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Coronavirus deaths are TWO times higher in poor areas in England and Wales, official figures show

People living in the poorest parts of England and Wales die more than double the number of people living in affluent areas of coronavirus, shocking figures show.

A report by the Office for National Statistics found that the most disadvantaged regions suffered 55 deaths per 100,000 people, compared to 25 deaths in the wealthiest areas.

London, the heart of the British outbreak, had the highest death rate, with 85.7 deaths per 100,000 people – more than double the national average of 36.2 fatalities.

The boroughs of Newham, Brent and Hackney were the three hardest hit regions across the country, with 144, 142 and 127 deaths per 100,000, respectively.

The states in the capital accounted for all of the top ten most affected local authorities, the report found.

Hastings, in affluent East Sussex and Norwich, had the lowest COVID-19 mortality rates – with six and five deaths per 100,000, respectively.

People living in the poorest parts of England and Wales die of the coronavirus with more than double the number of people living in affluent areas, shocking figures show

People living in the poorest parts of England and Wales die of the coronavirus with more than double the number of people living in affluent areas, shocking figures show

Experts say that people living in poverty are more likely to smoke and drink alcohol, and are more likely to be obese, all of which increase the chances of chronic health problems.

Patients with pre-existing health problems struggle to fight COVID-19 before it becomes life-threatening.

And poor people also use public transport more often and live in crowded houses, which increases the chance of catching and spreading the virus.

The second most affected area behind London was the West Midlands, where the mortality rate is 43.2 per 100,000.

The report analyzed 20,283 virus deaths recorded in England and Wales from March 1 to April 17.

It also found that the death rate is six times higher among those who live in large cities than in the countryside. No rural area had a mortality rate higher than 21.9.

The report found that the mortality rate among men in the most deprived areas was higher (76.7 deaths per 100,000 inhabitants) than among women (39.6).

London, the heart of the British outbreak, had the highest death rate, with 85.7 deaths per 100,000 people - more than double the national average of 36.2 fatalities. The second most affected area was the West Midlands, where the mortality rate is 43.2 per 100,000, followed closely by the northwest (40)

London, the heart of the British outbreak, had the highest death rate, with 85.7 deaths per 100,000 people - more than double the national average of 36.2 fatalities. The second most affected area was the West Midlands, where the mortality rate is 43.2 per 100,000, followed closely by the northwest (40)

London, the heart of the British outbreak, had the highest death rate, with 85.7 deaths per 100,000 people – more than double the national average of 36.2 fatalities. The second most affected area was the West Midlands, where the mortality rate is 43.2 per 100,000, followed closely by the northwest (40)

The report analyzed 20,283 virus deaths registered in England and Wales between March 1 and April 17. It also found that the mortality rate among people in large cities is six times higher than in rural areas. No rural area had a mortality rate higher than 21.9

The report analyzed 20,283 virus deaths registered in England and Wales between March 1 and April 17. It also found that the mortality rate among people in large cities is six times higher than in rural areas. No rural area had a mortality rate higher than 21.9

The report analyzed 20,283 virus deaths registered in England and Wales between March 1 and April 17. It also found that the mortality rate among people in large cities is six times higher than in rural areas. No rural area had a mortality rate higher than 21.9

Overall mortality rates are normally higher in more disadvantaged areas, the US said, but so far COVID-19 appears to push rates even higher.

Nick Stripe, Head of Health Analysis, Office for National Statistic, said, “By mid-April, the region with the highest number of deaths involving COVID-19 was London, and the virus has been involved in more than 4 in 10 deaths since its inception March.

The region with the lowest share of COVID-19 deaths, on the other hand, was southwest, where just over 1 in 10 coronavirus deaths occurred.

The eleven local authorities with the highest mortality rates were all boroughs of London, with Newham, Brent and Hackney having the highest deaths from COVID-19 members.

People living in more disadvantaged areas have experienced a COVID-19 mortality rate that is more than double that living in less disadvantaged areas.

“Overall mortality rates are normally higher in more deprived areas, but so far COVID-19 seems to bring them even higher.”

It comes after Oxfam has warned that the corona virus pandemic could lead half a billion people worldwide to poverty.

A report by the Nairobi-based charity last month looked at the impact of the crisis on global poverty by reducing household income and consumption.

According to the report, the world would be hit much more severely than after the 2008 financial crisis.

It said, “The estimates show that, regardless of the scenario, global poverty may increase for the first time since 1990.”

The report added that this could mean that some countries are returning to the poverty level seen the last three decades ago.

The authors of the report explored a number of scenarios to assess how poverty can change.

The most serious scenario would result in a 20% pressure on incomes.

It would mean that the number of people living in extreme poverty – $ 1.90 a day or less – will increase by as much as 434 million to nearly 1.2 billion people worldwide

Women are at much greater risk than men because they are more likely to work with little or no labor rights in the informal economy.

In the same scenario, those living in higher poverty, $ 5.50 or less, would rise by 548 million to nearly four billion people.

The report warned, “Everyday life does not allow the poorest people to take time off from work or stock up.”

It added that more than two billion workers in the informal sector worldwide had no access to sickness benefits.

The World Bank said last week that poverty in East Asia and the Pacific alone could increase by 11 million if conditions deteriorate.

Oxfam has proposed a six-point action plan that would generate money and grants for people and businesses in need.

The charity also called for debt cancellation, more support from the International Monetary Fund and more aid.

Taxing wealth, extraordinary profits and speculative financial products would help raise the necessary funds, Oxfam added.

The call for debt relief has grown in recent weeks as the effects of the Covid-19 pandemic have flared developing countries around the world.

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