Coronavirus Australia: Peter Switzer gives six ‘sensible suggestions’ to end lockdowns forever

Pictured: business expert Peter Switzer

While millions of Australians remain under strict stay-at-home orders, a financial entrepreneur and commentator has made six ‘sensible’ suggestions to end lockdowns forever.

On Tuesday, Victoria extended their lockdown, South Australia joined them by announcing their own lockdown, and in NSW authorities have hinted that restrictions will remain in place for weeks longer.

Peter Switzer, a well-known broadcaster and author, said business groups had lost patience with state prime ministers and their constant calls for quick shutdowns.

He said agencies such as the Australian Industry Group believe state leaders and politicians are taking the lockdown too far to keep their jobs.

As millions of Australians remain under strict stay-at-home orders this week, a business executive has made six 'sensible' suggestions to end lockdowns forever

As millions of Australians remain under strict stay-at-home orders this week, a business executive has made six ‘sensible’ suggestions to end lockdowns forever

Mr. Switzer added that tough federal government measures forced companies into bankruptcy, causing workers to lose their jobs and “contaminating the economy.”

PETER SWITZER’S LOCKDOWN 3.0

1. Everything opens up and you wear a mask every time you are outside the house and car.

2. There is strict control on social distancing.

3. Fines for violating the rules will be increased to $2,000. If you get caught again, the fine doubles every time!

4. Prime Ministers read the riot law and tell everyone that if you are selfish or do stupid things, we will punish you.

5. No foreigners will enter the country unless they are vaccinated.

6. And only people with medical conditions can refuse to be vaccinated.

The manager offered six ‘sensible’ solutions to end ‘this lockdown madness’, calling for a ‘Lockdown 3.0’ with an aggressive approach to restrictions.

First, Mr Switzer said “everything” should open up, with people being required to wear a mask every time they are out of the house or in the car.

Second, social distancing would be “heavily monitored.” Third, fines for breaking the rules would be increased to $2,000 and doubled each time the same person makes a mistake.

Fourth, state prime ministers “read the riot law and tell everyone that if you are selfish or do foolish things, we will punish you.”

Fifth, foreigners are not allowed to enter the country unless they are fully vaccinated, and ultimately only people with medical conditions could refuse the shot.

“Not only does this virus infect bodies, it infects an economy and our way of life, with the shocking effect of a rise in suicides,” he wrote.

“If too many people act like immature brats, then our leaders should be like grown parents.”

The financial commentator said he would personally welcome a “tougher, nastier Australia” until enough vaccines arrive in the country.

A well-known financial commentator says he would personally welcome a 'tougher, nastier Australia' until enough vaccines arrive in the country (pictured, a pedestrian on George Street in Sydney's CBD)

A well-known financial commentator says he would personally welcome a ‘tougher, nastier Australia’ until enough vaccines arrive in the country (pictured, a pedestrian on George Street in Sydney’s CBD)

NSW had 110 cases overnight with 43 contagious in the community, and 13 of the infections have yet to be linked to known cases (pictured, NSW health officials are stopping passengers arriving from Melbourne)

NSW had 110 cases overnight with 43 contagious in the community, and 13 of the infections have yet to be linked to known cases (pictured, NSW health officials are stopping passengers arriving from Melbourne)

While Australia has an abundant supply of AstraZeneca, as of July 19, only 14.1 percent of Australians over 16 had been fully vaccinated against Covid, despite the Indian Delta strain being more contagious, health ministry data shows.

Just over a third or 35.7 per cent of Australians have received one dose, well below the 80 per cent herd immunity level or the 70 per cent figure that Scott Morrison is calling for to prevent more lockdowns.

An Essential Media survey found that 41 percent of those who delayed their first vaccination were waiting for more Pfizer doses to be available from September.

The poll found that of those 600 people who delayed their vaccine, 41 percent were waiting for Pfizer, and nearly half, or 47 percent, in the 18 to 34 age group were also waiting for that particular vaccine.

Meanwhile, 29 percent wanted to see how other people would react to the jab.

