Climate in the United Kingdom: 2018 will finally overcome the famous 1976 heat wave?

As the world prepares for another episode of scorching weather, comparisons are made with the record European heat wave of 1976. This map shows the average global temperature recorded in June 1976: red shows temperatures above the average

As Britain prepares for a second period of scorching weather this weekend, experts have warned that this summer could finally break the records set by the infamous 1976 heatwave.

The scorching temperatures in June remained hand in hand with those of June 1976, while July this summer was hotter than its counterpart 42 years ago.

If Britain is hit by a warmer than average August, as predicted by advanced computer models, 2018 could be the hottest summer ever recorded.

This year's prolonged heat is the result of a number of factors, including prolonged high pressure and above-average surface temperatures in the Atlantic Ocean.

Experts have also warned that the rising global temperatures caused by climate change are making the heat waves that take over the northern hemisphere fiercer and more likely.

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As the world prepares for another episode of scorching weather, comparisons are made with the record European heat wave of 1976. This map shows the average global temperature recorded in June 1976: red shows temperatures above the average

As the world prepares for another episode of scorching weather, comparisons are made with the record European heat wave of 1976. This map shows the average global temperature recorded in June 1976: red shows temperatures above the average

This year's heat wave far surpasses that of 1976 when huge red spots spread all over the world. Red patches indicate areas where temperatures were up to 39F higher than normal for that time of year

This year's heat wave far surpasses that of 1976 when huge red spots spread all over the world. Red patches indicate areas where temperatures were up to 39F higher than normal for that time of year

This year's heat wave far surpasses that of 1976 when huge red spots spread all over the world. Red patches indicate areas where temperatures were up to 39F higher than normal for that time of year

Simon Lee, a climate scientist at the University of Reading, told MailOnline: "What makes this heat wave special is that it occurred along with other heat waves in the northern hemisphere during one of the warmest summers in the world. world.

"This summer could surpass 1976 in general, but it will need a month warmer than average August.

"Although warm conditions are expected, it is difficult to say what the final June-August classification will be like."

The summer of 1976 has been described by experts as a "criterion" for heat waves.

HOW IS SUMMER OF 1976 COMPARED TO 2018?

The infamous summer of 1976 has been described as a "criterion" for British heat waves.

Forty-two years later, the heat wave of 2018 can still surpass several records set during the '76.

Summer 1976

The highest temperature: 35.6 ° C (96.1 ° F) in Southampton on June 28.

Longest period above 30 ° C (86 ° F): 18 consecutive days

Longest period without rain: 45 consecutive days in the southwest

Summer 2018

Highest temperature: 35.3 ° C (95.2 ° F) in Faversham, Kent, on July 26.

Longest period above 30 ° C (86 ° F): nine consecutive days

Longest period without rain: 49 consecutive days in Suffolk

Forty-two years ago, Britain experienced a heat wave so severe that the government introduced a Drought Law.

Denis Howell, a minister for drought, was appointed to encourage people to use less water, and was allegedly even ordered to do a rain dance on behalf of the nation.

The average temperatures in June coincided with those of June 1976, reaching 19.9 ° C (68 ° F) – making them the second warmest second in the record.

But July 2018 was hotter than its' 76 counterpart with average temperatures of 22.6 ° C (72 ° F), the second warmest after 2006, which reached 23.2 ° C (73.8 ° F).

July 1976 was the fifth warmest recorded at 21.6 ° C (70.9 ° F).

The record of the heat wave of 76 ° of 18 consecutive days of heat of 30 ° C + (86 ° F +) could also be overcome if current weather trends persist.

WHAT CAUSES SUMMER 2018 GLOBAL HEATWAVE?

There are several major theories about what the recent global heat wave may be causing, according to University of Reading climate scientist Professor Len Shaffrey.

1. Climate change: Temperatures are increasing globally due to the burning of fossil fuels that increase the concentrations of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. The global increase in temperatures means that heat waves are increasingly extreme. In recent years there have been some record temperatures in Europe, for example, the heat wave of 2015 and the heat wave of Lucifer & # 39; of 2017 in Central Europe. Unusually warm summer temperatures have been recorded elsewhere, for example in Canada and Japan, and it is very likely that climate change has played a role here.

2. Temperatures of the North Atlantic Ocean: Temperatures over the North Atlantic Ocean can play a role in establishing the position of the jet stream, which in turn has a profound impact on the climate we experience in the United Kingdom and Ireland. This summer has seen relatively warm temperatures in the North Atlantic in the subtropics and cold ocean temperatures in southern Greenland. It is believed that these influence the high pressure on Europe and push the jet stream further north.

3. The girl: Every few years, ocean temperatures in the Tropical Pacific range from being relatively warm (known as El Niño) and cold (La Niña). Since October of last year, the tropical Pacific has been in a La Niña phase. La Nina is sometimes associated with cold winters in northwestern Europe (for example, the winter of 2010/11 and the recent cold wave in March 2018). However, this year's Nina had begun to weaken around April and had almost disappeared in June, when the current drought in the United Kingdom began.

