Controversial plans to install a new spiral ramp to connect the Sydney Harbor Bridge cycle path were slammed

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Radical plan to create new two-story spiral ramp for cyclists crossing Sydney Harbor Bridge is considered ‘ridiculous’

  • Plans for a new bike ramp have sparked intense discussions among cyclists in Sydney
  • The ramp will connect Milsons Point to the Sydney Harbor Bridge cycle path
  • One driveway has a linear model, while the other has a two-story spiral design
  • With a new route, cyclists can avoid the 55 steps they are currently climbing

A proposal for a two-story spiral ramp to connect Sydney’s suburbs to the popular Harbor Bridge cycle path has divided riders across the city.

The New South Wales government recently unveiled two proposed bicycle ramp designs to improve access to the Sydney Harbor Bridge cycle path.

NSW Transport Minister Andrew Constance unveiled the latest concepts for the highly anticipated ramp at Milsons Point on Monday.

While one of the designs was hailed by cyclists for its linear ramp, the other – a two-story spiral ramp – has already been criticized.

The linear ramp would meander north through Bradfield Park with a gentle ramp

The bike ramp will improve access to the north end of the Sydney Harbor Bridge bike path, but the two proposed designs have sparked heated discussions

NSW Transport Minister Andrew Constance (pictured) unveiled two designs for the highly anticipated ramp on Monday

NSW Transport Minister Andrew Constance (pictured) unveiled two designs for the highly anticipated ramp on Monday

Cyclists who frequent the route know all too well the tedious process of getting off and then lifting their bike to the cycle path.

Mr Constance said the ramp would not only improve rider safety but also encourage cyclists who were “unable or unwilling” to climb the 55 steps from Bradfield Park.

The transport minister said the installation of a new ramp would nearly double the number of cyclists on the popular cycle path over a decade.

“Cyclists using the Sydney Harbor Bridge cycle path will not miss the 55 steps they currently carry up and down the north side every day,” he said.

The state government has said the linear ramp model would reduce cyclists’ contact with pedestrians entering the Milsons Point train station.

Last week, the North Sydney Council voted to ‘firmly object’ to the proposal following continued resistance from residents.

Mayor Jilly Gibson has vowed to veto both options over concerns that the driveway would take up too much open space in the waterfront suburb.

Bicycle NSW, the top body for recreational cycling in NSW, hit back at Ms. Gibson’s comments in a recent Facebook post.

“We’re not sure if North Sydney Mayor Jilly Gibson understands how exclusive the 55 Steps are to families, children, the elderly or people with disabilities,” the post said.

“We encourage riders to write to her and share what a safe, rideable ramp can do for how you travel.”

Riders responded to the comments to share their frustration with the final concepts for the new driveway, with many ditching the spiral design.

‘I need some health checks here. It’s not a work of art – it takes driveways, but the two-way safe radius means this circular driveway is ridiculous, ‘someone wrote.

Cyclists who frequent the route are all too familiar with the tedious process of getting off and then carrying their bike to the popular cycle path

Cyclists who frequent the route are all too familiar with the tedious process of getting off and then carrying their bike to the popular cycle path

‘There are many cyclists who cannot physically walk up and down those stairs with their bicycle, for whom a ramp would provide a whole range of cycling options,’ commented a second.

‘I don’t understand why this has to be so difficult, can’t we just have a ramp running parallel to a bridge that ends either just before or just after the entrance to the station?’ Suggested a third.

Transport for NSW previously played with the option of an elevator or escalator, but later dropped the idea due to a lack of support from the Heritage Council of NSW.

The talks about converting a lane on the Havenbrug into a bicycle path were also rejected because of the major impact on the road network.

It is estimated that nearly 2,000 cyclists traverse the popular Sydney Harbor Bridge cycle path every day.

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