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Coca-Cola stops using shrink-wrap plastic for all multipacks cans sold in supermarkets to prevent the use of & # 39; new plastic & # 39; to decrease

Coca-Cola must scrape its plastic shrink film on supermarket packaging while the war against pollution speeds up

  • More than 30 million cola brand packages will move to cardboard in 18 months
  • Contains packages from Fanta, Sprite, Dr. Pepper and Lilt cutting using & # 39; new plastic & # 39;
  • Company hopes & # 39; to ensure that all our packaging is as sustainable as possible & # 39;
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Coca-Cola stops using shrink-wrap plastic for all multi-pack cans sold in supermarkets.

More than 30 million packages from all cola brands, including Fanta, Sprite, Dr Pepper and Lilt, will move to cardboard in the next 18 months.

The move is part of the company's efforts to use & # 39; new plastic & # 39; reducing 4,000 tonnes from its product line in Western Europe.

CEO Jon Woods said: "We take action where possible to ensure that all our packaging is as sustainable as possible."

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Coca-Cola stops using shrink-wrap plastic for all multipacks cans sold in supermarkets to prevent the use of & # 39; new plastic & # 39; to decrease

Coca-Cola stops using shrink-wrap plastic for all multipacks cans sold in supermarkets to prevent the use of & # 39; new plastic & # 39; to decrease

Apart from that, the company has supported the introduction of a deposit and refund scheme for plastic bottles to encourage an increase in collection and recycling.

The plastic shrink film that is currently used on the multipacks is theoretically recyclable. However, nine out of ten municipalities do not accept the material in sidewalk collections. Almost everyone accepts cardboard.

Sprite bottles are switched from green to clear plastic so that they can be recycled into new bottles more easily

Sprite bottles are switched from green to clear plastic so that they can be recycled into new bottles more easily

Sprite bottles are switched from green to clear plastic so that they can be recycled into new bottles more easily

The shrink film is replaced by 100 percent recyclable, sustainably produced cardboard, with FSC certification (Forest Stewardship Council) or PEFC (Program for the Endorsement of Forest Certification).

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The decision of Coca-Cola follows similar steps by a number of beer companies to remove the plastic rings from multi-cans of beer such as Guinness, Carlsberg, Carling and Coors and replace them with cardboard.

The changes further prove how large companies, including manufacturers and supermarkets, are taking radical steps to reduce waste, such as the & # 39; Turn the Tide on Plastic & # 39; campaign. of the Daily Mail.

The switch to cardboard is the latest change from Coca-Cola as part of its sustainable packaging strategy, launched in 2017, in which it has the ambition to work with others to ensure that all its packaging is recovered so that more is recycled and nothing. ends up as waste.

In June, Coca-Cola announced that Glaceau smartwater would be the first brand in Britain to be sold in bottles made from 100% recycled plastic, removing 3,100 tons of new plastic from circulation.

It is also on track to double the recycled content in all its plastic bottles by 2020 and will switch Sprite bottles from green to clear plastic to make them easier to recycle into new bottles.

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It came as Burger King said that as of today it was already removing plastic toys from its children's meals in the UK to save an estimated 320 tons of waste annually.

The fast food chain said the move was part of a wider commitment to reduce the use of plastic, and admitted it was & # 39; encouraged & # 39; by the Southampton Sisters Ella and Caitlin McEwan & # 39; s petition against the use of plastic toys in children's meals.

Burger King installs amnesty boxes in all its restaurants in the UK, where people can deliver free plastic meal toys, including toys given away with sweets or in children's magazines.

The plastic is transformed into new play areas and restaurant items, including interactive trays.

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