.

Health Minister Matt Hancock said earlier this week that the coronavirus outbreak is a “serious and imminent” threat to the British public.

The last case is because all 83 people who were quarantined at the Arrowe Park Hospital in the Wirral were declared free of the virus and could leave their accommodation.

The prisoners – who were being held in an apartment building – were all tested and were found not to have the virus.

Two British prisoners – including a “drug dealer” sent home from Thailand – were found not to have a corona virus.

Mark Rumble, 31, from Oxfordshire, was sent to HMP Bullingdon, close to Bicester, on January 27 and is confronted with a series of conspiracy allegations to deliver class A and B drugs. He must appear in court later this month and is expected to deny the charge.

The Thailand ministry claimed that Mr. Rumble had no symptoms of the unprecedented virus when he was tested before returning to the UK.

And it said he had passed all the standard health checks that prisoners undergo before being extradited, claiming that he would not have been allowed to travel if he had failed.

Officials in Thailand, the first country outside of China to register a case on January 13, claim that there have been no cases among the 300,000 prisoners in the country.

It also occurs when the ‘super-spreader’ of Brighton coronavirus revealed that he is afraid of becoming a ‘national scapegoat’ after accidentally infecting 11 other Britons with the disease.

Gloomy photos of empty streets and restaurants contrasted sharply with this image, which was taken last year and shows a bustling Chinatown

Gloomy photos of empty streets and restaurants contrasted sharply with this image, which was taken last year and shows a bustling Chinatown

Gloomy photos of empty streets and restaurants contrasted sharply with this image, which was taken last year and shows a bustling Chinatown

Partygoers came to Chinatown last year and visited shops and restaurants in the evening. Bright shop windows illuminated the busy streets

Partygoers came to Chinatown last year and visited shops and restaurants in the evening. Bright shop windows illuminated the busy streets

Partygoers came to Chinatown last year and visited shops and restaurants in the evening. Bright shop windows illuminated the busy streets

Coronavirus panic in the capital: Fear of UBER that Chinese patient who tested positive went to London A&E – since 763 Britons are checked in one day, GP operations are scrubbed and tube passengers wear masks

Sophie Borland and James Tozer for the Daily Mail

More than 750 British patients were tested for coronavirus in one day while panic spread over the country.

None of the 763 people tested had the disease, but the extraordinary figure – the highest in a day so far – reflects the growing public concern.

Further concerns were expressed yesterday after NHS officials admitted that a woman with the virus had come to a busy A&E unit in a Uber taxi.

The patient – the ninth confirmed case in the UK and believed to be a Chinese citizen – arrived on Sunday evening at Lewisham Hospital in South London, in a major breach of health advice.

Two health workers who came into contact with the woman were told to isolate themselves and the Uber driver’s account was temporarily suspended.

Pictured: A man in a medical mask cleanses Thursday at Ritchie Street Health Center in Islington, North London

Pictured: A man in a medical mask cleanses Thursday at Ritchie Street Health Center in Islington, North London

Pictured: A man in a medical mask cleanses Thursday at Ritchie Street Health Center in Islington, North London

A tuber is wearing a face mask on a London underground train. It is unclear when the photo was taken, but it was posted on Twitter today with the caption: “When coronavirus hits London”

Public Health England’s official opinion states that anyone suspected of having coronavirus should stay at home, call NHS 111 and wait for transportation to the nearest pod of the hospital.

Coronavirus victim appeared at Lewisham A&E in a UBER

By Martin Robinson, Rory Tingle and Sam Blanchard for MailOnline

London’s first coronavirus victim went to A&E in an Uber on Sunday, it was announced.

The woman, presumably in her twenties or thirties and living with family in London, had contracted the virus in China and fell ill after flying to Heathrow over the weekend.

After taking herself to A&E in Lewisham, southeast London, she was tested and sent home for three days before the results returned positive.

The hospital said no patients were approaching her and confirmed that two nurses who did were at home in seclusion in case they begin to feel ill.

The patient’s behavior went against official advice to stay home and call 111 to prevent the disease from spreading, The Guardian reported.

She is now being treated at St. Thomas Hospital in central London, one of four in the country with specialized units for infectious diseases.

The patient was the first case in London and doctors fear that the rise of the disease in the capital will cause it to spread quickly.

Dr. Robin Thompson, an expert in mathematical epidemiology at Oxford University, said: “In general, the risk of long-term transmission from person to person is greater if the first case is in a densely populated area.

