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Chinese state newspaper warns ‘narcissistic’ and ‘bullying’ Britain to stay out of Hong Kong affairs

A Chinese state-backed newspaper has attacked Britain, saying it should no longer intervene in Hong Kong cases because “the city has nothing to do with the UK.”

Beijing’s propaganda channel The Global Times accused London of being ‘narcissistic’ in its views of the former British colony.

It claimed that Hong Kong “suffered from British harassment” under British rule and now enjoys “a high degree of autonomy” from the Communist Party.

Beijing's propaganda channel The Global Times has urged the UK to stop intervening in Hong Kong affairs and focus on addressing the COVID-19 crisis. Pictured, riot police are saving a protester during a demonstration against a controversial anthem bill in Hong Kong today

Beijing’s propaganda channel The Global Times has urged the UK to stop intervening in Hong Kong affairs and focus on addressing the COVID-19 crisis. Pictured, riot police are saving a protester during a demonstration against a controversial anthem bill in Hong Kong today

Street protests against the government have restarted in Hong Kong after China proposed a new national security law for the semi-autonomous city to curb the turmoil. Pictured, riot police are vigilant on Wednesday during a protest near the Central Government Complex

Street protests against the government have restarted in Hong Kong after China proposed a new national security law for the semi-autonomous city to curb the turmoil. Pictured, riot police are vigilant on Wednesday during a protest near the Central Government Complex

Street protests against the government have restarted in Hong Kong after China proposed a new national security law for the semi-autonomous city to curb the turmoil. Pictured, riot police are vigilant on Wednesday during a protest near the Central Government Complex

The communist-led gossip magazine voiced the scathing criticism just before the rubber stamped Chinese parliament passed a national security bill that would significantly reduce the freedoms of Hong Kong citizens.

Meanwhile, riot police in Hong Kong today used peppercorns and arrested dozens of protesters demanding independence from the city while demonstrating against Beijing’s tightening grip.

“Hong Kong is one of the few places where Britain can narcissistically flaunt its position as a former state overlord,” the Global Times condemned.

“Under British rule, Hong Kongers could not enjoy equal citizenship and political participation, and simply suffered from British harassment,” the newspaper continued. an opinion piece published yesterday.

The author urged Britain to worry about the COVID-19 crisis rather than Hong Kong.

Chinese President Xi Jinping (left) and Prime Minister Li Keqiang (right) arrive at the opening session of the Chinese People’s Political Consultative Conference. Prime Minister Li criticized the so-called “outside forces” and warned them not to interfere in Hong Kong affairs

Hong Kong CEO Carrie Lam (pictured in Beijing on May 22) expressed support for the bill, adding that 'preserving national sovereignty, security and development interests are the constitutional requirements of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region'

Hong Kong CEO Carrie Lam (pictured in Beijing on May 22) expressed support for the bill, adding that 'preserving national sovereignty, security and development interests are the constitutional requirements of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region'

Hong Kong CEO Carrie Lam (pictured in Beijing on May 22) expressed support for the bill, adding that ‘preserving national sovereignty, security and development interests are the constitutional requirements of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region’

Beijing has bypassed the Hong Kong parliament to propose and revise controversial legislation.

National Security Law, which aims to stem the pro-democracy movement of Hong Kong, is expected to prohibit people from inciting and participating in demonstrations and activities that Beijing considers “subversive.”

The proposed decree would block secession, foreign interference, terrorism, and any inflammatory activity aimed at overthrowing the central government and any outside interference in the former British colony, the South China Morning Post newspaper said, citing unnamed sources.

Chinese troops have said they are ready to “destroy” protests against the law.

Chen Daoxiang, Beijing's army chief in Hong Kong, said he and his soldiers were willing to destroy pro-democracy rallies. Pictured, members of the People's Liberation Army in Hong Kong perform exercises during an open day demonstration at the Shek Kong Barracks on June 30, 2018

Chen Daoxiang, Beijing's army chief in Hong Kong, said he and his soldiers were willing to destroy pro-democracy rallies. Pictured, members of the People's Liberation Army in Hong Kong perform exercises during an open day demonstration at the Shek Kong Barracks on June 30, 2018

Chen Daoxiang, Beijing’s army chief in Hong Kong, said he and his soldiers were willing to destroy pro-democracy rallies. Pictured, members of the People’s Liberation Army perform exercises during a demonstration at the Shek Kong Barracks on June 30, 2018 in Hong Kong

The National Security Act proposed by Beijing has revived anti-government calls in the financial hub. Depicted pro-democracy supporters take part in a demonstration on May 24 in Hong Kong

The National Security Act proposed by Beijing has revived anti-government calls in the financial hub. Depicted pro-democracy supporters take part in a demonstration on May 24 in Hong Kong

The National Security Act proposed by Beijing has revived anti-government calls in the financial hub. Depicted pro-democracy supporters take part in a demonstration on May 24 in Hong Kong

