Commercial & ice cream house & # 39; from the Georgian era has been excavated in the vicinity of Regent & # 39; s Park

A huge underground Ice House from the 1780s that was used as a shop for nearby pubs and hospitals has been excavated in London.

The ovoid chamber, built of red bricks, was discovered during redevelopment work at Regent & # 39; s Crescent.

The monumental figure that I have mentioned was designed by the acclaimed Welsh architect John Nash, who also built Buckingham Palace in the early 19th century.

The older underground ice house was used by entrepreneur and groundbreaking ice-trader William Leftwich.

Mr. Linkwich imported 300 tons of ice from the Norwegian Lakes in the 1820s to be stored in the cold room.

Clean ice was used to stun patients for medical and dental procedures, as well as for preserving food and creating exotic frozen treats.

A huge underground Ice House from the 1780s that was used as a shop for nearby pubs and hospitals has been excavated in London. Buildings archaeologists incorporate the interior of the regent's ice-cold ice house

The room itself - which measures 7.5 m by 9.5 m (24 ft 7 in at 31 ft 2in) - survived the Blitz despite the destruction of the mews houses above. The underground ice house would have been one of the largest of its kind when it was first built

The room itself – which measures 7.5 m by 9.5 m (24 ft 7 in at 31 ft 2in) – survived the Blitz despite the destruction of the mews houses above. The underground ice house would have been one of the largest of its kind when it was first built

WHERE WAS ICE FOR THE DEEPFRY?

In 1822, after a very mild winter, William Leftwich chartered a ship every 1240 miles (2,000 km) back and forth from Great Yarmouth to Norway to collect 300 tonnes of ice harvested from crystal clear frozen lakes.

The company was not without risk & # 39; s. Earlier imports had been lost at sea, or melted while baffled customs officers found out about how to tax such unique cargo.

Fortunately, in the case of Mr. Leftwich, it was decided in time that the ice would be transported along the Regent Canal and that Mr. Leftwich would make a handsome profit.

The room itself – which measures 7.5 m by 9.5 m (24 ft 7 in at 31 ft 2in) – survived the Blitz despite the destruction of the mews houses above.

The underground ice house would have been one of the largest of its kind when it was first built.

Samuel Dash, who had a family relationship with the brewing industry, is supposed to be behind his original construction.

Decades later, Mr. Linkwich let the Georgian elites of London store and deliver high quality ice cream long before the ice could be artificially produced.

At that time it was fashionable to serve all kinds of frozen deserts and other dishes at sumptuous banquets.

The demand was also high for catering companies, medical institutions and food retailers.

In the winter, the ice was normally collected from local canals and lakes and stored, but it was often dirty and the supply was unreliable.

Mr. Leftwich was one of the first people to recognize the potential for profit in imported ice.

David Sorapure, head of the built heritage in the Archeology of the Museum of London, said: "It is fascinating to think that it was once filled with tons of ice blocks that had been located in the cave-like and beautifully built ice-house in Regent & # 39; s Crescent. traveled across the North Sea and along the Regent Canal to get there.

The structure demonstrates how special it is to serve luxury fashionable frozen sweets and to provide food traders and retailers with ice cream during this time. & # 39;

Made from red bricks, the egg-shaped pod was discovered during redevelopment work at Regent's Crescent. An archaeologist exposes the almost perfect exterior of the Crescent Ice House of the Regent during the excavation in 2015

Made from red bricks, the egg-shaped pod was discovered during redevelopment work at Regent's Crescent. An archaeologist exposes the almost perfect exterior of the Crescent Ice House of the Regent during the excavation in 2015

In the Georgian era it was fashionable to serve all kinds of frozen deserts and other dishes at sumptuous banquets. Close-up view of the inspection of the interior of the Rising Rain ice house

In the Georgian era it was fashionable to serve all kinds of frozen deserts and other dishes at sumptuous banquets. Close-up view of the inspection of the interior of the Rising Rain ice house

In the winter, the ice was normally collected from local canals and lakes and stored, but it was often dirty and the supply was unreliable. A cross-sectional diagram of the Crescent Ice House of the Regent

In the winter, the ice was normally collected from local canals and lakes and stored, but it was often dirty and the supply was unreliable. A cross-sectional diagram of the Crescent Ice House of the Regent

WHAT ARE ICE HOUSES AND HOW DO THEY WORK?

An Ice House – also known as ice pits, ice places or ice points – is a building for storing ice throughout the year.

They date from before the invention of the electricity and the modern refrigerator, which she largely replaced in the fifties.

Written archives for their construction date from 1780 BC, when an ice house was built in the northern Mesopotamian city of Terqa, commissioned by Zimri-Lim, the king of Mari.

Archaeologists have found remnants of ice pits in China from the 7th century BC and there is also written evidence that they used them before 1100 BC.

Alexander the Great used them around 300 BC while it is known that the Romans used them in the 3rd century after Christ.

Ice houses were often partially or completely underground and built in the winter near natural sources of ice, including rivers and freshwater lakes.

Ice and snow would be absorbed in the ice house and insulated against melting with straw or sawdust.

It would remain frozen for many months, even until the following winter, with chunks being broken off from large blocks if needed.

Ice from an ice cream house was most commonly used for the storage of perishable food, but it was also used for cooling drinks and making cold desserts.

Ice halls on a commercial scale were later used to supply companies and hospitals.

Experts believe that from the late 18th century these became common in London.

Most of these are now undiscovered and lost from history, with possibly thousands of underground burials.

In private homes, the servants were often responsible for collecting, storing and collecting ice from the IJshuis.

Once restored, the ice house will be housed in the gardens of Regent & # 39; s Crescent.

They were designed by Kim Wilkie, a world-renowned landscape architect behind the gardens of the Victoria and Albert Museum and the Natural History Museum.

Great Marlborough Estates, owner of the property, is working on restoring the historic features of the crescent along with the ice house.

Built in 1819, the Grade I listed Georgian crescent was originally designed by John Nash, the famous architect behind Buckingham Palace.

The iconic houses were destroyed by the Nazis during the Blitz and then replaced in the 1960s by a replica.

The redevelopment of Regent & # 39; s Crescent, which honors the original vision of Mr. Nash, aims to remain historically authentic, from the shape of the windows to the wash washed with lime on the façade.

The Ice House was later used by entrepreneur and groundbreaking ice cream seller William Leftwich. Workers saw blocks of ice from a frozen lake in Norway around 1900

The Ice House was later used by entrepreneur and groundbreaking ice cream seller William Leftwich. Workers saw blocks of ice from a frozen lake in Norway around 1900

Mr. Linkwich imported 300 tons of ice from the Norwegian Lakes in the 1820s to be stored in the cold room. Ice-cream people handle enormous ice blocks harvested from Norway around 1900

Mr. Linkwich imported 300 tons of ice from the Norwegian Lakes in the 1820s to be stored in the cold room. Ice-cream people handle enormous ice blocks harvested from Norway around 1900

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