“This is exacerbated by the fact that London is a transport hub and the metro can provide a network for spreading the virus quickly.”

Yesterday morning paramedics in hazmat suits came to a flat in Paddington, central London, after a patient had reported symptoms.

Video footage shows a man in a black hoodie walking in an ambulance at 9.45 am with two staff members in full body coats.

Elsewhere, two general practices were closed after patients with suspicious symptoms showed up unannounced.

The Ritchie Street Health Center in Islington, North London, posted a message on its website that it would be closed until today “due to the corona virus.”

The Ferns Medical Practice in Farnham, Surrey, said it was a deep cleanup after a patient came in after a visit to “one of the affected coronavirus areas.”

Approximately 2,512 people in the UK have been tested since last month. Patients with a suspected corona virus have taken cotton swabs from their noses and throats that have been sent to one of the 12 UK laboratories, including London, Cambridge, Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland.

Pictured: signs on the door of the Ritchie Street Health Center, Islington, North London, which is closed 'due to operational problems'

Pictured: signs on the door of the Ritchie Street Health Center, Islington, North London, which is closed 'due to operational problems'

Pictured: signs on the door of the Ritchie Street Health Center, Islington, North London, which is closed ‘due to operational problems’

The results usually come back within 48 hours – although they can be reversed within 24 hours – and the NHS can test up to 1,000 patients a day.

Chief Medical Officer Professor Chris Whitty said officials hoped to delay the spread of the corona virus in this country until the summer.

He told Radio 4’s Today: “Delay is the next phase of what we have to do, because if we are going to get an outbreak in the UK – this is a if, not an when – but if we do it, put it back in time in the summer period, away from the winter pressure on the NHS, giving us a little more time to better understand the virus … is a big advantage. “

A photo shows the front of the Ritchie Street Group Practice health center in North London on February 13

A photo shows the front of the Ritchie Street Group Practice health center in North London on February 13

A photo shows the front of the Ritchie Street Group Practice health center in North London on February 13

He added that although it was “very likely” that the UK would see more cases, the disease could be “tempered” as the weather got warmer.

The head of NHS, Simon Stevens, said that many more patients at home should isolate themselves if they had suspicious symptoms to limit the spread.

He praised the coronavirus evacuees who left the Wirral yesterday after 14 days of isolation, and said that the ‘guests’ of Arrowe Park Hospital had set an important example because he acknowledged that many more of us should be isolating in the coming weeks. period to reduce the spread of this virus’.

Mother, 28, whose sick eight-month-old son was treated by the doctor from Sussex, who came down with corona virus, says she is now afraid that he and she BOTH may have it

By Sebastian Murphy-Bates for Mailonline

A mother whose sick eight-month-old son was being treated by a Sussex doctor who got coronavirus says she is now afraid that he has both.

Stephanie Adlam is “terrified” for her baby, James, after a doctor with the virus had treated her baby for a wounded leg.

The 28-year-old mother of two is now panicking while waiting for her boy’s test results.

She said The sun that he developed symptoms in Worthing, West Sussex, adding, “I have to live every moment and wonder if he might die.”

A doctor who worked for two days in the A&E department of Worthing Hospital has tested positive for the corona virus

A doctor who worked for two days in the A&E department of Worthing Hospital has tested positive for the corona virus

Een arts die twee dagen op de afdeling A&E van Worthing Hospital heeft gewerkt, heeft positief getest op het coronavirus

Adlam was geschokt toen dokters haar vertelden dat haar zoon ‘direct, belangrijk contact’ had met de besmette arts.

De ernstige symptomen van de jongere zijn een hoge temperatuur, hoestaanvallen, loopneus en extreme vermoeidheid.

De testresultaten worden morgen verwacht, wanneer ze zal ontdekken of hij het virus heeft.

De moeder en haar kind zitten in hun Worthing-flat en gebruiken beide maskers.

Werknemers in beschermende pakken in het County Oak Medical Center in Brighton op maandag nadat een huisarts in de praktijk werd gediagnosticeerd met het dodelijke virus

Ze beschuldigde het personeel van het Worthing Hospital ervan haar in de steek te hebben gelaten, omdat ze het risico hadden geïdentificeerd en haar hadden gezegd 111 te bellen als hun toestand verslechterde.

‘Het eerste dat door mijn hoofd gaat, is dat dit mij, mijn zoon, mijn ex-partner en dochter gaat vermoorden,’ zei ze.

