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City worker who lost her job because of the corona virus says she is ‘now poor’ and dependent on food banks

‘I used to shop at Waitrose and M&S … now I’m going to the food bank’: City worker who lost job due to coronavirus says she is ‘now poor’ with only £ 30 left after paying her mortgage every month

  • The maid, who bore the false name “Alice,” revealed that she was forced to seek charity
  • Initially, she tried to distract herself from hunger by listening to podcasts
  • Was terrified that he was turned down from food banks because he looked prosperous
  • Food Bank chief urged people to seek help, regardless of their background
  • Read more about how you can help people affected by COVID

A city worker who lost her job because of the corona virus says she is ‘now poor’ with only £ 30 a month left after mortgage payments.

Under the pseudonym Alice, the woman revealed how she used to shop at Waitrose and Marks and Spencer, but was forced to search for food banks.

“I was used to having extra money to save that I could run errands at Waitrose, Marks and Spencer and then suddenly earn nothing more – you’re basically poor now,” she told the BBC. Today show on Radio 4.

Volunteers are depicted at Paddington Foodbank in London as more people are forced to seek out charity groups for basics due to the coronavirus crisis

Volunteers are depicted at Paddington Foodbank in London as more people are forced to seek out charity groups for basics due to the coronavirus crisis

Before going to the food bank, she had tried to ignore the hunger she survived from two meals a day by listening to podcasts.

“I’d have a bowl of porridge in the morning and then a lunch of homemade soup, sometimes a few slices of toast,” she said. “It was a very bad diet – I was constantly hungry.”

She was terrified of picking up free food packages for fear of being noticed.

Alice said the thought of visiting the charity left her with heart palpitations as she feared the volunteers would wonder why someone who sounds prosperous and looks good needed their vital services.

She was relieved when the volunteers came to her rescue without a doubt, as food banks now expect people who were previously well-to-do to visit because of job losses from the corona virus.

But she said she is still too scared to tell her friends and family that she trusts charities or to ask for their help, so she uses a fake name.

She said, “give in to friends and family? Well I don’t have that. They know I’m not working, but when they ask me if I’m fine, I say I’m fine. Maybe I should be more honest and say “well actually, now you name it”. But you don’t. ‘

James Quale of the North Paddington food bank told the show that they go beyond what they could ever have imagined and that they have increased home delivery by thousands of percent in just two weeks.

He stressed that no one in need of help, regardless of background, should worry about using the service.

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