Coronavirus Australia: Illegal gathering in Sydney leads to latest Covid death of woman in her 80s

Sydney’s latest coronavirus victim, a woman in her 80s, was found dead in the same western Sydney house where an illegal gathering spread Covid to 28 people last weekend.

The gathering was investigated by police after more than half of the 50 in attendance contracted the virus, with a large family group said to have gathered to mourn a relative.

By a cruel twist of fate, it appears that the same meeting in Pendle Hill has resulted in the death of another relative.

She was one of two people to die from the coronavirus on Monday, bringing the total death toll in NSW from the recent outbreak, which began on June 16, while a further 18 people are fighting for their lives on ventilators.

NSW Health confirmed the other victim was a man, also in his 80s, who was pronounced dead at Campbelltown Hospital.

It comes after stern warnings from health officials not to “mix” with family members outside your household as the highly contagious Indian Delta species continues to increase across the Harbor City.

The photo shows emergency services arriving at the scene in Pendle Hill where a woman in her 80s died of Covid at the same house where an illegal family gathering was held last weekend.

Police are parked outside Pendle Hill home in Sydney, where a woman in her 80s died of Covid-19 - the same home where 28 people contracted the virus last weekend

Police are parked outside Pendle Hill home in Sydney, where a woman in her 80s died of Covid-19 – the same home where 28 people contracted the virus last weekend

Police and emergency services were photographed outside the Pendle Hill home, where the woman’s body was found Monday afternoon.

It’s the same address where a week earlier, on July 19, a large group of grieving relatives gathered to mourn the death of another relative, who was not Covid-related.

In the meantime, 28 people who were in the house have returned a positive test for the Indian Delta variant.

Police blocked the road Monday night as devastated relatives sat outside in the front yard.

It is the second time a person has died after contracting the virus from family, after Saeeda Akobi Jjou Stu, who lived in Green Valley, died three days after testing positive (photo, Covid test in Fairfield)

It is the second time a person has died after contracting the virus from family, after Saeeda Akobi Jjou Stu, who lived in Green Valley, died three days after testing positive (photo, Covid test in Fairfield)

Neighbors said they saw a large number of cars pulled up on their street that day in violation of Sydney’s strict lockdown laws, but did not report the household to police as they knew a loved one had died.

“We saw the police here for the first time and the body was taken away,” a neighbor told the police Daily Telegram.

“A lot of people came in and out, three or four at a time, but I didn’t want to say anything because they had just lost someone. It’s very sad.’

It is the second time a person has died after contracting the virus from family, after Saeeda Akobi Jjou Stu, who lived in Green Valley, died three days after testing positive.

Her twin sons, infected movers Roni and Ramsin Shawka, and her husband also have the virus.

Health Minister Brad Hazzard sent an ominous warning to families in western Sydney on Saturday, urging them to follow Sydney’s strict stay-at-home measures.

A man in his 80s also died of Covid at Campbelltown Hospital on Monday (pictured)

A man in his 80s also died of Covid at Campbelltown Hospital on Monday (pictured)

“We really need our community, especially in the South West and West of Sydney, to stay home, hear the message and stay home,” he said.

‘And don’t mix with relatives from other households.

“It will continue to cause tremendous grief here in Sydney, especially in Sydney’s west and south-west, when family members mingle with family members from other households.

“Please, stop it. Stop.’

NSW Deputy Chief Health Officer Dr. Jeremy McAnulty noted that he was particularly “concerned” by the Pendle Hill meeting.

“Families coming together, even in tragic times, when you naturally grieve, can be a risk where Covid can easily penetrate and spread among family members and then to their households and further afield,” he said.

Adriana Midori Takara, 38 (pictured), tested positive for the highly contagious strain of the Indian Delta on July 15 and succumbed to her illness less than two weeks later.

Adriana Midori Takara, 38 (pictured), tested positive for the highly contagious strain of the Indian Delta on July 15 and succumbed to her illness less than two weeks later.

The news comes after the death on Sunday of Adriana Midori Takara, a 38-year-old Brazilian student who lived in the Sydney CBD and was in her final year of a master’s degree in accounting.

A second woman, in her 70s, also died of Covid that same day.

Sydney recorded 145 new cases of Covid-19 overnight, with 51 people living in the community while contagious.

Prime Minister Gladys Berejiklian told a news conference Monday morning that the source of the infection for 79 of the new cases is still under investigation.

Fifty-five of the cases were linked to domestic contacts of known cases, and nine were other close contacts.

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Chief Health Officer Dr. Kerry Chant said the number of unvaccinated people over 60 is “worrying” and urged anyone in the age bracket to make an appointment immediately.

It’s not yet known if the two latest deaths were shot or if they had underlying medical conditions.

“When I look at the numbers, to see how little even 60-year-olds and over 70-year-olds we’ve managed to reach,” said Dr Chant.

“To me, anyone over the age of 60 or over 70 should see their doctor urgently, or their pharmacist, who will open statewide in the next few days and get a dose of vaccine.”

Sydney recorded 145 new Covid-19 cases overnight, with 51 people living in the community while contagious (picture shows locals from Bondi Beach walking along the water on Monday)

Sydney recorded 145 new Covid-19 cases overnight, with 51 people living in the community while contagious (picture shows locals from Bondi Beach walking along the water on Monday)

dr. Chant speculated that NSW could administer more than 350,000 vaccines a day if there were no problems with supplies, but that the state would have to make do with the current shortage of Pfizer.

“There are priority groups, some of which fall under the responsibility of the Commonwealth, such as disability and aged care that we want to make sure they are absolutely vaccinated,” she said.

She also said the jab will be available on a walk-in basis in some health clinics in an effort to target vulnerable groups, in a policy shift to be announced Tuesday.

It’s unclear if people under 40 can get AstraZeneca without an appointment.

Ms Berejiklian said she “pled my little heart” for more Pfizer shots during the national cabinet on Friday, but health authorities would focus on distributing the shots – ensuring they are given to young workers, where Dr. Chant agreed.

Pictured: A graph showing the number of infections per day in the current Sydney outbreak, which grew by 145 cases on Monday

Pictured: A graph showing the number of infections per day in the current Sydney outbreak, which grew by 145 cases on Monday

‘It is logical. The only people who actually move are those essential workers,” the health official said.

‘People working in logistics and distribution, critical workers who come from the area supporting Sydney and even NSW and beyond.

‘It is important that we think about how vaccination of that group could possibly prevent transmission.’

Ms Berejiklian did not specify whether Greater Sydney would come out of lockdown after July 30, but her government has requested financial models that would assess the devastating effect of the extension of restrictions to September 17.

“Be assured that our mission is to keep the community as safe as possible, while allowing people to live as freely as possible,” she said.

“Over the next few days, we will continue to look at existing institutions to give people certainty about what life will be like in New South Wales after July 31st.

“It’s very important that people don’t leave the house unless they absolutely have to and especially don’t associate with each other.”

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