Cocaine users rely on Apple Watches to control heart rate

Technology workers have admitted to using cocaine, checking their Apple Watch watches to monitor their status. But those devices only control the heart rate. Cocaine triggers other effects

Users of high cocaine consumption in Silicon Valley have relied on their Apple watches to monitor their health status halfway, according to a new report.

The technical workers, speaking anonymously, told CNBC's Christina Farr that they watch their wrist between the drug lines to decide whether or not to do another.

If your heart rate seems level, they said, it seems safe to continue.

However, a cardiologist warns that cocaine triggers many physiological reactions in the body beyond the increase in heart rate, including spikes in blood pressure that can lead to cardiac arrest.

Technology workers have admitted to using cocaine, checking their Apple Watch watches to monitor their status. But those devices only control the heart rate. Cocaine triggers other effects

Technology workers have admitted to using cocaine, checking their Apple Watch watches to monitor their status. But those devices only control the heart rate. Cocaine triggers other effects

"For many people, heart rate could be a useful guide, but there are many people who do not have a heart rate response," Ethan Weiss, MD, an associate professor at the University of California, San Francisco, told Daily Mail. com.

"They can be lulled by a false sense of security." From what I understand, they are trying to get as far as possible, using the device as a guide. But some people may not see an answer, and meanwhile their blood pressure is 240, their coronary arteries are restricted, and they are having a heart attack. "

Cocaine, a drug in Schedule II, is known as "superior" because it is a stimulant that makes users alert and full of energy.

It stimulates the reward path in the brain, which also reacts to food and sex. Cocaine, however, triggers and an extremely intensified response.

Something like food activates the release of dopamine, which precipitates through neurons to cause a sense of joy. But once you have sent that message, it is picked up by another protein and transported back to the base, so it can be reused.

But cocaine binds to this transporter protein, which means that dopamine keeps pressing on the neuron, as more and more dopamine is released. As a result, there is an accumulation of dopamine that intensifies the feeling of energy and euphoria, making the light and sound more intense, and that touch more sensually.

Any release of dopamine increases the adrenaline in the body, but cocaine does so intensely.

It causes an increase in heart rate and blood pressure, similar to how the body would react to a threat.

The crucial flaw in the use of Fitbit wristbands and Apple watches to track this reaction is that they are only programmed to do one thing: measure heart rate, and it is very unlikely that they will ever be adapted to the needs of drug users. .

"These companies will never run a test to find out if these devices make it safer for people who take drugs," said Dr. Weiss.

& # 39; If we were doing [such a trial] In a hospital, we would see the heart rate, but we would also do an electrocardiogram and we would be analyzing blood pressure because there are many factors. "

Dr. Weiss said that it is not the most outlandish thing that has been found as MD in the Bay Area.

"Nothing surprises me these days," said Dr. Weiss.

"It was a fun experience to think about how this would work in. I tried to get into that, and I thought" oh, this is interesting ", but I quickly got to a point where I was like" what the hell is going on with the world? "

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