Mevrouw Adlam smeet ook hoge ambtenaren in het ziekenhuis omdat ze niet bevestigde dat de A & E-werknemer eerder eerder positief had getest.

James, die ook hemofilie heeft, werd op 2 februari opgenomen voor een inwendige bloeding nadat hij ermee had geslagen.

Tijdens zijn verblijf van zeven dagen kwam hij in contact met de huisarts die later coronavirus bleek te hebben.

Een isolatiepod is afgebeeld in het Eastbourne District General Hospital in Sussex, 20 mijl ten westen van Brighton. NHS-bazen vertelden alle ziekenhuizen in Engeland om de isolatiecabines op te zetten van waaruit mensen waarvan wordt vermoed dat ze coronavirus hebben, telefonisch met gespecialiseerde artsen kunnen praten terwijl ze wegblijven van het grote publiek in het ziekenhuis

Een isolatiepod is afgebeeld in het Eastbourne District General Hospital in Sussex, 20 mijl ten westen van Brighton. NHS-bazen vertelden alle ziekenhuizen in Engeland om de isolatiecabines op te zetten van waaruit mensen waarvan wordt vermoed dat ze coronavirus hebben, telefonisch met gespecialiseerde artsen kunnen praten terwijl ze wegblijven van het grote publiek in het ziekenhuis

Een isolatiepod is afgebeeld in het Eastbourne District General Hospital in Sussex, 20 mijl ten westen van Brighton. NHS-bazen vertelden alle ziekenhuizen in Engeland om de isolatiecabines op te zetten van waaruit mensen waarvan wordt vermoed dat ze coronavirus hebben, telefonisch met gespecialiseerde artsen kunnen praten terwijl ze wegblijven van het grote publiek in het ziekenhuis

Mevrouw Adlam zei dat ze het ene moment het been liet controleren en het volgende moment potentiële slachtoffers waren van een virus dat wereldwijd mensen doodt. Het was Public Health England die haar thuis belde om haar te informeren dat ze gevaar liep.

Paramedici in hazmatpakken daalden binnen enkele minuten bij haar thuis en namen ze mee in een ambulance om te testen.

Nu moeten James en zijn vijf jaar oude zus, Fran, hun temperaturen om de twee uur laten controleren.

Hun vader, die de voormalige partner van mevrouw Adlam, Nick, is, zei dat het gezin in een hel is en volledig versteend is omdat niets de symptomen lijkt te verlichten.

They are so cut-off from the outside world that they only open the door to take food deliveries.

Dr Catriona Saynor, also known as Dr Greenwood, works freelance shifts at County Oak Medical Centre in Brighton, which was shut down this week

Dr Catriona Saynor, also known as Dr Greenwood, works freelance shifts at County Oak Medical Centre in Brighton, which was shut down this week

Steve Walsh, a gas salesman from Hove, was this week revealed to have unknowingly been the source of six out of the UK's eight coronavirus infections

Steve Walsh, a gas salesman from Hove, was this week revealed to have unknowingly been the source of six out of the UK's eight coronavirus infections

Dr Catriona Saynor (pictured left) works as a locum at County Oak Medical Centre in Brighton, which was shut down this week Steve Walsh, a gas salesman from Hove, was this week revealed to have unknowingly been the source of six out of the UK’s eight coronavirus infections – he and Dr Saynor had been on a family holiday together in France

The GP in question is from Brighton and had holidayed with ‘super-spreader’ Stephen Walsh.

Father-of-two Mr Walsh caught coronavirus in Singapore then unwittingly passed it onto 11 people – including a group of doctors – while skiing in France.

The doctor’s identity is being kept secret. Ms Adlam has urged the government and health bosses to act with more immediacy and get on top of the crisis.

A total of 2,521 people in Britain have been tested for coronavirus, with nine cases confirmed.

WHAT WE KNOW ABOUT THE DEADLY CORONAVIRUS IN CHINA?

Someone infected with the corona virus can spread it with just a simple cough or sneeze, scientists say.

More than 1,380 people with the virus have now been confirmed to have died and more than 64,400 have been infected in at least 28 countries and regions. But experts predict that the actual number of people with the Wuhan disease alone can be 350,000 because they warn that in 100 cases it can kill as many as two. This is what we know so far:

What is the corona virus?

A corona virus is a type of virus that can cause disease in animals and humans. Viruses break into cells in their host and use them to reproduce themselves and disrupt the normal functions of the body. Coronaviruses are named after the Latin word “corona”, which means crown, because they are enveloped by a pointed shell that looks like a royal crown.

