Christian Eriksen ‘will return to Inter Milan next week for medical check-up’ after cardiac arrest

Christian Eriksen ‘will return to Inter Milan next week for a medical check-up’ after a cardiac arrest at Euro 2020… with the club ‘trying to determine the cause of his collapse before deciding whether he can return to football’

  • Christian Eriksen will reportedly have medical checkups at Inter Milan next week
  • The midfielder suffered a cardiac arrest during the opening match of the European Championship of Denmark
  • The Italian club wants to investigate what caused him to collapse last month
  • They will then decide whether it is possible for him to return to football

Christian Eriksen will reportedly return to Inter Milan next week for medical checkups, nearly two months after suffering cardiac arrest at Euro 2020.

The midfielder collapsed during Denmark’s opening game against Finland and had to be urgently resuscitated by field medics who were able to resuscitate him.

The 29-year-old is recovering in Copenhagen after being released from hospital last month, but Sky Italy report that he will return to Inter’s training base next week.

According to the report, Eriksen will undergo new and accurate heart checks to determine the cause of his cardiac arrest.

After the medical exams, they will decide on their next steps and the possibility of him returning to football.

After his cardiac arrest, Eriksen had an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) placed in his chest to regulate any further disturbances in his heart rate.

An ICD is a device connected to the heart by wires that sends an electrical pulse to correct irregular rhythms.

Christian Eriksen will reportedly return to Inter Milan next week for medical checkups

The midfielder suffered a cardiac arrest in June during Denmark's match at Euro 2020 with Finland

The midfielder suffered a cardiac arrest in June during Denmark’s match at Euro 2020 with Finland

Eriksen was released from the hospital on June 18 after six days of hospitalization. After Eriksen’s discharge from hospital, Danish team doctor Morten Boesen said: ‘This device is needed after a heart attack due to arrhythmias.

“Christian has accepted the solution and the plan has been confirmed by specialists at home and abroad who are all recommending the same treatment.”

The day after Eriksen’s collapse, Boesen said the midfielder was “gone” before being brought back to life.

‘He was gone,’ said Boesen. “We did CPR, it was cardiac arrest. How close were we? I do not know. We got it back after one defib, so that’s pretty quick. We have no explanation as to why it happened.”

The Italian club wants to find out the cause of his cardiac arrest before deciding whether he can play football again

The Italian club wants to find out the cause of his cardiac arrest before deciding whether he can play football again

Earlier this month, a leading science expert from the Italian Football Association insisted that Eriksen would not be able to play for Inter again unless his defibrillator was removed.

Italy has banned players from participating in matches if they have significant heart defects, both at the amateur and professional levels.

Francesco Braconaro, a member of the Italian Football Association’s technical scientific committee, said: Radio Kiss Kiss: ‘Christian Eriksen cannot be given complete freedom to play in Italy.

“If the player has the defibrillator removed and thereby confirms that the pathology can be corrected, he can return to play for Inter.”

On the night of Eriksen’s collapse, leading NHS cardiologist Dr. Scott Murray said Eriksen would likely not be able to play for Inter again due to Italy’s strict rules on allowing people with heart problems to participate in sports activities.

Eriksen now has an implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) to monitor his heart rhythm

Eriksen now has an implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) to monitor his heart rhythm

dr. Murray told MailOnline: ‘It’s probably (the end of his career) for him. The Italians stop exercising if it is found that they have a significant heart defect, that is the law.

“They’ve been doing that for a long time, over 20 years, and they’ve reduced the death rate from cardiac arrest in sports from over 3 percent to less than one percent.”

“He (Eriksen) comes from an Italian club, so he must have had all the tests before he started (playing for Inter). The Italians are the best at screening for heart disease in competitive athletes.

“Italy has the largest pre-participation screening in the world trying to reduce the number of events, but he still has an event on the pitch. So even if you screen, it can still happen.

The 29-year-old is recovering in Copenhagen after being released from hospital

The 29-year-old is recovering in Copenhagen after being released from hospital

Leading NHS cardiologist Dr.  Scott Murray revealed Eriksen is unlikely to play football again

Leading NHS cardiologist Dr. Scott Murray revealed Eriksen is unlikely to play football again

“It’s going to be hard for him to take him out. He’s still going to be that 0.01 percent of the people that something will happen to.”

The midfielder has played 60 times for Inter Milan since joining the club from Tottenham Hotspur 18 months ago. The 29-year-old helped the Italian side to their first Serie A title in 11 years last season.

During his time in England, Eriksen played for Spurs over 300 times in a six-and-a-half-year period in North London.

Professor Sanjay Sharma, who put the former Tottenham midfielder through a series of tests annually between 2013 and 2020, said Eriksen had no known history of heart problems, but no test was ‘foolproof’.

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