Considerably watching more than 4 hours of TV increases the mortality risk by 50%, according to the study

Hours of after-dinner binge Watching TV is worse for you than working on a desk job, according to a new study.

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Americans who watch TV for more than four hours a day have a 50 percent higher risk of developing a heart condition or die from an early death than people who watch for less than two hours, the new American Heart Association study found.

The difference between sitting at a desk and sitting on the couch is usually caused by the large meals and fatty snacks that we eat earlier or during a TV binge session, the study suspects.

To compensate for the damage & # 39; Netflix and chilling & # 39; does your heart, the scientists recommend changing the snack menu and taking an occasional break to get up and walk around.

People who spend more than four hours on binge-watching TV have a 50% higher risk of heart disease and early death because they tend to sit, not move, after eating a large meal, and often with fat , salty snacks, a new study finds (file)

People who spend more than four hours on binge-watching TV have a 50% higher risk of heart disease and early death because they tend to sit, not move, after eating a large meal, and often with fat , salty snacks, a new study finds (file)

The US has become increasingly sedentary in recent decades.

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Machines have taken over many of the types of production work that many Americans worked with physical labor, causing most of us to do intellectually but not physically trained work – office tasks.

The American Heart Association estimates that the proportion of American desk jobs has increased by 83 percent since the 1950s.

Many studies have attributed the rise in obesity, heart disease and more to the hours we spend on agencies. Some reports even go so far as to say that our office jobs are killing us & # 39; by increasing our risks of premature death.

But the advent of streaming services has provided us with a bottomless pit of content while we sit – and can replace office tasks as the new villain of the obesity epidemic.

On average, Americans over 15 watch TV for about two hours and 46 minutes, and the more we watch, the worse our hearts will be, the new study suggests.

The researchers followed a group of 3,592 African-American men and women in Jackson, Mississippi, an average 8.5 years old.

The 31 percent in the highest category for watching TV – more than four hours – had the highest risk of heart disease, heart attacks, strokes and early deaths than the lowest.

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Surprisingly, health risks are fairly evenly distributed between those who spend the most hours behind a desk and who have spent the least time at a desk.

In theory, it seems that sitting at a desk versus sitting on a couch doesn't have to make much difference – sitting.

But the authors of the study suspect that it has more to do with what you do differently during a working day than in a Netflix hole.

& # 39; Most people may tend to watch television without moving for hours, while most employees often get up from their desks & # 39 ;, said Dr. Keith Diaz, a behavioral science professor at Columbia University Vagelos College of Physicians and Surgeons.

& # 39; The combination of eating a large meal such as eating and then sitting for hours can also be particularly harmful. & # 39;

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In their study, the researchers saw that people who trained – which is more common among those in the lower TV watch brackets – could compensate for their sedentary risks.

So, it's possible that a short break from your TV time and a walk are enough to compensate for the damage to free time, & said Dr. Diaz.

Co-author Dr. Jeanette Garcia, professor of kinesiology at the University of Central Florida, underlined the importance of what we eat and when.

& # 39; At the end of the day, watching TV takes place where people can eat their biggest meal, and people can sit completely without having to sit for hours until they go to bed, "she said.

& # 39; Eating a large meal and then sitting for hours per hour can be a very harmful combination. & # 39;

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Instead, you could try not to let TV be the last thing you do in a day, or just reward yourself for a smaller, lighter dinner.

And if snacks are on the schedule with your TV time, swap heavy, greasy, greasy ones for healthier snacks such as fruit, vegetables or certain popcorn without all the salt and butter.

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