Civil War General Robert E Lee’s relationship says removing connected symbols is a no brainer

General Robert E Lee’s great-great-great-great-nephew has described the removal of connected symbols as ‘a no brainer’ amid Black Lives Matter.

Pastor Robert Lee IV claimed that the flags have become “idols of white supremacy and racism.”

The connected symbol came into existence when 13 southern states split from the rest of the U.S. between 1861 and 1865 because of the threat President Abraham Lincoln posed to the future of slavery.

“This is a good idea. This is a matter of justice and peace, “he said ABC news. “This is the first domino of many dominoes that can fall and really shape our outlook on our future.”

Reverend Robert Lee IV (pictured on June 4 in Richmond, Virginia) claimed that Southern flags have become 'idols of white supremacy and racism'

Reverend Robert Lee IV (pictured on June 4 in Richmond, Virginia) claimed that Southern flags have become ‘idols of white supremacy and racism’

He admitted that he always hung the flag on his bedroom, but he took it away when he became a minister.

His ancestor commanded the Northern Virginia army from 1862 until its surrender in 1865 and earned a reputation as a skilled tactician.

Rev. Lee said his ancestor was fighting “for the continued slavery of black people” and that the flag of the time should not be in the city’s squares.

In early 1865, after four years of heavy fighting and 620,000 to 850,000 military deaths, all Southern troops surrendered, most symbolically, in the surrender of Confederate General Robert E. Lee to Ulysses S. Grant in Appomattox on April 9 1865.

The JRB Stuart Monument in Richmond, Virginia, is one of many Confederate statues activists campaign to destroy

The JRB Stuart Monument in Richmond, Virginia, is one of many Confederate statues activists campaign to destroy

The JRB Stuart Monument in Richmond, Virginia, is one of many Confederate statues activists campaign to destroy

Mississippi yesterday knocked out the last state flag in the US with the Confederate battle emblem

Mississippi yesterday knocked out the last state flag in the US with the Confederate battle emblem

Mississippi yesterday knocked out the last state flag in the US with the Confederate battle emblem

A 'noose' was found in the garage box of Bubba Wallace (above), the only black driver in the NASCAR racing series, at Talladega Superspeedway in Alabama on Sunday, June 22.  Later it was found a rope puller for a garage door.

A 'noose' was found in the garage box of Bubba Wallace (above), the only black driver in the NASCAR racing series, at Talladega Superspeedway in Alabama on Sunday, June 22.  Later it was found a rope puller for a garage door.

A ‘noose’ was found in the garage box of Bubba Wallace (above), the only black driver in the NASCAR racing series, at Talladega Superspeedway in Alabama on Sunday, June 22. Later it was found a rope puller for a garage door.

The issue was brought up earlier this month by NASAAR’s only black driver and an Alabama resident, Bubba Wallace, who called for a ban on the Southern flag and said there was “no place” in the sport.

The ban was announced for a race at Martinsville Speedway in Virginia, where Wallace drove Richard Petty Motorsports’ # 43 Chevrolet in a # BlackLivesMatter livery.

Dressed in an American flag mask, Wallace clapped his hands when asked about the decision before the start of the race.

He wore a black ‘I Can’t Breathe’ T-shirt, but did not kneel during the national anthem.

His Chevy had ‘Compassion, Love, Understanding’ on the hood.

However, the decision was marred when it was later alleged that a noose was found in Wallace’s garage box during the NASCAR race in Alabama on Sunday, June 22 – less than two weeks after successfully pushing the car racing series for the Confederate flag. on its tracks and facilities.

A follow-up investigation found that the rope was actually used as a garage door puller and had been in place for months.

NASCAR officially banned the Southern flag from its race tracks on June 10. It had said five years ago that it would no longer allow fans to display the Southern flag at events, but never did anything to enforce the ban.

Now, in response to Wallace’s call not to allow the flag, serial leaders say they are taking enforcement seriously.

Vehicles lined the boulevard outside the speedway, waving the flag

Vehicles lined the boulevard outside the speedway, waving the flag

Vehicles lined the boulevard outside the speedway, waving the flag

The decision on the ban caused loyalists of the Southern flag to cry in protest and vowed to renounce the sport.

Truck Series driver Ray Ciccarelli posted on Facebook that he would quit the sport and wrote, “I couldn’t care less about the Confederate Flag, but there are those who do and that doesn’t make them a racist.

NASCAR helmet artist Jason Beam tweeted “ignorance wins again, NASCAR you realize the north had slaves too, not just the south, you want to remove the American flag too, you idiots.” And a publicist for a NASCAR driver tweeted that the decision was “a joke.”

Meanwhile, Mississippi has retired the last state flag in the U.S. with the Confederate battle emblem.

Republican Governor Tate Reeves signed the historic bill at the Governor’s Mansion on Tuesday, immediately lifting official status for the 126-year-old banner that has been a source of division for generations.

“This is not a political moment for me, but a solemn opportunity to get our Mississippi family to come together, reconcile and move on,” Reeves said on live TV just before signing.

“We are resilient people determined by our hospitality. We are a people of great faith.

“Now, more than ever, we must rely on that belief, leave our divisions behind, and unite for a greater good.”

A broad coalition of lawmakers passed the landmark law on Sunday to change the flag, culminating in a weekend of emotional debate and decades of efforts by black lawmakers and others who see the rebel emblem as a symbol of hatred

A broad coalition of lawmakers passed the landmark law on Sunday to change the flag, culminating in a weekend of emotional debate and decades of efforts by black lawmakers and others who see the rebel emblem as a symbol of hatred

A broad coalition of legislators passed Sunday’s landmark legislation to change the flag, culminating in a weekend of emotional debate and decades of efforts by black lawmakers and others who see the rebel emblem as a symbol of hatred

Mississippi is under increasing pressure to change its flag since protests against racial injustice have drawn attention to Southern symbols in recent weeks.

A broad coalition of legislators has passed landmark law to change the flag, culminating in a weekend of emotional debate and decades of efforts by black lawmakers and others who see the rebel emblem as a symbol of hatred.

The Confederate battle emblem has a red field with a blue X with 13 white stars on it. White supremacist lawmakers placed it in the top left corner of the Mississippi flag in 1894, as whites suppressed the political power African Americans had acquired after the civil war.

Critics have said for generations that it is wrong for a state where 38 percent of people are black to have a flag marked by the Confederacy, especially since the Ku Klux Klan and other hate groups have used the symbol to represent racist agendas to promote.

Mississippi voters chose to hold the flag at a 2001 statewide election, with supporters saying they saw the flag as a symbol of southern heritage. But since then, a growing number of cities and all of the state’s public universities have given up.

Several black legislators, and a few white ones, insisted for years to change it.

After a white gunman who posed with the Southern flag killed black worshipers in a South Carolina church in 2015, Mississippi’s Republican House Speaker Philip Gunn said his religious affiliation forced him to say that Mississippi symbolized his flag .

The issue was still widely regarded as too fleeting for lawmakers to touch until Mr Floyd’s death was taken into police custody, sparking weeks of protests against racial injustice protested, followed by calls for the removal of Southern symbols.

A flood of young activists, college athletes, and business, religion, education, and sports leaders called on Mississippi to make this change, finally giving lawmakers the momentum to vote.

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