Four. It is the weather: The above factors influence the type of climate in the United Kingdom and Ireland, but good or bad luck also plays a role, especially in very unusual climates, such as the current heat and dry spell. This summer is no different and the hot, dry weather is partly due to a combination of North Atlantic Ocean temperatures, climate change and climate. If weather patterns continue as they are, then we might expect this summer to be as hot and dry as the extreme summer of 1976.

The highest temperature recorded in 1976 was 35.6 ° C (96.1 ° F) on June 28 in Southampton.

So far this summer, the highest temperature hit is 35.3 ° C (95.2 ° F), which was recorded in Faversham, Kent, on July 26.

Experts told MailOnline that this summer is unlikely to come to an end due to weekend weather.

A spokesman for Met Office said: "Looking at today's weather and the weekend, it seems that temperatures could well reach 31 ° C or even possibly 32 ° C today in the southeast of England and possibly also on Sundays .

"However, it is unlikely that temperatures will reach those recorded at Faversham in July at this stage."

The all-time record temperature in the UK for July is 36.7 ° C (98.1 ° F), which was recorded at Heathrow in July 2015.

The remarkable 1976 heat wave saw the country affected by a severe drought, leaving some families in Wales and western England without tap water for much of the day.

The remarkable 1976 heat wave saw the country affected by a severe drought, leaving some families in Wales and western England without tap water for much of the day.

The remarkable 1976 heat wave saw the country affected by a severe drought, leaving some families in Wales and western England without tap water for much of the day.

Britain has seen its first half of summer drier since 1961, as August began on a scorching note, spreading to the July heat wave that marked the longest in five years. On the photo: Bournemouth beach on Wednesday

Britain has seen its first half of summer drier since 1961, as August began on a scorching note, spreading to the July heat wave that marked the longest in five years. On the photo: Bournemouth beach on Wednesday

Britain has seen its first half of summer drier since 1961, as August began on a scorching note, spreading to the July heat wave that marked the longest in five years. On the photo: Bournemouth beach on Wednesday

In 1976 Britain was hit by 18 consecutive days of heat of 30 ° C + (86 ° F +) – twice the longest race in 2018 so far.

Meteorologists say that both heat waves are the result of warmer surface waters in the Atlantic Ocean and persistent high pressures above Europe.

Periods of high air pressure circulate periodically over the Earth, which causes temperatures to rise well above the average.

But this pressure is rarely maintained for such a long period.

The average daily average temperature in June 1976 was 15 ° C (59 ° F). This is still the highest since records began. The provisional figure for June 2018 is 14.8C (58.6F), which would rank as the third highest recorded

The average daily average temperature in June 1976 was 15 ° C (59 ° F). This is still the highest since records began. The provisional figure for June 2018 is 14.8C (58.6F), which would rank as the third highest recorded

The average daily average temperature in June 1976 was 15 ° C (59 ° F). This is still the highest since records began. The provisional figure for June 2018 is 14.8C (58.6F), which would rank as the third highest recorded

The sustained pressure is caused by a weak jet stream: the column of strong winds that is between five and seven miles (8-11 km) above the surface of the Earth and that controls the climatic patterns of the planet.

The current is formed over long periods due to temperature differences between the northern and southern hemispheres, and at its weakest point produces established weather patterns that keep temperatures unchanged for days, or even weeks at a time.

The jet streams of 1976 were extremely weak, like the one we are currently experiencing.

This means that high-pressure areas form in parts of the northern hemisphere and take a long time to advance, experts said.

The Met forecast has warned that parts of Spain and Portugal will ignite with temperatures that will range between 104 ° F (40 ° C) and 118 ° F (48 ° C) in the coming days from the Iberian cloud that is heating the United Kingdom.

The Met forecast has warned that parts of Spain and Portugal will ignite with temperatures that will range between 104 ° F (40 ° C) and 118 ° F (48 ° C) in the coming days from the Iberian cloud that is heating the United Kingdom.

The map shows that Spain and Portugal could surpass the highest temperatures recorded this week to a scorching 118F (48C)

The map shows that Spain and Portugal could surpass the highest temperatures recorded this week to a scorching 118F (48C)

The Met Office warned that parts of Spain and Portugal will ignite with temperatures that will range between 104º F (40º C) and 118ºF (48º C) in the next few days from the Iberian cloud that is also heating up the United Kingdom.

Jet streams are the result of a complex combination of phenomena and become especially weak during the summer months when there is only a small temperature difference between the northern and southern regions on both sides of the stream.

An unusual mixture of cold water near Greenland and near the British Isles, as well as warm waters farther south, has been linked to hot, dry summers in the United Kingdom.

