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Coronavirus kills its victims for up to 13 years before they are said to have died naturally, research shows

Coronavirus kills people over a decade before they are said to have died naturally, according to a study.

Men who die of COVID-19 lose an average of 13 years of their lives, scientists say, while women have cut their life expectancy by 11 years.

The disease, which has hospitalized more than 100,000 people in the UK, has a devastating impact similar to heart disease, the scientists said.

The study was conducted by Public Health Scotland and experts from the universities of Glasgow and Edinburgh.

It goes against the authorities’ focus on the ‘underlying health problems’ of most people who die from COVID-19.

And it goes against the claims that many of the victims are people who probably died anyway.

Data from the Office for National Statistics shows that most people who die in the UK are between 75 and 84 years old.

The Scottish study states that many of those people could have expected more life for years or even more than a decade had they not contracted the virus.

Even people with long-term illnesses – known as morbidities – are cut by many years, they said.

Males lose an average of 13 years of life to the coronavirus, while females lose 11. The number of years lost is usually higher the younger a person dies

Males lose an average of 13 years of life to the coronavirus, while females lose 11. The number of years lost is usually higher the younger a person dies

Even people with long-term illnesses - known as morbidities - are cut by many years, they said

Even people with long-term illnesses - known as morbidities - are cut by many years, they said

Even people with long-term illnesses – known as morbidities – are cut by many years, they said

Nearly 90% of people who die from COVID-19 are over the age of 65, reports reveals

Nearly 90 percent of people who die from coronavirus in England and Wales are over 65 years old, the report revealed today.

Separate figures compiled by the US showed 10,808 of the 12,380 COVID-19 deaths that occurred until April 10 among those over 65.

It is unclear why the total number of deaths is slightly different from the total number in the main US report.

The data also found that 23 people under the age of 29 had died after testing positive for the killer virus until April 10, compared to 334 people in their 50s.

And men made up the bulk of the COVID-19 deaths, representing 60 percent (7,524) of the total.

AGE

<1

1-4

5-9

10-14

15-19

20-24

25-29

30-34

35-39

40-44

45-49

50-54

55-59

60-64

65-69

70-74

75-79

80-84

85-89

90+

TOTAL

KILL

0

0

0

0

5

8

15

22

39

56

141

243

424

619

827

1,348

1,911

2,428

2,275

2,019

12,380

MEN

0

0

0

0

2

4

8

13

24

33

79

150

279

415

546

893

1,240

1,525

1,346

967

7,524

LADIES

0

0

0

0

3

4

7

9

15

23

62

93

145

204

281

455

671

903

929

1,052

4,856

The scientists, led by Dr. David McAllister of the University of Glasgow, wrote, “While the media coverage of the pandemic is strongly focused on COVID-19 affecting people with ‘underlying health problems’, modifying the number and type of long-term conditions is only modestly reducing the estimated life years lost due to COVID-19. ‘

Their research was based on a study of COVID-19 patients in Italy and a sliding scale prepared by the World Health Organization used to calculate how many years of life people lose from disease.

The vast majority of people – except those over the age of 100 – lose years of life to some type of condition or theoretically avoidable factor.

The Scottish researchers studied the ages of people who died of the coronavirus and found that men lost an average of 13 years and women 11 years, even taking into account their other health problems.

In England and Wales, the most common age at which people died of COVID-19, until April 17, was between 80 and 84 years of age, according to the Office for National Statistics.

The scale of WHO lost years explains that a 81-year death equals 14 years of lost life.

The life years lost for people in their fifties without underlying conditions were around 35.81 years.

By comparison, it hardly decreased for one morbidity (35.03). The figure was 29.67 for people in their fifties with two conditions – and 19.39 for people with five.

Dr. McAllister and colleagues explained that differences in the types of disease led to a “large variability” in the impact of the virus on their lives.

The study they used in their study focused on people with heart disease, irregular heartbeat, heart failure, stroke, high blood pressure, diabetes, dementia, COPD, cancer, liver failure, and kidney disease.

But their findings showed that even the most critically ill patients who then died from COVID-19 lost “significant” time they would otherwise have lived.

They said, “About most age and multimorbidity count [categories] the estimated life years lost per person remained significant and generally exceeded five years.

“This means that even after taking into account the number of multimorbidities, most individuals lost considerably more than the” 1-2 years “suggested by some commentators.”

While a majority of people who have died of coronavirus in the UK have had long-term health problems that have left them vulnerable, healthy people and young people are also dying.

There have been regular reports of previously healthy people of any age, in their twenties to over 100, dying from the virus.

And the government was criticized for trying to assure the public, in the run-up to the British epidemic, that the disease was most dangerous to the minority – the elderly and the already sick.

However, almost half of people in England say they live with a long-term health condition of some description.

The Scottish researchers, who focused on a study of coronavirus victims in Italy, found that high blood pressure was the most common disease in people who died of COVID-19 – 73 percent of all fatalities had the condition.

This was followed by diabetes (31.3 percent), heart disease (27.8 percent) and irregular heartbeat (23.7 percent).

Dr. McAllister and colleagues said, “Among patients who die from COVID-19, there appears to be a significant burden in terms of life years lost, [on par] with diseases such as coronary artery disease or pneumonia. ‘

The study is published at Wellcome Open Research without being judged by other scientists.

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