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Coronavirus Australia: Doctor has worked 28 days in a row

A hero doctor has worked continuously for 28 days to treat up to 55 patients a day, as the coronavirus crisis is putting pressure on health professionals.

Dr. Kamran Ali is a general practitioner in two Brisbane clinics in Kallangur and Kenmore and works from 9am to 5pm – or sometimes later – without a break.

Nearby clinics close because vulnerable physicians hang up their scrubs and work from home to avoid the risk of contamination.

With many practices that do not recruit new patients as GPs decline, Dr. Ali, the only physician in the Australian Physician Clinic Kallangur, is forced to work non-stop under the supervision of 50 to 55 people per day.

Dr. Kamran Ali (pictured) has worked four weeks in a row and seen up to 55 patients a day to ensure that people receive adequate medical attention amid the coronavirus pandemic

Dr. Kamran Ali (pictured) has worked four weeks in a row and seen up to 55 patients a day to ensure that people receive adequate medical attention amid the coronavirus pandemic

“Our entire system of the clinic is overloaded,” his wife Nazia told Daily Mail Australia.

‘There are many doctors with chronic conditions who are pregnant or have children under one at home. The doctors are under a lot of stress.

“Doctors are just as scared as everyone else, they are at risk. They are on the front line.

“It’s a tough time.”

Dr. Ali is one of many physicians working tirelessly across the country as the number of patients increases and healthcare becomes increasingly overloaded.

Last week, he conducted patient consultations in the parking lot so that others in the waiting room were not considered at risk.

Due to a shortage of supplies, doctors no longer have personal protective equipment, including masks.

Ms Ali said she is concerned about doctors contracting the disease because they currently lack adequate protection.

Her husband is currently using face masks donated by a local medical student.

Dr. Ali took a photo with his wife Nazia and sons, Rayyan, ten, and Moiz, eight, in Legoland

Dr. Ali took a photo with his wife Nazia and sons, Rayyan, ten, and Moiz, eight, in Legoland

Dr. Ali took a photo with his wife Nazia and sons, Rayyan, ten, and Moiz, eight, in Legoland

In response to the shortage, Health Minister Greg Hunt announced on Tuesday that critical health supplies have been ordered and that 54 million masks are expected to be in the country by the end of April.

The mother of two said that while all doctors are doing their best and the government is doing everything possible to support them, the crisis is putting increasing pressure on healthcare.

The strong influx of patients has also forced doctors to become selective with whom they treat.

Ms. Ali said that with such a high volume, critical cases are the top priority, meaning that some people are delayed in receiving medical attention.

Earlier this week, the government announced that Telehealth, a digital consultation platform, is being expanded to allow vulnerable physicians to work from home.

While the alternative is safer, some conditions and illness require personal diagnosis or treatment, such as cuts and stitches.

Ms. Ali said that while the system is great for helping physicians, those who have an underlying condition or are older than 60-70 years choose to use the service, which adds to the pressure on clinic workers.

She said her husband told her “the moment I cannot take a break, these patients have nowhere to go, the clinics in the area do not accept these patients.”

An image of Dr. Ali (photo) went viral earlier this week when his wife shared details of her husband's intensive work schedule

An image of Dr. Ali (photo) went viral earlier this week when his wife shared details of her husband's intensive work schedule

An image of Dr. Ali (photo) went viral earlier this week when his wife shared details of her husband’s intensive work schedule

Ms. Ali said that despite being exhausted at night, her husband is passionate about his job and is driven by helping others.

On Sunday, she shared a photo of her husband in his scrubs with a Facebook group committed to acts of kindness during the coronavirus pandemic.

The post praising her husband and other doctors for their dedicated work has since gone viral, with over 51,000 likes and nearly 6,000 responses.

The comment section was flooded with thousands of statements of support for Dr. Ali, who thanked him for his vital service.

Despite the harrowing circumstances of the pandemic, Ms. Ali said it has been uplifting to see how people respond to the hardships with kindness to others.

“Everyone comes out with love and support. I’ve seen people do great things for others: pay people’s rent and do their shopping. It is awesome.

“You see these kind acts going around and it motivates you to do more.”

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