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England Test captain Joe Root continued to play despite being hospitalized during the fifth test of the Ashes series 2017-18 in Sydney

According to a new report, some of the longest held traditions of cricket can be threatened by climate change.

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Leading scientists and sports physiologists joined forces to investigate the current and future impact of climate change and extreme heat on sports in countries where cricket is played.

Radical changes were recommended to take physical and mental toll on players Hit for Six report released this week at Lord & # 39; s in London.

One of the most radical changes was the suggestion that players would soon be able to take off the traditional shorts for shorts.

England Test captain Joe Root continued to play despite being hospitalized during the fifth test of the Ashes series 2017-18 in Sydney

England Test captain Joe Root continued to play despite being hospitalized during the fifth test of the Ashes series 2017-18 in Sydney

& # 39; Clothing should be able to change to make it easier for batsmen to evaporate sweat & # 39 ;, the report states.

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Cr Cricket authorities may consider allowing players to wear shorts under extreme conditions, while major equipment and equipment manufacturers are advised to speed up testing of helmets, gloves and protective padding that improve airflow and keep players cool & # 39;

The report states that the impact of climate change will increase in the future, but that it is now taking place.

During the British summer heat wave of 2018, Lord & # 39; s took the unusual step of temporarily relaxing clothing codes for members.

As the temperature continues to rise, the consequences for cricket are more games that are delayed until cooler times of the day, poor player performance and an increased chance of heat exhaustion and other heat-related illnesses.

The report praised Australia for updating its heat policy, urging other countries to follow its example

The report praised Australia for updating its heat policy, urging other countries to follow its example

The report praised Australia for updating its heat policy, urging other countries to follow its example

The report used the example of the English captain Joe Root, who was hospitalized during the final test at the Sydney Cricket Ground in the Ashes series 2017-18.

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Root suffered from vomiting and diarrhea before the start of the last day of the series.

& # 39; The ambient temperature at weather stations near the ground reached 43.7C. It is likely that he suffered from a gastrointestinal infection and the resulting dehydration, both of which, as noted, increase the likelihood of heat related problems occurring, & the report said.

Root continued recording half a century before retiring due to illness.

Australia has since updated its heat policy, while other countries have urged the report to follow their lead.

Eight of the ten hottest years in Australia's history have taken place since 2005.

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If global warming continues at the current speed, Adelaide and Perth see a 60 percent increase in 40 ° C plus days by 2030.

A new report recommends that trousers be thrown away for shorts on hot days. Depicted is the Australian fast bowler Josh Hazlewood

A new report recommends that trousers be thrown away for shorts on hot days. Depicted is the Australian fast bowler Josh Hazlewood

A new report recommends that trousers be thrown away for shorts on hot days. Depicted is the Australian fast bowler Josh Hazlewood

Cricket unions in some of the most popular parts of Australia have since adapted playing conditions to deal with the heat.

At Red Cliffs Cricket Association in northeastern Victoria, games are now called off when the temperature reaches 42 ° C.

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& # 39; We broke the record last January when we were looking for a cool change to be below 40C and we passed 46C for three consecutive days, said club secretary Peter Kelly ABC.

& # 39; I've never had anything like this. It was a few hot days and now we get weeks of it. & # 39;

The hospitalization of Joe Root (photo) during the Ashes series 2017-18 in Australia emphasized the physical and mental toll that players have in heat wave conditions

The hospitalization of Joe Root (photo) during the Ashes series 2017-18 in Australia emphasized the physical and mental toll that players have in heat wave conditions

The hospitalization of Joe Root (photo) during the Ashes series 2017-18 in Australia emphasized the physical and mental toll that players have in heat wave conditions

The report also urged cricket authorities to invest in water efficiency initiatives to minimize the drainage of the game on regional and national water resources.

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The Australian Conservation Foundation campaign director, Dr. Paul Sinclair, is also president of the Youlden Parkville Cricket Club in Melbourne.

The club is the first in the world to become a member of the UN Sport and Climate Action Initiative. Dr. Sinclair has urged Cricket Australia to follow this example.

& # 39; Cricket runs the risk of being toppled by climate change, & # 39; said Dr. Sinclair.

& # 39; Climate change means more games postponed, an increased chance of heat stroke, and poorer performance due to heat-affected cognitive decline. & # 39;

The report found that batsmen and wicket keepers were most at risk of suffering from heat-related conditions when playing on hot days.

The report found that batsmen and wicket keepers were most at risk of suffering from heat-related conditions when playing on hot days.

The report found that batsmen and wicket keepers were most at risk of suffering from heat-related conditions when playing on hot days.

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