The corona virus from Wuhan is one that has never been seen before this outbreak. It has been named SARS-CoV-2 by the International Committee on Taxonomy of Viruses. The name stands for Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome coronavirus 2.

Experts say the bug, which has killed about one in 50 patients since the outbreak in December, is a “sister” to the SARS disease that hit China in 2002, and is therefore named after it.

The disease that causes the virus is called COVID-19, which stands for coronavirus disease 2019.

Dr. Helena Maier of the Pirbright Institute said: “Coronaviruses are a family of viruses that infect a wide range of different types, including humans, cattle, pigs, chickens, dogs, cats, and wildlife.

“Until this new coronavirus was identified, there were only six different coronaviruses that are known to infect humans. Four of these cause a mild, common cold, but two new coronaviruses have emerged since 2002 that can infect people and lead to more serious illnesses (Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) and Middle Eastern Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) Coronaviruses).

“Coronaviruses are known to occasionally jump from one species to another and that is what happened in the case of SARS, MERS and the new coronavirus. The animal origin of the new coronavirus is not yet known. ”

The first human cases were publicly reported from the Chinese city of Wuhan, where around 11 million people live, after physicians first publicly reported infections on December 31.

On January 8, 59 suspected cases were reported and seven people were in critical condition. Tests were developed for the new virus and registered cases began to rise.

The first person died that week and on January 16, two were dead and 41 cases were confirmed. The next day, scientists predicted that 1,700 people were infected, possibly up to 7,000.

Only a week later there had been more than 800 confirmed cases and those same scientists estimate that around 4,000 – possibly 9,700 – had been infected in Wuhan alone. At that time, 26 people had died.

On January 27, more than 2,800 people were infected, 81 had died, and estimates of the total number of cases ranged from 100,000 to 350,000 in Wuhan alone.

On January 29, the number of deaths had risen to 132 and the number was more than 6,000.

On February 5, there were more than 24,000 cases and 492 deaths.

On 11 February this had risen to more than 43,000 cases and 1,000 deaths.

A change in the way in which cases are confirmed on February 13 – doctors decided to use lung scans as a formal diagnosis, as well as laboratory tests – caused a peak in the number of cases, to more than 60,000 and to 1,369 deaths.

Where does the virus come from?

Scientists say the virus almost certainly comes from bats. Coronaviruses generally have a tendency to come from animals – it is thought that similar SARS and MERS viruses originated in civet cats and camels, respectively.

The first cases of COVID-19 came from people who visited or worked in a market for live animals in the city, which has since been closed for investigation.

Although the market is officially a fish market, other dead and live animals were sold there, including wolves, salamanders, snakes, peacocks, porcupines and camel meat.

A study by the Wuhan Institute of Virology, published in February 2020 in the scientific journal Nature, showed that the genetic makeup virus samples found in patients in China are 96 percent comparable to a corona virus found in bats.

However, there were not many bats on the market, so scientists say it was likely that there was an animal that acted as a middle man, pulling it out of a bat before handing it over to a human. It has not yet been confirmed what type of animal this was.

Dr. Michael Skinner, a virologist at Imperial College London, was not involved in the research, but said: “The discovery definitely explains the origins of nCoV in bats in China.

“We still don’t know if another species served as an intermediate host to strengthen the virus, and possibly even to bring it to market, nor what species that host could have been.”

Until now, the deaths are fairly low. Why do health experts worry so much about it?

Experts say that the international community is worried about the virus because so little is known about it and it seems to be spreading fast.

It is similar to SARS, which has infected 8,000 people and killed nearly 800 in an outbreak in Asia in 2003, in the sense that it is a type of corona virus that infects people’s lungs.

Another cause for concern is that nobody has immunity to the virus because they have never encountered it before. This means that it may cause more damage than viruses we often encounter, such as the flu or a cold.

Professor Peter Horby, professor at Oxford University, spoke during a briefing in January: “New viruses can spread through the population much faster than viruses circulating all the time because we are not immune to them.

“Most seasonal flu viruses have a death rate of less than one in 1,000 people. Here we are talking about a virus for which we do not fully understand the severity spectrum, but it is possible that the mortality rate can go up to two percent. “

If the death rate is really two percent, it means that two out of every 100 patients who get it will die.

“My feeling is that it’s lower,” Dr. added. Horby. “We probably miss this iceberg of milder things. But that is the current condition in which we find ourselves.

