Cigarette smoke makes MRSA more resistant to antibiotics

Cigarette smoke can make MRSA even more resistant to antibiotics, scientists now fear.

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Researchers discovered that some species of the superug became stronger after being exposed to smoke.

Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is already resistant to various commonly used antibiotics.

Experts from the University of Bath called for further tests and said they are currently unsure whether the finding could affect people.

They believe that the chemicals in smoke cause an emergency response in the bacteria, causing them to mutate faster.

Researchers discovered that some types of the superug became stronger after being exposed to cigarette smoke

Researchers discovered that some types of the superug became stronger after being exposed to cigarette smoke

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The researchers exposed six different MRSA strains – and other strains of S aureus – to tobacco smoke in the laboratory.

The smoke came from lighting only one cigarette – but they were exposed for up to six hours, the scientists warned.

The six different MRSA strains are known to cause disorders, including pneumonia and endocarditis, which can kill both.

Three of the tribes acquired by the community – those that infect healthy people – were better able to survive in cigarette smoke.

Other strains of the super bacterium also showed more resistance to rifampicin, a crucial antibiotic that was distributed to MRSA patients.

Health officials in the UK tell doctors that they should not only administer rifampicin when dealing with an MRSA patient because & # 39; resistance can develop quickly & # 39 ;.

Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is already resistant to various commonly used antibiotics

Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is already resistant to various commonly used antibiotics

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Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is already resistant to various commonly used antibiotics

WHAT IS ANTIBIOTIC RESISTANCE?

Antibiotics have been dispensed unnecessarily by general practitioners and hospital staff for decades, so that once harmless bacteria are supplied with super poison.

The World Health Organization (WHO) has warned earlier if nothing is done, the world is moving towards a & # 39; post-antibiotic & # 39; age.

It claimed that common infections, such as chlamydia, will become murderers without immediate solutions to the growing crisis.

Bacteria can become resistant to medicines if people take the wrong doses of antibiotics or if they are distributed unnecessarily.

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Chief medical officer Dame Sally Davies claimed in 2016 that the threat of antibiotic resistance is just as serious as terrorism.

Figures estimate that superugs will kill 10 million people every year by 2050, with patients succumbing to once harmless insects.

About 700,000 people die every year as a result of drug-resistant infections, including tuberculosis (TB), HIV and malaria around the world.

There have been repeated concerns that drugs will be returned to the & # 39; dark ages & # 39; if antibiotics will no longer be effective in the coming years.

In addition to the fact that existing drugs are becoming less effective, only one or two new antibiotics have been developed in the last 30 years.

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In September the WHO warned that antibiotics are running out & # 39; because in a report a & # 39; serious defect & # 39; new drugs in the development pipeline.

Without antibiotics, C-sections, cancer treatments and hip prostheses, it was said to be incredibly risky & # 39;

The team, which published their findings in the journal Scientific Reports, warned that smoke could also cause resistance to other antibiotics.

Other tests showed that some strains of S aureus, estimated to be worn by 60% of people, became more invasive and persistent.

This is believed to be because the smoke is a & # 39; hardy & # 39; subpopulation in insects, called small colony variants.

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Lead author Dr. Maisem Laabei said: “We had expected some effects, but we did not expect smoke to affect drug resistance to this extent.

& # 39; Based on our research and others, it seems reasonable to assume that stressful conditions imposed by smoking cause reactions in microbial cells. & # 39;

This then leads to & # 39; adaptation to harsh conditions, with the net effect of increasing virulence and / or potential for infection, & # 39; Laabei ready.

He said the team recognizes that exposure to smoke in a laboratory & # 39; otherwise & # 39; is then the long-term inhalation of smoke.

Dr. However, Laabei and colleagues hope that the results provide another reason for people not to smoke and for current smokers to quit.

The scientists now want to discover whether pollution, in particular from diesel exhaust gases, can have a similar effect on bacteria.

The team worked with experts from Imperial College London and the University of Oxford, and with academics in institutions in Spain.

Antibiotic resistance is listed by the World Health Organization as one of the top 10 threats to human health, in addition to cancer, global warming and ebola.

It happens when a bacterium evolves to become strong enough to survive an antibiotic treatment, and is caused by exposure to low amounts of the drugs for a long time.

Some strains of the STI gonorrhea already show signs of responding to first-line medicines, and there are fears when easy-to-treat diseases become fatal.

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Figures estimate that superugs will kill ten million people every year by 2050, with patients succumbing to once harmless insects.

About 700,000 people die every year as a result of drug-resistant infections, including tuberculosis (TB), HIV and malaria around the world.

There have been repeated concerns that drugs will be returned to the & # 39; dark ages & # 39; if antibiotics will no longer be effective in the coming years.

WHAT IS MRSA?

Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a type of bacterium that is resistant to various commonly used antibiotics, making it particularly difficult to treat.

By catching the infection early, it can spread and infect others.

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About 30 percent of people even carry Staphylococcus aureus bacteria in their nose, armpits, groin or buttocks without realizing it.

This can enter the body's bloodstream and release toxic toxins that kill up to one-fifth of infected patients.

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MRSA is usually associated with hospitals.

In addition to being highly resistant to drugs, current screening methods are rather inaccurate, allowing the infection to spread while a patient is moving both inside and outside hospitals.

Even when the infection is successfully treated, it doubles the average duration of a patient's hospital stay and increases healthcare costs.

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The WHO has recently identified MRSA as a high priority on its list for research and development of new drugs.

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