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Members of a group called the dear holy knights of the Ku Klux Klan burn a cross in the suburbs of Madison, Indiana, on January 26, 2019. On Monday, Christian leaders distanced themselves from Christian nationalism and said it was an excuse to cover white supremacy off

Christian leaders, including Prince Harry and Meghan Markle & # 39; s marital minister, warn against the rise of & # 39; Christian nationalism & # 39; and say it offers a cover for white supremacy

  • Seventeen church leaders, including the pastor who presided over the marriage of Prince Harry and Meghan Markle, formed the group
  • They issued a statement on Monday denouncing Christian nationalism
  • They said it was used as a cover by white supremacist groups and as an excuse for violence
  • They called on other Christians to distance themselves from it
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A group of Christians have struck the rise of & # 39; Christian Nationalism & # 39; which they say is used as a cover for white supremacy.

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In a statement on Monday, 17 leaders from churches and organizations across the country joined forces to form Christians against Christian nationalism.

They issued a statement on a newly formed website in which they denounced white supremacy and distanced themselves.

Members of a group called the dear holy knights of the Ku Klux Klan burn a cross in the suburbs of Madison, Indiana, on January 26, 2019. On Monday, Christian leaders distanced themselves from Christian nationalism and said it was an excuse to cover white supremacy off

Members of a group called the dear holy knights of the Ku Klux Klan burn a cross in the suburbs of Madison, Indiana, on January 26, 2019. On Monday, Christian leaders distanced themselves from Christian nationalism and said it was an excuse to cover white supremacy off

& # 39; Christian Nationalism wants to merge Christian and American identities and disrupt both the Christian faith and American constitutional democracy.

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Christian nationalism demands that Christianity be favored by the state and implies that in order to be a good American, one must be a Christian.

& # 39; It often overlaps with and provides coverage for white supremacy and racial submission.

& # 39; We reject this harmful political ideology and invite our Christian brothers and sisters to join us in countering this threat to our faith and our nation & # 39 ;, said the statement.

The post called on other Christians to join their cause and fight the rise of Christian nationalism and said: “Whether we worship in a church, mosque, synagogue, or temple, America has no second-rate faith.

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Rev. Michael Curry, who presided over the marriage of Prince Harry and Meghan Markle, was one of those who signed the statement

The group issued this statement on Monday in which they denounced Christian nationalism

The group issued this statement on Monday in which they denounced Christian nationalism

The group issued this statement on Monday in which they denounced Christian nationalism

& # 39; All are equal according to the US constitution.

& # 39; As Christians, we must speak with one voice and condemn Christian nationalism as a distortion of the gospel of Jesus and a threat to American democracy. & # 39;

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In recent years, there has been a peak in the number of white supremacist meetings across the country.

For many, marchers wear crosses or religious paraphernalia.

The cross is also a favorite symbol of the Ku Klux Klan.

Among those who joined the group was Rev. Michael B. Curry, the pastor who presided over the wedding of Prince Harry and Meghan Markle in May last year.

He blinded a global audience with his energetic sermon about love and equality.

Protesters at the Unite the Right Rally in Charlottesville, Virginia, in 2017
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Protesters at the Unite the Right Rally in Charlottesville, Virginia, in 2017

Protesters at the Unite the Right Rally in Charlottesville, Virginia, in 2017

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