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Alex Deliou, 31, from Leeds, started eight years ago with debilitating cluster headache, where even the strongest painkillers could not reduce her pain

A woman suffering from debilitating migraine revealed how changing the type of wine she drank cured her headache – when she discovered she was intolerant to Chardonnay grapes.

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Alex Deliou, 31, from Leeds, began to experience chronic cluster headache eight years ago, with even the strongest painkillers unable to reduce her pain.

The retail manager said they were appointed when she drank only one glass of wine and was often so acute that she had trouble seeing clearly or talking.

But after a food intolerance test, she discovered she was sensitive to Chardonnay grapes – the fruit used in her favorite drink.

Alex Deliou, 31, from Leeds, started eight years ago with debilitating cluster headache, where even the strongest painkillers could not reduce her pain

Alex Deliou, 31, from Leeds, started eight years ago with debilitating cluster headache, where even the strongest painkillers could not reduce her pain

After swapping for another white wine, her symptoms have since completely disappeared.

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She told FEMAIL: & I never suspected that wine was the cause of my terrible migraine because I never drank too much.

& # 39; The pain was often so bad that I could not see clearly or could speak coherently. I was clearly worried that something more serious was playing, like everyone else would be.

& # 39; I never combined two and two that Chardonnay grapes were the problem.

& # 39; It is definitely something that other migraine sufferers should be aware of. & # 39;

Retail manager Alex said that her migraine was often so acute that she had trouble seeing or talking clearly

Retail manager Alex said that her migraine was often so acute that she had trouble seeing or talking clearly

Retail manager Alex said that her migraine was often so acute that she had trouble seeing or talking clearly

The test also showed that Alex has a mild intolerance to yeast, so nowadays she usually sticks to gin when she goes out – and claims that she feels completely good afterwards.

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It is thought that around six million people in the UK suffer from migraine – a severe headache felt like a throbbing pain in the side of the head.

The condition came in the news earlier this week after the National Institute of Health and Care Excellence (NICE) said that a revolutionary new migraine drug – Erenumab – would not be available to NHS patients outside of Scotland.

That decision was simply attacked by charities, with The Migraine Trust calling it a & # 39; very bad day for chronic migraine sufferers & # 39 ;.

But identifying hidden food sensitivities can be an alternative method to combat migraine, says biochemist Dr. Gill Hart.

A food intolerance test discovered that Alex is sensitive to Chardonnay grapes - the fruit used in her favorite drink

A food intolerance test discovered that Alex is sensitive to Chardonnay grapes - the fruit used in her favorite drink

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A food intolerance test discovered that Alex is sensitive to Chardonnay grapes – the fruit used in her favorite drink

Dr. Hart, scientific director of YorkTest Laboratories, a food intolerance testing company, says that bad reactions to certain ingredients usually manifest as bloating, diarrhea, or constipation.

However, intolerances can also cause fatigue, anxiety, skin problems and migraine.

She explains: & # 39; When food particles enter the bloodstream, the immune system can sometimes identify these food protein particles as foreign invaders.

& # 39; Your body produces antibodies to attack this problem food, which in turn causes inflammation.

After switching to another white wine, Alex's migraine has since completely disappeared
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After switching to another white wine, Alex's migraine has since completely disappeared

After switching to another white wine, Alex's migraine has since completely disappeared

& # 39; The most common reactions caused by this inflammation are things like irritable bowel syndrome or constipation.

& # 39; But for a large number of people it can also manifest itself as headache and migraine.

& # 39; And we have seen many long-term migraine sufferers who have been able to alleviate their symptoms by identifying their "trigger" foods and changing their diet accordingly.

More than just a headache …

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According to charity The Migraine Trust, migraine is the most common and debilitating neurological disorder in the UK.

It occurs in one in seven people and is more common than diabetes, epilepsy and asthma together.

A migraine – which is thought to be a hereditary disorder – is more than just a headache.

Terrifying symptoms can also include: disturbed vision, sensitivity to light, sound and smells, nausea and vomiting.

& # 39; Preventing migraine can be problematic. It is important that patients realize how nutrition can play a role, especially for those where medicines do not eliminate the problem. & # 39;

Dr. Hart and the YorkTest Laboratories team use a blood test to identify what are known as & # 39; IgG antibodies & # 39; that are produced in response to a problem food.

She adds: & # 39; Test results for food intolerance should not be seen as a & # 39; diagnosis & # 39; but just as a & # 39; Roadmap for food & # 39 ;, which gives you an accurate guide to your optimal diet.

& # 39; It overrides the guesswork about what works for and against your body.

& # 39; Research has shown that when people with migraine follow tailor-made diets to eliminate trigger food, their symptoms improve significantly.

& # 39; Migraine trigger food is not & # 39; one size fits all & # 39; situation. Each person must identify his own specific combination of triggers.

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& # 39; You should always look for a program that includes nutritional support, including personalized guidelines for replacing eliminated food with nutritious alternatives.

& # 39; This is especially important for children. & # 39;

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