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CHRISTOPHER STEVENS reviews last night TV: Ignorance is bliss in the world of ‘yoof’ YouTubers

CHRISTOPHER STEVENS TV reviews from last night: aunt finds ignorance bliss in the world of ‘yoof’ YouTubers

My taxi driver in Bristol gave me a sideways glance last week, as if I was crazy when I asked what TV shows he liked. He didn’t have a television, he said. He had never had a television before, and he didn’t know anyone his age who did.

“My parents watch TV,” he admitted. “It’s for old people, innit, like you. No offense. “

None taken. An Ofcom report last October revealed that more than half of young Britons aged 16-24 in the previous week did not watch a single minute of a BBC program – neither on live TV nor on overtaking via iPlayer .

The youth in the Uber taxi admitted that he sometimes watched films: ‘My uncle, he has Netflix, anyway. And I know his password. “But most of his screen time, he said, was devoted to YouTube.

Eight-year-old Ryan Kaji (photo) from Texas judges toys: 24.2 million people have signed up to view his daily conversations

Eight-year-old Ryan Kaji (photo) from Texas judges toys: 24.2 million people have signed up to view his daily conversations

Many do-it-yourself broadcasters on YouTube, the free video channel from Google, attract audiences that the Beeb has not dreamed of for decades. For example, eight-year-old Ryan Kaji from Texas judges toys: 24.2 million people have signed up for his daily conversations.

Compare that with the figures for BBC1’s biggest hit in years, the Christmas edition of Gavin And Stacey, who brought aunt into the picture with 17.1 million – more than seven million fewer viewers.

How can the Corporation compete? By hiring YouTube stars and viewers to present a show, perhaps. Four of them, all at the elusive age of 16-25, were sent to Los Angeles to find out more about the cosmetics industry in Beauty Laid Bare (BBC1).

All four were stilts, clumsy personalities, reciting their rules as if they were reading them from the label on a box of makeup.

BBC1's biggest hit in years, the Christmas edition of Gavin And Stacey, who brought aunt into ecstasy by settling 17.1 million euros

BBC1's biggest hit in years, the Christmas edition of Gavin And Stacey, who brought aunt into ecstasy by settling 17.1 million euros

BBC1’s biggest hit in years, the Christmas edition of Gavin And Stacey, who brought aunt into ecstasy by settling 17.1 million euros

The links between segments, with pretending conversations in the back of a limousine, were unbearable. But these young people did not pretend to be polished artists. Slick patter went out with Radio 1 DJs.

The foursome was sent to a cosmetics company called ColourPop, whose factory released cheap lipsticks in neon plastic shades for the teenage market. They had a number of pre-written questions: one asked if staff on the production line received a minimum wage.

A floating supervisor stated that this question made the company “uncomfortable.” Another amateur presenter wondered if the glitters in their lipstick were biodegradable. “Maybe don’t answer this!” cried the exec.

Afterwards, 25-year-old Casey explained that it was probably better if we didn’t know the facts. “We all eat food – if we knew exactly where our food came from and what was in it, we wouldn’t eat anything. Sometimes ignorance is bliss. “If that’s true, Casey was blessed.

Four Youtubers, all in the elusive age of 16-25, were sent to Los Angeles to learn about the cosmetics industry in Beauty Laid Bare (BBC1)

Four Youtubers, all in the elusive age of 16-25, were sent to Los Angeles to learn about the cosmetics industry in Beauty Laid Bare (BBC1)

Four Youtubers, all in the elusive age of 16-25, were sent to Los Angeles to learn about the cosmetics industry in Beauty Laid Bare (BBC1)

The Ardern family behind the counter in the supermarket on Back In Time For The Corner Shop (BBC2) was much more natural for the camera. Mama Jo, in particular, is a star, with her sleeves rolled up when she churns ice into a barrel or uses a hammer and chisel to split a block of ice, like the shopkeepers of Sheffield did 100 years ago.

As always, this series is peppered with funny facts. Who could have guessed that in the era before the fridge the ice of Great Britain was being transferred from Norwegian lakes?

Or that a craze flooded the country for one-armed bandits in the 1930s? A local, 88-year-old Reg, was old enough to remember that. . . and the bomb that fell into his family’s back yard during the Blitz. A miracle did not stop it.

You will not meet much like Reg on YouTube.

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