The addition of sustained high pressure means that warm weather patterns do not move eastward, which causes long periods of heat.

Speaking to MailOnline last month, Professor Len Shaffrey, climate scientist at the University of Reading, said: "High pressure means that the storms we occasionally receive this time of year are being directed much further north, towards Iceland.

"The high-pressure system is unusually persistent and has been accumulating in Europe during the spring and early summer."

Forty-two years ago, Britain experienced a heat wave so severe that the government introduced a Drought Law. The parched and cracked bottom of the Ladybower reservoir is seen up in 1976

Forty-two years ago, Britain experienced a heat wave so severe that the government introduced a Drought Law. The parched and cracked bottom of the Ladybower reservoir is seen up in 1976

Forty-two years ago, Britain experienced a heat wave so severe that the government introduced a Drought Law. The parched and cracked bottom of the Ladybower reservoir is seen up in 1976

Scientists warned last week that the rising global temperatures caused by human activity are making the heat waves that hold the northern hemisphere more likely.

Professor Peter Stott, a science intern at Met Office, compared the best chance of a heat wave to roll a die and get a six, but that climate change was weighing the dice.

"What we've seen this summer are repeated pitches throwing a six in different parts of the world.

"If you get a six over and over again, start thinking" This is not normal, someone has given me a loaded dice ".

Pictured is a section of the Wayoh reservoir traversed by the Armsgrove viaduct in Edgworth near Bolton on Wednesday.

Pictured is a section of the Wayoh reservoir traversed by the Armsgrove viaduct in Edgworth near Bolton on Wednesday.

Pictured is a section of the Wayoh reservoir traversed by the Armsgrove viaduct in Edgworth near Bolton on Wednesday.

He said that the chances of the 2003 heat wave in Europe occurring were more than doubled by climate change, and climate model predictions that heat waves would increase in frequency "are becoming reality before our eyes".

He said the "jury is out" on the extent to which climate change is affecting the jet stream, whose current pattern maintains a high-pressure area in western Britain and causes a hot, dry climate.

But he said: "This summer a pattern has been established, and what that means when it is in this pattern, the Arctic temperatures are much warmer, and the temperatures are globally much warmer, it is feeding these heat waves."

The key to the heat waves of 1976 and 2018 is the combination of several meteorological phenomena that come together at the same time.

A scorching heat wave nicknamed Pluma Ibérica has invaded Britain, bringing temperatures to a scorching 90F on Friday. In the photo: Student, Anuschka Pinto, 21, takes a walk on Bournemouth beach today

A scorching heat wave nicknamed Pluma Ibérica has invaded Britain, bringing temperatures to a scorching 90F on Friday. In the photo: Student, Anuschka Pinto, 21, takes a walk on Bournemouth beach today

A scorching heat wave nicknamed Pluma Ibérica has invaded Britain, bringing temperatures to a scorching 90F on Friday. In the photo: Student, Anuschka Pinto, 21, takes a walk on Bournemouth beach today

HOW DID THE HIGH GLOBAL TEMPERATURES REACH DURING THE HEAT BURNER OF JULY 2018?

Temperature records throughout the world were destroyed by an unusual global heat wave in late June and early July 2018.

The suffocating heat cracked the roads and buckled the rooftops of all of Britain, when Motherwell reached the highest temperature ever recorded in Scotland at 91.8 ° F (33.2 ° C). The previous record was 91.2 ° F (32.9 ° C) established in August 2003 at Greycrook.

Glasgow had its hottest day recorded, reaching 89.4 ° F (31.9 ° C).

In Ireland, on June 28, Belfast also hit a record, reaching 85.1 ° F (29.5 ° C). Shannon also reached his own record at 89.6 ° F (32 ° C). In Northern Ireland, Castlederg reached 86.2 ° F (30.1 ° C) on June 29, its highest record.

In Canada, Montreal broke its previous record of the highest temperature, since the readings showed 97.9 ° F (36.6 ° C)

Ottawa published its most extreme combination of heat and humidity on July 1.

Meanwhile, in the United States, Denver, the capital of the state of Colorado, tied its historic high temperature record of 105 ° F (40 ° C) on June 28.

Burlington, in Vermont, set its lowest temperature of all time, registering a minimum of 80 ° F (27 ° C) within the 24-hour period on July 2.

While the western European islands burned in their own heat wave, Eurasia was also baking.

Yerevan, in the Soviet state of Armenia, saw temperatures rise to 107.6 ° F (42 ° C).

Russia, the host country of the World Cup this year, is also in the midst of a heat wave and several places in the southern part of the world's largest country equaled or exceeded its warmer temperatures in June.

In the Middle East nation of Oman, the lowest temperature for 24 hours on June 28 was 108.7 ° F (42.6 ° C) in the coastal city of Quriyat.

These fantastic numbers come a few months after Pakistan recorded the highest temperature ever seen on Earth.

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