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Chris van Tulleken watches doctors STOP the heart of his identical twin brother Xand

TV doctor Chris van Tulleken burst into tears when he watched doctors plug the heart of his identical twin brother Xand in an emotional BBC documentary that aired last night.

Cameras followed as the brothers, 41, returned to primary care during the pandemic, with Xand volunteering to work in a coronavirus-ravaged care home and Chris for the first time in ten years on the ward at University College Hospital.

But before they started filming Surviving the Virus: My Brother And Me in late March, Xand fell ill: it was classic coronavirus, fever, a coughing fit, and a temporary loss of smell.

He was isolated at home for two weeks, but continued to experience strange symptoms, including shortness of breath and palpitations. Three weeks later things got serious. The palpitations got worse, leaving him feeling nauseous, exhausted and scared.

In the early hours of April 21, Xand traveled to University College Hospital in London, where Chris worked in a Covid-19 ward. Cameras rolled when the brothers were told that the only way to get Xand’s heart – which was beating three times as early as the normal resting heart rate for a man his age – back to its normal rhythm was by jerking it with a powerful electric current.

TV doctor Chris van Tulleken burst into tears when he watched doctors plug the heart of his identical twin brother Xand in an emotional BBC documentary that aired last night.

TV doctor Chris van Tulleken burst into tears when he watched doctors plug the heart of his identical twin brother Xand in an emotional BBC documentary that aired last night.

Viewers watched Chris watch, helplessly, as his twin was put to sleep before his heart stopped. They talked about how emotional the moment was on Twitter (pictured)

Viewers watched Chris watch, helplessly, as his twin was put to sleep before his heart stopped. They talked about how emotional the moment was on Twitter (pictured)

Viewers watched Chris watch, helplessly, as his twin was put to sleep before his heart stopped. They talked about how emotional the moment was on Twitter (pictured)

It is believed to work by ‘rebooting’ the heart so that it stops and then starts beating again, hopefully at a healthy rhythm.

Viewers watched Chris watch, helplessly, as his twin was put to sleep before his heart stopped. “There’s no one I’m closer to,” Chris said, explaining his relationship with his twin.

The concern on his face was evident, and he reached out to touch his brother’s ankle in a small gesture of comfort, keeping his eyes on the heart monitor showing that it had successfully stopped.

After a few tense moments, the heart got the shock and started to beat again.

Viewers watched as Chris helplessly watched as his twin brother was put to sleep (pictured) before his heart stopped. “There’s no one I’m closer to,” Chris said, explaining their bond

The concern on his face was evident as he watched his brother put to sleep in the hospital

The concern on his face was evident as he watched his brother put to sleep in the hospital

The concern on his face was evident as he watched his brother put to sleep in the hospital

In a small gesture of comfort, Chris reached down to squeeze Xand's ankle while he slept

In a small gesture of comfort, Chris reached down to squeeze Xand's ankle while he slept

In a small gesture of comfort, Chris reached down to squeeze Xand’s ankle while he slept

After a few tense moments the heart got the shock and started to beat again, see picture

After a few tense moments the heart got the shock and started to beat again, see picture

After a few tense moments the heart got the shock and started to beat again, see picture

Chris could not contain his emotions and was startled, his eyes blinked furiously above his mask.

One viewer touched by the scene tweeted, ‘So incredible from @DoctorChrisVT and @xandvt to share their story. Terrifying to watch Chris take a look at his double flatline and wait for his heart to #SurvivingTheVirus reboot. ‘

Another wrote: ‘@xandvt just watching the very powerful #survivingthevirus & watching very emotionally reboot your heart.’

After a few days at home, Xand was able to continue filming – cameras followed him as he helped out in a retirement home. But permanent damage appears to have occurred.

Cameras followed as the brothers, 41, returned to frontline services during the pandemic, with Xand (left) volunteering to work in a care home ravaged by the coronavirus and Chris (right) in the ward for the first time in ten years at University College Hospital.

Cameras followed as the brothers, 41, returned to frontline services during the pandemic, with Xand (left) volunteering to work in a care home ravaged by the coronavirus and Chris (right) in the ward for the first time in ten years at University College Hospital.

Cameras followed as the brothers, 41, returned to frontline services during the pandemic, with Xand (left) volunteering to work in a care home ravaged by the coronavirus and Chris (right) in the ward for the first time in ten years at University College Hospital.

On Sunday in the Mail, Chris wrote that since the cameras stopped rolling in early May, Xand has had another episode of extreme heart palpitations that landed him in the hospital. The doctors performed the same shock treatment to fix the problem, and he was fired that same day.

But it did not completely solve the problem. Subsequent tests have led to a troubling diagnosis – the common heart condition atrial fibrillation, which usually affects people over 60. He is currently taking medications to stabilize the heart rate, but at some point in the future, he may need heart surgery to repair the damaged destroy tissue. .

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