Ms Berejiklian refused to rule out the introduction of even stricter restrictions in Greater Sydney as the highly contagious Delta strain continues to spread through the city (pictured, an office worker walks on a deserted food plaza in Sydney's CBD)

Ms Berejiklian refused to rule out the introduction of even stricter restrictions in Greater Sydney as the highly contagious Delta strain continues to spread through the city (pictured, an office worker walks on a deserted food plaza in Sydney’s CBD)

On Wednesday, NSW Prime Minister Gladys Berejiklian said the lockdown is unlikely to end on July 30 until the number of infectious people in the community was “zero or close to zero.”

The state had 110 cases overnight, 43 of which were contagious in the community, and 13 of the infections have yet to be linked to known cases.

There are now 106 patients in NSW hospitals suffering from Covid-19. Twenty-three are in intensive care (four less than Tuesday) and 11 of them (same as Tuesday) need a ventilator.

NSW recorded its highest rate of testing to date from midnight to 8pm on Tuesday night at 83,477 tests.

South Australia has registered six new cases of Covid-19 as the nationwide lockdown continues (pictured, a test clinic in Adelaide's Victoria Park on Tuesday)

South Australia has registered six new cases of Covid-19 as the nationwide lockdown continues (pictured, a test clinic in Adelaide’s Victoria Park on Tuesday)

Ms Berejiklian declined to rule out even stricter restrictions being introduced in Greater Sydney if the highly contagious Delta strain continues to spread through the city.

She said it would be impossible to plan a way out of the lockdown until the number of cases started to fall and admitted that if there is no consistent drop by the weekend she would have to put in place even tougher restrictions.

Victoria announced earlier on Wednesday that the state had detected a further 22 local cases of Covid-19 as the state enters the first day of an extended seven-day lockdown to contain the spread of the latest Covid outbreak.

The state’s health ministry said the new community cases — detected from 59,355 tests conducted Tuesday — are all linked to known outbreaks.

Wednesday’s 22 new locally-acquired cases are the highest daily increase in Victoria since September amid the deadly second wave of Covid-19 infections in the state.

SYDNEY’S LOCKDOWN: WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW UNTIL JULY 30

Those living in Greater Sydney, the Blue Mountains, Central Coast, Shellharbour and Wollongong must adhere to the following:

Masks are mandatory in all indoor outdoor environments, including offices and apartment buildings

Residents can travel only 10 km from their home

– Practice and gather outdoors in groups of two

– Only one member of each household per day is allowed to leave the house for essential errands

– No browsing in supermarkets and shops. Shop for essential items only

– Funerals are limited to 10, weddings are prohibited

– No carpooling with other households when exercising

There is no curfew but there is a stay-at-home order, with just four reasons to leave your home

Schools are closed with homeschooling, but no child will be turned away if they have to attend in person

The new rules are in addition to the stay-at-home rules already in effect until July 30, including only leaving the house to:

*shop for essential items (one person only)

*give care and compassionate reasons (one visitor only)

*exercise or for work or training that cannot be performed remotely

People in Fairfield, Liverpool or Canterbury in south-west Sydney are advised to stay at home unless:

*shop for essential items (one person only)

*give care and compassionate reasons (one visitor only)

*For work, unless it is an essential service, such as health workers. Companies must offer employees the opportunity to work from home.

* All essential workers who are allowed to leave their suburbs to work are subject to the same restrictions that were previously in place, namely receiving a negative Covid test every three days.

The rest of NSW (including regional areas) is subject to the following restrictions:

  • Dance and gym classes are limited to 20 people per class and masks must be worn
  • No more than five visitors (including children) in homes
  • Masks are mandatory in all non-residential indoor environments
  • The four-square-foot rule is back for indoor and outdoor environments and drinking while standing in indoor venues is not allowed
  • Dancing is not allowed in indoor hangouts or nightclubs, but dancing is allowed at weddings before the wedding party (no more than 20 people)

When will the lockdown end?

  • Stay at home orders are valid for Greater Sydney including the Blue Mountains, Central Coast, Wollongong and Shellharbour until 11:59pm on Friday 30th July 2021

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