The Chinese parliament is expected to pass the bill at a major political conference this week amid global fears that Beijing may take full control of the city. In the photo, a riot police from Hong Kong attack a demonstrator at an anti-government meeting on May 24

The Chinese parliament is expected to pass the bill at a major political conference this week amid global fears that Beijing may take full control of the city. In the photo, a riot police from Hong Kong attack a demonstrator at an anti-government meeting on May 24

The Chinese parliament is expected to pass the bill at a major political conference this week amid global fears that Beijing may take full control of the city. In the photo, a riot police from Hong Kong attack a demonstrator at an anti-government meeting on May 24

China says the law was necessary because Hong Kong has become a “national security risk” after years of demonstrations against Beijing.

But the movement caused immediate warnings that the law would be used to prosecute protesters, and China could bring charges of subversion and terrorism against them.

Critics say the act would lead to the widespread use of the secret police, arbitrary detention, surveillance and even internet control in the island territory.

China says the law was necessary because Hong Kong has become a “national security risk” after years of demonstrations against Beijing. Pictured, police are guarding an exit from an MTR station near the Legislative Council in Hong Kong on May 27 ahead of a national anthem law debate

The Beijing act immediately sparked warnings that the law would be used to prosecute protesters, and China could bring charges of subversion and terrorism against them. In the photo, riot police are detaining a group of people during a protest in Hong Kong's Causeway Bay district

The Beijing act immediately sparked warnings that the law would be used to prosecute protesters, and China could bring charges of subversion and terrorism against them. In the photo, riot police are detaining a group of people during a protest in Hong Kong's Causeway Bay district

The Beijing act immediately sparked warnings that the law would be used to prosecute protesters, and China could bring charges of subversion and terrorism against them. In the photo, riot police are detaining a group of people during a protest in Hong Kong’s Causeway Bay district

Lord Chris Patten, the last British governor of Hong Kong, has called on world leaders to stand up to Beijing and help Hong Kong fight for his freedom in a column on the Financial times.

Lord Patten has also described the new law as “a frontal attack” on the relative freedoms granted to the semi-autonomous city.

He said Britain should take action against the “shameful violation” of China’s international treaty obligations, calling the Communist Party “a very mean, brutal, bullying and lying regime.”

The Global Times lashed out at Lord Patten about his comments, calling him “a representative of hypocritical colonialism in the UK.”

“Patten still lives in the colonial era,” he said. “Since Hong Kong returned to China in 1997, the city has had nothing to do with the UK.”

Lord Chris Patten, the last British governor of Hong Kong, has called on world leaders to stand up to Beijing and help Hong Kong fight for his freedom. Lord Patten has also described the new law as “a frontal attack” on the relative freedoms granted to the semi-autonomous city

Prince Charles and the last British governor of Hong Kong, Chris Patten (left), raise their glasses for the loyal toast prior to the colony's transfer to China after 154 years of British rule

Prince Charles and the last British Governor of Hong Kong, Chris Patten (left), raise their glasses for the loyal toast prior to the colony's transfer to China after 154 years of British rule

Prince Charles and the last British Governor of Hong Kong, Chris Patten (left), raise their glasses for the loyal toast prior to the colony’s transfer to China after 154 years of British rule

Billed as China’s “most combative tabloid,” the Global Times has been at the forefront of defending Beijing’s actions, and the West complaining about its criticism of the community party.

The column then slammed the UK by accusing it of imposing “a highly centralized political system” on Hong Kong after “occupying” the city in 1841.

It then bragged about how “Hong Kong enjoys a high degree of autonomy, and Hong Kong people also enjoy far more political rights” after Britain transferred it to China.

“The UK’s intervention in Hong Kong affairs will be nothing but oral complaints, trying to demonstrate its presence. It can never really affect things in Hong Kong, ‘the newspaper concluded.

Thousands protest against Hong Kong folk song bill

Police have fired peppercorns and arrested dozens of protesters in Hong Kong while trying to dissuade politicians from debating a controversial anthem bill.

Agents clashed with activists in the city-state’s central business district on Wednesday after plans to block parliament were abandoned when the area was overrun with armed officers.

Demonstrations have been going on for days in Hong Kong as lawmakers try to push the law, making it a crime to mock the Chinese national anthem.

Police clash with pro-democracy activists on the streets of Hong Kong as they try to prevent parliament from discussing a bill that would make it illegal to mock the Chinese national anthem

Police clash with pro-democracy activists on the streets of Hong Kong as they try to prevent parliament from discussing a bill that would make it illegal to mock the Chinese national anthem

Police clash with pro-democracy activists on the streets of Hong Kong as they try to prevent parliament from discussing a bill that would make it illegal to mock the Chinese national anthem

Agents fired peppercorns at activists in the city's central business district after a planned protest outside parliament was suppressed by a massive police presence

Agents fired peppercorns at activists in the city's central business district after a planned protest outside parliament was suppressed by a massive police presence

Agents fired peppercorns at activists in the city’s central business district after a planned protest outside parliament was suppressed by a massive police presence

Hong Kong police today took to the streets en masse in full riot gear, with tear gas, pepper balls, and pistols.

