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Conversations with Friends and Normal People leads look JUST like Sally Rooney

The BBC’s latest drama, Conversations with Friends, has been widely hailed as a flop, with critics saying it failed to recapture the magic of Sally Rooney’s first adaptation, Normal People.

Many have also noted that it is very similar to Normal People, though perhaps duller, with a svelte brunette female lead from rural Ireland, characters who lose their virginity and go on a trip abroad, complicated relationships with red-haired single mothers, and the female lead who studies English at a Trinity College, Dublin.

And while the leads, Daisy Edgar Jones in Normal People and Alison Oliver in Conversations with Friends, could easily be mistaken for sisters, they also bear an uncanny resemblance to Sally Rooney.

All three women are pale brunettes with shoulder-length hair and bangs, sporting similar features.

Sally Rooney looks like her protagonists

Daisy Edgar Jones in Normal People

Daisy Edgar Jones (right) in Normal People and Alison Oliver in Conversations with Friends: They could easily be mistaken for sisters, they also bear an uncanny resemblance to Sally Rooney (left)

All three women are pale brunettes with shoulder-length hair and bangs, sporting similar features.  Rooney is in the photo

Alison Oliver in Conversations with Friends

All three women are pale brunettes with shoulder-length hair and bangs, sporting similar features. Rooney is shown on the left and Alison on the right.

In both books, Frances, the protagonist of Conversations with Friends, and Marianne, the protagonist of Normal People, are slim, dark, attractive women.

Meanwhile, they are also shy and introverted, as well as intellectually gifted, much like Sally, who became one of the youngest winners of the Costa Award.

In Normal People, Marianne is portrayed as a talented and intelligent student, who might one day become a writer.

In Conversations with Friends, Frances is a spoken word poet who performs alongside her friend Bobbi; Similarly, Sally was a keen debater while she was in college and won the European Debating Championships.

In Conversations with Friends, the characters also leave Dublin for a group vacation in Europe, this time traveling to Croatia.

In Conversations with Friends, the characters also leave Dublin for a group vacation in Europe, this time traveling to Croatia.

In Normal People, the characters go to Italy, for several episodes in which friends, including Connell, head to Marianne's house in Trieste.

In Normal People, the characters go to Italy, for several episodes in which friends, including Connell, head to Marianne’s house in Trieste.

In both series, the characters are depicted as studying English at Trinity College Dublin, which is where Rooney majored in English and American literature.

Despite the similarities to their main characters, Rooney has insisted that the books are not autobiographical and that he finds it “funny” when people do it.

Talking with him irish times in 2017, she said she’d been asked ‘lots and lots’ about reflections of her own life in her story, including being asked by a radio host at 9 a.m. if she’d ever had an affair with a married man. .

“I come to talk about my book and they ask me about my sex life. It’s so, so strange. So definitely on that level. But I made the mistake, in my opinion, of responding by saying “No”, when what I should have said was “It’s really none of your business” she explained.

Normal People tells the story of Marianne Sheridan (played by Daisy Edgar-Jones, right), a loner who has never kissed a boy.  The action begins in 2011 when she falls in love with Connell Waldron (Paul Mescal, left)

Normal People tells the story of Marianne Sheridan (played by Daisy Edgar-Jones, right), a loner who has never kissed a boy. The action begins in 2011 when she falls in love with Connell Waldron (Paul Mescal, left)

Intense: Daisy Edgar-Jones (L) and Paul Mescal (R) in the series, in which their characters fall in love in Sixth Form

Intense: Daisy Edgar-Jones (L) and Paul Mescal (R) in the series, in which their characters fall in love in Sixth Form

However, he admits that parts of his life inspire his writing.

‘Nothing is completely fictitious.

Frances moves in all the same social circles that I moved in. She gets the same bachelor’s degree I did from Trinity, so she has somewhat of the same cultural standing as I did, and it would be very dishonest of me to pretend she didn’t. inform the way I went about writing the book’

Much of her Sally writing style also comes from writing emails, something her characters do, and both Frances in Conversations with Friends and Connell in Normal People have stories accepted by literary magazines while they’re in school, as does Rooney herself.

In both series, the characters are depicted as studying English at Trinity College Dublin, which is where Rooney got his degree in English and American Literature (Pictured: Marianne in Normal People at university)

In both series, the characters are depicted as studying English at Trinity College Dublin, which is where Rooney got his degree in English and American Literature (Pictured: Marianne in Normal People at university)

In addition to the lead roles of Frances and Marianne, both Normal People and Conversations with Friends feature a cast of other 20-somethings with above-average intellectual talents (pictured, Frances's love interest and best friend Bobbi is a spoken word poet)

In addition to the lead roles of Frances and Marianne, both Normal People and Conversations with Friends feature a cast of other 20-somethings with above-average intellectual talents (Pictured, Connell writes short stories)

In addition to the lead roles of Frances and Marianne, both Normal People and Conversations with Friends feature a cast of other 20-somethings with above-average intellectual talents (on the left, Frances’s love interest and best friend, Bobbi, is a spoken word poet, while, on the right, Connell writes short stories)

Normal People is also set during the lean years when Sally herself was in college.

“It would have been really difficult for me to write about young people leaving their home in the west of Ireland, moving to university and not confronting the economic disparities that were emerging at the time, such as the removal of protections for working people- class background going to college,’ he told the guardian.

The writer was born and raised in Castlebar, a town of about 10,000 inhabitants, where she still lives.

In Normal People, this is fictionalized as Carricklea, where protagonist Marianne can’t wait to escape, something Rooney also said she longed for in her youth.

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