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Coronavirus ABC’s Coronacast answers the most frequently asked questions children have about coronavirus

As the coronavirus pandemic floods the world, parents are confronted with complex questions from their curious children and don’t know how to answer them.

What does the corona virus look like? Why can’t we hug? Are we all dying? These are just some of the questions that run through the minds of anxious and anxious children who don’t quite understand what’s going on around them.

So to help parents answer these questions, ABC’s Coronacast guest doctor Norman Swan and health reporter Tegan Taylor have answered the most frequently asked questions about COVID-19 in simple terms.

As the coronavirus pandemic floods the world, parents face complex questions from their curious children (stock image)

As the coronavirus pandemic floods the world, parents face complex questions from their curious children (stock image)

Microscope images reveal the spikes on the outer edge of the virus particles, which give corona viruses their name - crown-like 'corona'

Microscope images reveal the spikes on the outer edge of the virus particles, which give corona viruses their name - crown-like 'corona'

Microscope images reveal the spikes on the outer edge of the virus particles, which give corona viruses their name – crown-like ‘corona’

What does the corona virus look like?

Microscope images have revealed exactly what coronavirus looks like under a lens.

The spikes on the outer edge of the virus particles give corona viruses their name – crown-like ‘corona’.

“The coronavirus is so small you can’t see it without a special microscope, but if you look at it through that microscope, it’s like a spikey ball,” said Taylor.

The first scientist to look at this virus thought it resembled the outermost layer of the sun called the corona. In other words, Corona means “crown”. ‘

Dr. Norman Swan (photo) addressed the most frequently asked questions about COVID-19 in simple terms

Dr. Norman Swan (photo) addressed the most frequently asked questions about COVID-19 in simple terms

Dr. Norman Swan (photo) addressed the most frequently asked questions about COVID-19 in simple terms

How are people tested for coronavirus?

According to the Department of Health, if you’re sick with a respiratory infection such as a cough, runny nose, sore throat, or fever, the doctor may order a smear in the back of your nose or throat for testing.

“They did a smear in your nose that goes all the way down to the back of your throat. They turn it around a bit to catch secretions and test those secretions, ”said Dr. Swan.

“They don’t actually look for the virus itself, they actually look for the genes – the genetic code on the virus, they multiply it, and when they find the genetic code for the virus, they say you’re infected. ‘

Why can’t we hug?

Under strict new coronavirus rules, Prime Minister Scott Morrison announced strict restrictions on gatherings of no more than two people on Sunday – while urging Australians, especially those over 70, to stay at home.

The federal government has maintained social distance measures to minimize the risk of the virus spreading.

“Everyone is doing their best to stop the spread of germs so that a few people get as sick as possible. We know that one of the ways this virus spreads is by touching people who have it, ”Ms. Taylor explained.

“Sometimes people are sick and they don’t know it yet. If you live in the same house as someone and they are not sick, it’s okay to have hugs with them, but if you don’t live in the same house as someone, we’ll take a break from hugging them right now.

“The good news is that this will not last forever. Scientists are working very hard to find a way to protect people from coronavirus and once they do, we can hug our friends again. ‘

The federal government has taken social distance measures to minimize the risk of spreading the coronavirus (photo of travelers arriving in Sydney on Sunday if placed in mandatory quarantine)

The federal government has taken social distance measures to minimize the risk of spreading the coronavirus (photo of travelers arriving in Sydney on Sunday if placed in mandatory quarantine)

The federal government has taken social distance measures to minimize the risk of spreading the coronavirus (photo of travelers arriving in Sydney on Sunday if quarantined)

Talk to children about coronavirus

Australian parenting expert Sharon Witt has shared simple tricks for communicating with children about coronavirus.

She also urges parents to never talk about “death” related to the virus, to encourage hand-washing routines, and to limit children’s exposure to the news.

While there are serious side effects of COVID-19, Sharon said that generalizing is the best way to communicate these facts.

“Never say you will die from this virus; Never say it’s deadly or deadly because realistically, any disease is deadly – even chicken pox, ”Sharon previously told FEMAIL, as troubling comments can put an unnecessary burden on a child.

“All you have to do is remind them not to worry and to wash our hands more often.”

Describing the virus as a “bad bug that can make you sick” is a common way to describe it to a young child.

Reading news headlines, hearing bulletins, and reading reports can increase anxiety in children and adults, but limiting them can significantly reduce and manage stress levels.

“With all these heightened news stories and headlines, it’s a good idea to limit what children watch or listen to,” she said.

“Younger children may not be watching television directly, but they are always listening and there is a chance they may see or hear something alarming.”

When does the coronavirus end?

Since millions of people are insecure amid the ever-evolving coronavirus, it is unclear when the pandemic will end.

But Ms. Taylor assured that pediatricians and scientists are working extremely hard to develop a vaccine for the new coronavirus.

“It looks like the coronavirus will be a germ that’s just in the world people are catching from now on, kind of like the common cold and flu, but it won’t be as dangerous as it is now forever,” she said.

“Ultimately, you can get a needle like you do with some diseases, to make sure you don’t get it. Doctors and scientists are also looking for drugs that don’t make the disease as bad as you get it.

“But one of the reasons we’re staying at home for the time being is because they don’t have those drugs yet. So we must prevent people from getting it as much as possible until those drugs are ready.

She said the treatment could take months or even a year to develop.

Are we all dying?

“I think a lot of kids think things like that. The answer is no, not everyone dies, “said Dr. Swan.

“You are all young and your parents are certainly young and in a young family … no one dies. It is very unusual to get seriously ill.

“People get a mild illness, a cough and a cold, a little fatigue, you may lose the sense of taste – that’s the kind of thing you get, and then it will go away. The risk is that you pass it on to other people. ‘

The World Health Organization said that while they are still learning how COVID-19 is most at risk for people, the elderly, and those with pre-existing health problems.

Dr. Swan explained to children that if 100 people get COVID-19, 80 percent of those people “will not have serious problems at all.”

“Twenty out of a hundred people may end up in the hospital. Of those 20, maybe five will go to intensive care, and perhaps half of them will need major treatment.

“The percentage of people who die is very small, and in Australia it is very small because we are very good at this. So hopefully not many people will die in Australia and certainly not everyone will die. ‘

For a young family, Dr. Swan said that “someone can get a little sick, but it is very unusual to get seriously ill” for a child or their parents.

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