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Church where the coronation of the ‘first king of England’ is unearthed in Bath

The lost Anglo-Saxon abbey where Edgar the Pacific was crowned as “the first king of all England” in 973 AD is unearthed in Bath

  • King Edgar the Pacific was crowned as King of all England in 973 AD.
  • He unified the nation before his death and is considered the first king of all England.
  • He was the father of Ethelred the Unready and Edward the Martyr, both future kings of England.

The Anglo-Saxon abbey, long lost, where Edgar the Pacific was crowned as King of England in 973 AD, could finally have been discovered by archaeologists in Bath.

The monarch ascended the throne after the death of his older brother in 959 AD, but was not crowned until 973 AD – 14 years later.

His coronation consolidated his place as divine ruler and made him the first king to be formally recognized by God. He was the first king to rule over all regions of Great Britain, from Scotland to Mercia and Wessex.

The coronation established the plan for all future kings and queens.

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The semicircular relics (pictured) were found by a Wessex Archeology team during renovation work at Bath Abbey

The semicircular relics (pictured) were found by a Wessex Archeology team during renovation work at Bath Abbey

For a long time it was thought that the site of Bath Abbey (pictured) housed an Anglo-Saxon monastery, but evidence was never found

For a long time it was thought that the site of Bath Abbey (pictured) housed an Anglo-Saxon monastery, but evidence was never found

For a long time it was thought that the site of Bath Abbey (pictured) housed an Anglo-Saxon monastery, but evidence was never found

Who was Edgar the Pacific?

In the photo, Edgar the Pacific that presided over a stable period of 14 years.

In the photo, Edgar the Pacific that presided over a stable period of 14 years.

In the photo, Edgar the Pacific that presided over a stable period of 14 years.

King Edgar the Pacific, son of Edmund I and Ælfgifu of Shaftesbury and brother of Eadwig, became a monarch in 959 AD and ruled for 16 years.

He was only a teenager when he ascended the throne after the death of his older brother and decided to have his coronation in Bath.

It is also believed to be short, according to surviving contemporary records.

However, his rein was known for its stability.

After his famous coronation in Bath in 973 AD.

The ceremony was devised by Edgar and his advisor St Dunstan, archbishop of Canterbury, and was largely based on the Franco-Western imperial coronations (Carolingians) and explicitly emphasized that Edgar was king by the will of God.

It is said that he went to Chester and met six kings of England.

Edgar was the first crowned king of England, joining the kingdoms of Wessex, Mercia and Northumbria into a single political entity.

It is said that the kings, including the King of Scotland, the King of Strathclyde, Cumbria, Gwynedd, Morgannwg and the Norse-controlled York, have expressed their loyalty to Edgar paddling in their state barge across the River Dee.

He died two years later, but is considered the first king who united the many regions of Britain under one rule.

A Wessex Archeology team found semicircular relics during renovation work at Bath Abbey.

They were dated between the 8th and 10th centuries AD. C. and experts believe it could be the place of coronation of King Edgar.

The structures were found south of the modern Abbey, below street level but above the Roman remains that are prior to the site.

The plaster of the discovered remains contained coal and were sent to Queen’s University, Belfast, for radiocarbon analysis.

The dates returned as AD 780-970 and AD 670-770, to the delight of Cai Mason, Chief Wessex Archeology Project Officer.

He said: ‘The most likely place to find this type of structure is at the east end of an ecclesiastical building, such as a church or chapel, and since the excavated structures are surrounded by late Saxon burials, this is the most likely explanation place for use

“This, together with the stone works and late Saxon burials found in the Abbey, provides ever stronger evidence that we have actually found part of the lost Anglo-Saxon monastery in Bath.”

It is believed that the site of Bath Abbey was home to an Anglo-Saxon monastery, but evidence was never found.

The two structures were discovered during excavations as part of the Footprint project of Bath Abbey.

He hopes to restore the collapse of the Abbey floor, install an ecological heating system using Bath’s famous hot springs and create new facilities to improve its hospitality, worship and city service.

King Edgar the Pacific, son of Edmund I and Ælfgifu of Shaftesbury and brother of Eadwig, became a monarch in 959 AD and ruled for 16 years.

He was only a teenager when he ascended the throne after the death of his older brother and decided to have his coronation in Bath.

It is believed that the Anglo-Saxon monastery was the specific site.

The findings of the building’s physical form add weight to this belief.

Reverend Canon Guy Bridgewater in Bath Abbey said: ‘This is a really exciting find.

‘While we have always known that once there was an Anglo-Saxon monastery on this site, today there is no trace of the building.

“So it is surprising that we now have a real record of it and can have a real idea of ​​what it was.”

In the photo, the place of Edgar the Pacific in the ancestry of the British monarchy. It was believed that his eldest son, Edward, was illegitimate and only became king briefly. He was deposed in favor of his younger brother, who was only ten years old, Ethelred the Unready

In the photo, the place of Edgar the Pacific in the ancestry of the British monarchy. It was believed that his eldest son, Edward, was illegitimate and only became king briefly. He was deposed in favor of his younger brother, who was only ten years old, Ethelred the Unready

In the photo, the place of Edgar the Pacific in the ancestry of the British monarchy. It was believed that his eldest son, Edward, was illegitimate and only became king briefly. He was deposed in favor of his younger brother, who was only ten years old, Ethelred the Unready

The Bath Abbey site has a complex history featuring Romans, Anglo-Saxons and various renovations. Work in progress has discovered the latest relics

The Bath Abbey site has a complex history featuring Romans, Anglo-Saxons and various renovations. Work in progress has discovered the latest relics

The Bath Abbey site has a complex history featuring Romans, Anglo-Saxons and various renovations. Work in progress has discovered the latest relics

Wessex's Senior Archeology Project Officer, Cai Mason, said the most likely place to find the relic structures is in an ecclesiastical building, such as a church or chapel

Wessex's Senior Archeology Project Officer, Cai Mason, said the most likely place to find the relic structures is in an ecclesiastical building, such as a church or chapel

Wessex’s Senior Archeology Project Officer, Cai Mason, said the most likely place to find the relic structures is in an ecclesiastical building, such as a church or chapel

King Edgar the Pacific, son of Edmund I and Ælfgifu of Shaftesbury and brother of Eadwig, became a monarch in 959 AD and ruled for 16 years.

King Edgar the Pacific, son of Edmund I and Ælfgifu of Shaftesbury and brother of Eadwig, became a monarch in 959 AD and ruled for 16 years.

King Edgar the Pacific, son of Edmund I and Ælfgifu of Shaftesbury and brother of Eadwig, became a monarch in 959 AD and ruled for 16 years.

The two structures were discovered during excavations below street level, south of the current Abbey church, as part of the Bath Abbey Footprint project.

The two structures were discovered during excavations below street level, south of the current Abbey church, as part of the Bath Abbey Footprint project.

The two structures were discovered during excavations below street level, south of the current Abbey church, as part of the Footprint Footprint Abbey project.

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