Coronavirus Australia: Friends pay tribute to Bondi woman, 38, who died of Covid

Heartbroken friends of a 38-year-old Brazilian master’s student who died after a two-week battle with Covid have urged other young people to get vaccinated.

Adriana Midori Takara, 38, returned a positive test for the highly contagious strain from the Indian Delta on July 15 and succumbed to her illness in hospital.

The finance officer, described by friends as the “brightest star,” died alone in intensive care after emergency surgery, in which doctors found a viral infection on her heart.

Despite being a respiratory virus, Covid-19 can affect organs throughout the body, with scientists finding damage to the patient’s heart, brain and liver.

Marlene Coimbra, a teacher who knew Mrs. Takara, said her death should serve as a warning to other young people.

Adriana Midori Takara, 38 (pictured), tested positive for the highly contagious strain of the Indian Delta on July 15 and succumbed to her illness less than two weeks later.

“We need to tell young people to get vaccinated, to take care of their bodies,” she said The Daily Telegraph.

Friends claimed that Ms. Takara contracted the virus from her roommate who works as a nurse, and despite her attempts to get an AstraZeneca vaccine, her doctor refused.

She had no underlying health problems that would have contributed to her death and her distraught family at home had to say goodbye via Zoom.

But the tearful conversation was a one-way street, with Ms Takara never regaining consciousness after her emergency surgery.

Prime Minister Gladys Berejiklian said the young woman’s death should serve as a clear warning to those complacent about the virus that it does not discriminate.

Madam Takara lived with her boyfriend in Sydney’s CBD and was about to complete her accounting degree from Kaplan Business School.

One of their roommates was a nurse who recently tested positive for Covid, a friend claimed on Facebook, and sent the unvaccinated couple who would later test positive into isolation.

Just a few days later, her boyfriend called an ambulance and… Madam Takara was rushed to the Royal Prince Alfred Hospital and felt very ‘unwell’.

Ms Takara (pictured) had no underlying health problems

Ms Takara moved to Sydney in 2019

Ms Takara (pictured) had no underlying health conditions that would have contributed to her death

“A day or two after admission, Adriana complained of chest pain. Medical personnel have determined that she has a heart attack,” her friend Jules Pedrosa wrote on Facebook.

“She needed surgery immediately and an instrument (don’t know if it was a pacemaker or something else) was supposed to help her heart keep a regular rhythm.

Adriana’s health deteriorated after a few days and further tests confirmed that her heart had a ‘viral infection’.

“This is interesting because she and her family have no history of heart disease.”

He said her condition deteriorated so rapidly that with the appropriate consent of relatives, it was decided to shut down the life-saving machines.

Under Sydney’s strict lockdown rules, no friends or family were allowed to visit Ms Takara in intensive care, forcing loved ones to say goodbye via video link.

Ms Takara lived with her boyfriend in Sydney's CBD and was about to complete her accounting degree at Kaplan Business School (pictured)

Ms Takara lived with her boyfriend in Sydney’s CBD and was about to complete her accounting degree at Kaplan Business School (pictured)

The young student is said to have lived in Bondi (photo, locals in the area on Sunday)

The young student is said to have lived in Bondi (photo, locals in the area on Sunday)

“It's shocking… she was healthy, happy, working, she had a boyfriend.  It's shocking,

“It’s shocking… she was healthy, happy, working, she had a boyfriend. It’s shocking,” said Marlene Coimbra (pictured)

“All farewells were taken from the audience in Australia and Brazil via Zoom,” said Pedrosa.

“Communication was a one-way street because she had been unconscious for several hours after her emergency heart surgery.”

Ms. Coimbra, a student liaison officer who quickly became close friends with the finance officer, added that she was weakened “very, very quickly.”

‘She was very young, someone with a future full of plans and dreams. It’s so sad,” she added.

Ms Takara moved from São Paulo to Australia in 2019 and quickly became part of the ‘family’ in Sydney’s tight-knit expat community of South Americans.

Gladys Berejiklian (pictured on Sunday) revealed that the young woman was one of two people who died from the virus on Saturday

Gladys Berejiklian (pictured on Sunday) revealed that the young woman was one of two people who died from the virus on Saturday

One of her friends shared a heartfelt message on Facebook to remind Australians that she’s not just another coronavirus stat.

“Adriana is not a number, she is a woman with dreams and wishes,” Fernanda Ferreira Batista wrote on Sunday.

‘Adriana is a daughter, sister, aunt, niece and above all a friend. A great friend, not only my friend, but friend of so many people,’

Tonight when you look at the sky it will be brighter and the shining star will be my friend, peace is away from all this madness.

“I can’t thank all the doctors enough for their best.”

Although the number of cases fell on Sunday, officials are still concerned about the number of people in the community who are contagious

Although the number of cases fell on Sunday, officials are still concerned about the number of people in the community who are contagious

NSW reported 141 new locally acquired Covid cases on Sunday, bringing the total number of infections since the outbreak started last month to 2081.

But madam Takara’s shocking death was not the only coronavirus fatality reported this weekend.

A second woman, in her 70s from southwestern Sydney, also died.

“Keep in mind that younger people without pre-existing conditions can also fall victim to this cruel disease,” Ms Berejiklian said.

“This is a horribly cruel disease, which is why our response is so strong against it.”

The prime minister warned that 38 of these newly registered cases were contagious in the community during Sunday morning’s press conference.

There are 141 patients with Covid in hospitals in Sydney. Of these, 43 are in intensive care, 42 of which are unvaccinated. One just got their first shot.

One patient in the hospital is in their teens, while seven are in their twenties and three are in their thirties. There are 32 patients in the hospital between the ages of 50 and 79.

Sydney is now entering its fifth week of lockdown since the new outbreak began (pictured, the eerily quiet city on Sunday)

Sydney is now entering its fifth week of lockdown since the new outbreak began (pictured, the eerily quiet city on Sunday)

The Prime Minister delivered the update along with NSW Health’s Dr Jeremy McAnulty, giving Chief Health Officer Kerry Chant a day off to be the bearer of bad news.

But although the number of cases fell on Sunday, officials are still concerned about the number of people in the community who are contagious.

There are serious concerns that Saturday’s protests will prove to be a super-spreading event, and authorities are calling on the estimated 3,500 people who attended in Sydney to get a Covid test in the interest of the community.

“I’m calling on all 3,500 people to get tested tomorrow, if not for themselves for the sake of their families and friends,” Police Secretary David Elliott said.

A total of 57 protesters were charged at the event, but detectives are working around the clock to identify those who have chosen not to wear face masks in direct violation of public health regulations.

“It broke my heart,” Ms Berejiklian said when she saw photos of all the protesters.

“Millions of people in our state are doing the right thing and it broke my heart that people had such contempt for their communities. I loathe it.’

“Thank you to the people who do the right thing and to those who don’t… you should be ashamed of yourselves.”

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