Chocolat author says established writers are being told to change their NAMES due to debut new obsession

An award-winning author has left his mark on the publishing world and claims that established writers are told to change their names because of a current & # 39; obsession & # 39; with debut novels.

Yorkshire-born Joanne Harris, who released the novel Chocolat in 1999, a film starring Johnny Depp and Judi Dench, said that a debut novel is considered more interesting & # 39; and also & # 39; disproportionate attention & # 39; when it comes to literary prizes.

She wrote further twitter that fake debits are now & # 39 ;, adding that there is a & # 39; growing lack of appetite of publishers for the traditional, long-term, nurturing relationships they once had with their author & # 39 ;.

Joanne pointed out that there are a number of recent cases in which publishers adopt authors who have previously been published elsewhere and present them as debut novels.

Author Joanne Harris wrote on Twitter that fake authors debut & # 39; now one thing & # 39; are in a series of tweets

Author Joanne Harris wrote on Twitter that fake authors debut & # 39; now one thing & # 39; are in a series of tweets

Joanne pointed out that there are a number of recent cases where publishers adopt authors who have previously been published elsewhere and present them as debut novels because they are & # 39; more interesting & # 39; to be

Joanne pointed out that there are a number of recent cases where publishers adopt authors who have previously been published elsewhere and present them as debut novels because they are & # 39; more interesting & # 39; to be

Joanne pointed out that there are a number of recent cases where publishers adopt authors who have previously been published elsewhere and present them as debut novels because they are & # 39; more interesting & # 39; to be

In 2013, Harry Potter author JK Rowling wrote under the pseudonym Robert Galbraith for her new crime novel The Cuckoo & # 39; s Calling.

In her messages, which she awarded the hashtag #TenThingsOverDebuts, Joanne explained that she & # 39; underlying concerns & # 39; is obsessed about how publishing is currently & # 39; & # 39; seems to be with debuts.

& # 39; Of course it's great if publishers give a chance to unknown authors, especially if they have different voices. But this is not always the case, & she tweeted.

& # 39; There are indications that more and more experienced authors (mostly women) are being advised to write under a different name so that their publisher can present them as debut authors.

Joanne, who received an MBE in 2013 on the Honors list of the Queen's birthday,

Joanne, who received an MBE in 2013 on the Honors list of the Queen's birthday,

Joanne, who received an MBE in 2013 on the Honors list of the Queen's birthday,

The author said that most authors who are encouraged to write under a different name are female

The author said that most authors who are encouraged to write under a different name are female

The author said that most authors who are encouraged to write under a different name are female

& # 39; And there are a number of recent cases where publishers adopt authors previously published elsewhere and present them as debut novels. & # 39;

When Joanne listed her proposed reasons, Joanne suggested that a debut novel & # 39; more interesting & # 39; is found, especially for the marketing department.

She said people love a & # 39; rags-to-riches & # 39; story, and therefore she believes that there is & # 39; so many cases of debut novels appear that seem to pop up out of the blue & # 39 ;, adding: & # 39; Spoiler: they not not. & # 39;

Joanne argued that new authors are also more surprised when it comes to literary prizes, while there are & # 39; many specific prizes for first novels & # 39; but publishers want them to get new general prizes.

In 2013, Harry Potter author JK Rowling wrote under the pseudonym Robert Galbraith for her new crime novel The Cuckoo & # 39; s Calling

In 2013, Harry Potter author JK Rowling wrote under the pseudonym Robert Galbraith for her new crime novel The Cuckoo & # 39; s Calling

She admitted that writing with an alternative name is a & # 39; liberating experience & # 39; and said she had hoped that her true identity would remain longer than it did

She admitted that writing with an alternative name is a & # 39; liberating experience & # 39; and said she had hoped that her true identity would remain longer than it did

In 2013, Harry Potter author JK Rowling wrote under the pseudonym Robert Galbraith for her new crime novel The Cuckoo & # 39; s Calling

She suggested that money also plays a role with publishers who prefer to present new talent.

Joanne, who received an MBE on Queen's Day Honors list in 2013, wrote: & # 39; In a company where promotional budgets and print runs are often based on an author's previous sales, it is sometimes easier and more tempting to Large budget for a debut than for an established author. & # 39;

This concludes them, causing problems for both & # 39; mid-list authors who are being overlooked by their publishers in favor of new authors without a track record & # 39; like the new authors themselves, who & # 39; get a lot of attention for their first book, and not the second & # 39; at all.

Joanne suggested that money also plays a role in publishers who prefer to present new talent

Joanne suggested that money also plays a role in publishers who prefer to present new talent

Joanne wrote the novel Chocolat 1999, which was later filmed with Johnny Depp, Juliette Binoche and Judi Dench.

Joanne wrote the novel Chocolat 1999, which was later filmed with Johnny Depp, Juliette Binoche and Judi Dench.

Joanne, pictured on the left, wrote a novel Chocolat in 1999, pictured on the right, later filmed with Johnny Depp, Juliette Binoche and Judi Dench.

Joanna concluded that the trend amounts to a & # 39; growing lack of appetite from publishers for the traditional, long-term, nurturing relationships they once had with their authors & # 39;

Joanna concluded that the trend amounts to a & # 39; growing lack of appetite from publishers for the traditional, long-term, nurturing relationships they once had with their authors & # 39;

Joanna concluded that the trend amounts to a & # 39; growing lack of appetite from publishers for the traditional, long-term, nurturing relationships they once had with their authors & # 39;

Her tweets caused a lot of discussion about the platform. Fellow author Eve Ainsworth said: & # 39; Debuts are great and exciting, but midlist authors are too neglected. & # 39;

Jenifer Toksvig replied: & # 39; How depressing. To be honest, I have been mulching a novel for a while – never written, based on – but a) I am already a writer, so & # 39; debut & # 39; would be misleading, and b) I can totally see what this is like, so c) it just doesn't make me want to bother writing That One Novel She Wrote. & # 39;

And Jo Mason joked: & # 39; Sounds like it's the same as everything else in life right now … good deals for new customers, but not for existing customers! & # 39;

JK Rowling, 53, admitted that writing with an alternate name is a & # 39; liberating experience & # 39; and said she had hoped that her true identity would remain longer than it did.

Joanne & # 39; s tweets caused a lot of discussion about the platform. Fellow author Eve Ainsworth said: & # 39; Debuts are great and exciting, but midlist authors are too neglected & # 39;

Joanne & # 39; s tweets caused a lot of discussion about the platform. Fellow author Eve Ainsworth said: & # 39; Debuts are great and exciting, but midlist authors are too neglected & # 39;

Joanne & # 39; s tweets caused a lot of discussion about the platform. Fellow author Eve Ainsworth said: & # 39; Debuts are great and exciting, but midlist authors are too neglected & # 39;

She said: & # 39; It was great to publish without hype or expectation and pure pleasure in getting feedback under a different name. & # 39;

The pseudonym tactic is not just a recent phenomenon. Crime writer Agatha Christie wrote 66 detective novels under her own name, but also wrote six romance novels under the name Mary Westmacott.

It is not only established female writers who have used it. At the start of his career, the American author Stephen King used the pseudonym Richard Bachman for several of his books because his publishers were concerned that he was writing too much and risked saturating his own market.

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