Home Travel Confused about the 100 ml rule? As plane passengers face HUGE security queues in Birmingham, we reveal what liquids rules exist where, and which airports have installed the new scanners.

Confused about the 100 ml rule? As plane passengers face HUGE security queues in Birmingham, we reveal what liquids rules exist where, and which airports have installed the new scanners.

0 comment
 Confused about the 100 ml rule? As plane passengers face HUGE security queues in Birmingham, we reveal what liquids rules exist where, and which airports have installed the new scanners.

Many UK air travelers are struggling to understand the rules on passing liquids in hand luggage through airport security as new scanners are rolled out.

Long queues have been forming at Birmingham airport, which has launched the new scanners, amid confusion over liquid restrictions.

And on Sunday, the Department for Transport temporarily reintroduced 100ml restrictions on carrying liquids in carry-on bags at six more UK regional airports with next-generation scanners.

Confused? It doesn’t surprise us. Here we explain everything to you…

Currently, all UK airports apply the 100ml liquid rule, regardless of the scanners installed.

But airports with new scanners have more flexibility in how carry-on bags pass through security.

Many UK air travelers are struggling to understand the rules on passing liquids in hand luggage through airport security as new scanners are rolled out. Currently, all UK airports apply a 100ml liquid rule, meaning liquids can be placed in hand luggage but must be divided into containers not exceeding 100ml.

Long queues have formed at Birmingham Airport (above), which has brought the new scanners into operation, amid confusion over liquid restrictions.

Long queues have formed at Birmingham Airport (above), which has brought the new scanners into operation, amid confusion over liquid restrictions.

London City, Aberdeen, Newcastle, Leeds/Bradford, south and Teesside airports, have installed new 3D CT (computed tomography) based scanners in security rooms and have removed the 100 ml rule. Thanks to its new technology, passengers could carry up to two liters of liquid in any size bottle in their carry-on luggage and not take it out at security.

However, on June 9, these airports were ordered to revert to the 100ml liquid rule despite having Next Generation Security Checkpoints (NGSC), which create a 3D image of what There is inside the passengers’ bags, which allows them to better identify the objects.

Laptops and tablets, however, can remain in carry-on luggage.

Passengers should continue to check security requirements at their departure airport before traveling.

A spokesperson for the Department of Transportation

A Department for Transport spokesperson told MailOnline: ‘From Sunday 9 June 2024, 100ml liquid restrictions will be temporarily reintroduced for passengers traveling from six regional airports where next-generation security checkpoints ( NGSC) are fully operational.

‘This temporary measure is intended to allow further improvements to be made to the new screening systems and will only affect a small number of passengers.

‘For most passengers, safety measures will remain unchanged.

“Passengers should continue to check security requirements at their departure airport before travelling.”

UK AIRPORT LIQUID RULES

UK Airports and Scanner Status:

  • Birmingham – new scanners / 100ml ruler
  • Leeds Bradford – new scanners / 100ml rule
  • City of London: new scanners / 100ml rule
  • Aberdeen – new scanners / 100 ml rule
  • Southend – new scanners / 100ml ruler
  • Teesside – new scanners/100ml ruler
  • Newcastle – new scanners / 100 ml rule
  • Gatwick – vintage scanners / 100ml ruler
  • Stansted – new scanners / 100 ml ruler
  • East Midlands: old scanners / 100ml rule
  • Manchester – new scanners / 100 ml rule
  • Heathrow – old scanners / 100 ml rule
  • Edinburgh – new scanners / 100 ml rule

Current liquid rules for airports with new scanners:

Bottles must not exceed 100 ml.

Airports control the amount of total liquid (up to two liters) and whether it should be removed from the bags or stored in transparent bags.

UK airports without new scanners applying liquid rules dating back to 2006:

The bottles/containers must not exceed 100 ml.

Liquids must total less than one liter.

Passengers must remove liquids from hand luggage at security

Liquids should be stored in clear plastic bags.

New style liquid rules (to be introduced in the future):

Liquids may be left in luggage at security.

The bottles can be any size and loose inside the bags.

The liquids can add up to two liters.

Travel expert Nicky Kelvin tested the new scanners

travel expert Nicky Kelvin We tested London City Airport’s ‘fancy’ new scanners in May

A passenger is shown walking past an explainer on baggage rules at London City Airport, which has installed new scanners.

A passenger is shown walking past an explainer on baggage rules at London City Airport, which has installed new scanners.

Passengers packaging liquids in bottles larger than 100ml will be subject to manual checks at the airport and those items will be at risk of being discarded.

At airports with new scanners, it is up to each airport whether travelers should pack their liquids in clear plastic bags, remove them from luggage or pack more than a liter of liquid in multiple containers, the Department for Transport confirmed to MailOnline. Travel.

What happens if you travel from an airport other than the six designated by the Department of Transportation?

Several major UK airports have already installed some of the new checkpoints in security lounges; however, none have yet changed their liquid rules.

London-Stansted, Manchester and Edinburgh everyone has at least some of the new 3D scanners installed. However, as their new safe rooms are incomplete and some old scanners still remain, none have changed their liquid rules.

This means you still have to follow the 100ml rule and other liquid restrictions that have been in place for the past 18 years at all three airports.

London-Gatwick, East Midlands Airport and London-Heathrow They have not yet introduced any new scanners, so their secure rooms cannot comply with the new restrictions and the 100ml rule will remain in place for the foreseeable future.

So what happened in Birmingham Airport?

The airport had installed the new scanners, but has been limiting liquids to 100 ml “due to a pending regulatory restriction,” Nick Barton, chief executive, told the bbc.

The airport blames passengers for the long lines, accusing them of packing their bags incorrectly.

The problem worsened, a source said. The independentbecause new scanners mistakenly identify innocent items, such as sunscreen, as “threats.”

Why was the 100ml rule introduced?

The 100ml rule was introduced in 2006 following a foiled terrorist plot to blow up planes flying from London to the United States with homemade liquid bombs.

The restrictions required passengers to pack up to a liter of liquid or less in bottles no larger than 100 ml.

It was stipulated that liquids had to be sealed in a clear plastic bag and removed from the bags before being scanned at security.

Thanks to Nicky Kelvin at The boy with the points to get permission to run your scanner image.

You may also like