The latest round of protests came about last week when the Chinese government – in a surprising move – said it would develop laws to ban secession, undermining, terrorism and foreign interference in Hong Kong.

Those laws will not be debated in Hong Kong after China uses a legislative backdoor to bypass the city’s parliament, meaning they will be stamped by the National People’s Congress in Beijing instead.

The pro-democracy movement in Hong Kong has called on Downing Street to stand up to the sweeping changes in Beijing.

It also called on Britain to offer ‘shelter’ to those in the crosshairs of China, while trying to dismantle the constitutional principle of ‘one country, two systems’.

Hong Kong Legislative Council member Claudia Mo said Britain had a ‘moral obligation’ to act and warned: ‘They [China] wants Hong Kong dead. ‘

Tory Member of Parliament Bob Seely said Britain should be ready to offer massive asylum to thousands expected to flee Hong Kong.

He warned that there might be an “exodus” from the former British colony, fearing that legislation will target pro-democracy activists.

Hong Kong Legislative Council member Claudia Mo said Britain had a 'moral obligation' to act and warned: 'They [China] wants Hong Kong dead. Mo is pictured talking to another pan-democratic legislator Eddie Chu for the second reading of the national anthem Bill

Hong Kong Legislative Council member Claudia Mo said Britain had a 'moral obligation' to act and warned: 'They [China] wants Hong Kong dead. Mo is pictured talking to another pan-democratic legislator Eddie Chu for the second reading of the national anthem Bill

Hong Kong Legislative Council member Claudia Mo said Britain had a ‘moral obligation’ to act and warned: ‘They [China] wants Hong Kong dead. Mo is pictured talking to another pan-democratic legislator Eddie Chu for the second reading of the national anthem Bill

Hong Kong’s pro-democracy lawmakers sharply criticized China’s move to adopt long-term efforts to introduce national security laws in the semi-autonomous area, saying it goes against the framework of “one country, two systems that promises urban freedoms

Hong Kong’s opposition legislators held signboards that read “CCP trampling on Hong Kong’s legislature” and “Hong Kong becomes Xinjiang” while protesting in the city’s Legislative Council. The bill was submitted on the opening day of the National Legislative Session of China

Patten leads the protest in Hong Kong

Scores of British politicians have signed an international statement calling for a tougher global stance on China’s threat to pass new laws oppressing the people of Hong Kong.

Under the leadership of former Hong Kong Governor Lord Patten and former Secretary of State Sir Malcolm Rifkind, 194 parliamentarians in 23 countries have declared Hong Kong’s independent status “hanging on a thread.”

The globally coordinated statement reads: “We are writing to express serious concern about Beijing’s unilateral implementation of national security laws in Hong Kong.

“This is a comprehensive attack on the autonomy, the rule of law and the fundamental freedoms of the city. The integrity of one country, two systems is a common thread …

Sympathetic governments must unite to say that this blatant violation of the Sino-British joint statement cannot be tolerated.

Lord Patten said, “The statement shows a growing and widespread international outcry over the Chinese government’s decision to unilaterally impose national security laws in Hong Kong. The broad support encompassing all political parties and four continents reflects both the seriousness of the situation and continued unified international support for the principle of one country, two systems. ‘

Sir Malcolm told the MoS, “The people of Hong Kong need and deserve our support.”

Lord Patter said China has betrayed the semi-autonomous territory by tightening control of the city it promised could preserve the freedoms on the mainland.

“What we’re seeing is a new Chinese dictatorship,” said Chris Patten in an interview with The Times of London.

“I think the people of Hong Kong have been betrayed by China, which proves once again that you can’t trust it any further than you can throw.”

He said the British government should “make it clear that what we see is a complete destruction of the joint statement,” a legal document under which the former British colony was returned to China in 1997 under a “one country, two systems” framework.

It gives Hong Kong its own legal system and Western-style freedoms until 2047. But many fear that these will erode soon after authorities suppressed the massive pro-democracy rallies that turned the city on its head last year.

The European Union yesterday urged China to respect Hong Kong’s autonomy.

“We attach great importance to maintaining Hong Kong’s high degree of autonomy in accordance with its basic law and international obligations,” said European Council President Charles Michel, representing European governments.

During a video conference with Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe, he said that Europe and Japan “share the same ideas” about China. “We are not naive about Chinese behavior,” said Michel.

He said Europe supports the “one country, two systems” principle that governs Hong Kong’s autonomy.

Hong Kong National Security Law is expected to be discussed by the Chinese National People’s Congress and adopted on Thursday.

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