“Two percent of the fatal cases are comparable to the Spanish flu pandemic in 1918, so it is a major concern worldwide.”

How does the virus spread?

The disease can spread between people, only through coughing and sneezing, making it a highly contagious infection. And it can also spread before someone has symptoms.

It is believed that it travels in the saliva and even through water in the eyes, therefore close contact, kissing and parts of cutlery or utensils are all risky.

It was originally thought that people would catch a market for live animals in the city of Wuhan. But soon cases occurred to people who had never been there, so doctors had to realize that it spread from person to person.

There is now evidence that it can spread the third hand – to someone from a person who has caught it from another person.

What does the virus do to you? What are the symptoms?

Once someone has caught the COVID-19 virus, it can take two to 14 days, or even longer, before he or she shows symptoms, but they can still be contagious during this time.

When and when they get sick, typical symptoms are runny nose, cough, sore throat and fever (high temperature). The vast majority of patients – at least 97 percent based on available data – will recover without problems or medical assistance.

In a small group of patients, who appear to be mostly elderly or people with long-term illnesses, this can lead to pneumonia. Pneumonia is an infection in which the inside of the lungs swells and fills with fluid. It makes it increasingly difficult to breathe and, if not treated, can be fatal and suffocate.

What have genetic tests revealed about the virus?

Scientists in China have registered the genetic sequences of about 19 strains of the virus and released them to experts around the world.

This allows others to study them, develop tests and possibly look into the treatment of the disease they cause.

Research has shown that the coronavirus did not change much – change is known as mutating – much during the early stages of its spread.

The Director General of the Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Gao Fu, said, however, that the virus mutated and adapted as it spread through people.

This means that efforts to study and possibly control the virus can be made extra difficult because the virus can look different every time scientists analyze it.

More research can show whether the virus first infected a small number of people and then changes and spreads, or whether there are different versions of the virus from animals that have developed separately.

How dangerous is the virus?

The virus has so far killed 1,383 people out of a total of at least 64,441 officially confirmed cases – a death rate of around two percent. This is a similar death rate to the Spanish flu outbreak that killed around 50 million people in 1918.

However, experts say that the actual number of patients is probably considerably higher and therefore the mortality rate is considerably lower. Researchers at Imperial College London estimate that there were 4,000 cases in Wuhan alone until 18 January (up to 9,700) – officially there were only 444 until that date. If cases actually occur 100 times more often than the official figures, the virus can do a lot. less dangerous than is now thought, but also much more dispersed.

Experts say it is likely that only the most seriously ill patients seek help and are therefore registered – the vast majority will only have mild, cold-like symptoms. For those whose conditions get worse, there is a risk of pneumonia that can destroy the lungs and kill you.

Can the virus be cured?

The COVID-19 virus cannot currently be cured and it is difficult to contain.

Antibiotics do not work against viruses, so they are excluded. Antiviral drugs can work, but the process of understanding a virus and then developing and producing drugs to treat it would take years and huge amounts of money.

There is no vaccine for the coronavirus yet and it is unlikely that a vaccine will be developed in time that could be useful in this outbreak for similar reasons as above.

The National Institutes of Health in the US and Baylor University in Waco, Texas, say they are working on a vaccine based on what they know about coronaviruses in general, using information from the SARS outbreak. But this can take a year or more to develop, according to Pharmaceutical technology.

Currently, governments and health authorities are working to control the virus and care for patients who are sick and prevent them from infecting other people.

People who contract the disease are quarantined in hospitals, where their symptoms can be treated and they are away from the uninfected public.

And airports around the world are implementing screening measures, such as having doctors on site, measuring people’s temperature to monitor fever, and using thermal screening to detect those who may be sick (infection causes an elevated temperature).

However, it can take weeks for the symptoms to appear, so there is only a small chance that patients will be noticed at an airport.

Is this outbreak an epidemic or a pandemic?

The outbreak is an epidemic when a disease occurs in a community, such as a country or region.

Although it has spread to dozens of countries, the outbreak has not yet been classified as a pandemic, which is defined by the World Health Organization as the “global spread of a new disease.”

Dr. Sylvie Briand, head of global contagious preparation for contagious dangers, said: “We are not currently in a pandemic. We are in the phase where it is an epidemic with multiple foci, and we are trying to put an end to the transfer in each of these foci, “the Guardian reported.

She said that most of the cases outside of Hubei were “flooded” from the epicenter, so the disease did not spread actively around the world.

.

Comments
Loading...