CHRISTOPHER STEVENS: The eternally boyish professor Brian is truly a wonder of the solar system

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Brian Cox’s Adventures in Space and Time

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The Queen Mother: War And Widowhood

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Scientists have several theories to explain that Professor Brian Cox hasn’t aged a day since his first major astronomy series, Wonders Of The Solar System, a decade ago.

One is that when he’s not on camera, the BBC stores him in a liquid nitrogen capsule, similar to the transport capsules aboard that spaceship in Alien.

For months he was kept frozen in a state of suspended animation. That single stripe of gray in his Beatles cut is really a strand of ice.

Other theoretical physicists say his timeless appearance has something to do with Einstein’s theory of relativity, E = MC2. . . where E is Eternal Youth, M is Moisturizer and C2 is a really good hair conditioner.

Scientists have several theories to explain that Professor Brian Cox hasn't aged a day since his first major astronomy series, Wonders Of The Solar System, a decade ago.

Scientists have several theories to explain that Professor Brian Cox hasn’t aged a day since his first major astronomy series, Wonders Of The Solar System, a decade ago.

It was clear how little the professor has changed when he reiterated some of his favorite moments from his science pop shows in Brian Cox’s Adventures In Space And Time (BBC2).

He was alone in a private cinema reliving his greatest close-ups, such as Gloria Swanson in Sunset Boulevard. It’s strange to think that when Miss Swanson played Norma Desmond, the time-ravaged movie queen, she was only 50 years old. Prof Brian is 53.

“I think our knowledge has grown enormously since we created those programs,” he mused. If so, we haven’t learned much about it. For example, there was little about the recent discoveries by Nasa’s Mars rovers.

But there was plenty of opportunity to enjoy Prof Brian at his boyish best. In the Atlas Mountains of Morocco, under a spectacular starry landscape, he picked up a charred stick from the fire and began to scribble in the dust, explaining why planets seem to zigzag across the sky.

Other theoretical physicists say his timeless appearance has something to do with Einstein's theory of relativity, E = MC2.  .  .  where E is Eternal Youth, M is Moisturizer and C2 is a really good hair conditioner

Other theoretical physicists say his timeless appearance has something to do with Einstein’s theory of relativity, E = MC2. . . where E is Eternal Youth, M is Moisturizer and C2 is a really good hair conditioner

In an American bar, he floated, weightless with excitement at the meeting of one of his heroes – Charlie Duke, the youngest astronaut to walk on the moon.

How was it possible, he asked Charlie, that when computers were practical clockwork, the Americans could organize a series of lunar missions? Charlie grinned. “400,000 people and an unlimited budget, you can do a lot.”

The episode ended with extraordinary images beamed back from Pluto. Parts of the surface are as smooth as an ice rink, Prof. Brian explained, because of the subterranean ocean of water heated by radioactive elements.

Who would think there is a heated pool five billion miles from the sun? I wonder if it is on the green travel list. . .

Prof Brian is also older than the Queen Mother was when her husband George VI died and her daughter ascended the throne. In 1952 she was only 51.

Photos from that era, on The Queen Mother: War And Widowhood (C5), made her look much older – although it may be hard to picture her as anything other than the lovable centenarian she became.

In fact, as this revealing portrait showed, she was a glamorous figure in the 1930s – dressed like a royal fairytale in white by designer Norman Hartnell, and photographed by Cecil Beaton with echoes of Greta Garbo.

This three-part series proves to rise above the usual royal documentaries. It’s history, not hagiography.

It’s also an opportunity to see Lady Colin Campbell in an evil hateful form, with so much sour aside that she sometimes takes over the show.

“The Queen Mother undermined the relationship between Charles and his parents,” she declared. “She would always encourage him in his hypersensitivity.”

And if Princess Margaret was in a noose, added Lady C, she would taunt her mother for not being “ born a royal and never going to be. ” Au.

Disciplinary of the Week: Doris, the head of the Langham hotel in London, fondly remembered her first boss of Britain’s most luxurious hotels (C4). “He knew when to spank me and when to hit me,” she sighed. Talk to HR, honey.

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