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The riot police shoot tear gas at protesters during a protest in the Sai Wan district in Hong Kong on Sunday. Hong Kong has been rocked in the last two months by protests against a bill that can extradite people from the city to stand trial on mainland China

Chinese state media have accused Western media of distorting the truth of Hong Kong protests that have left the Asian financial hub in turmoil for more than seven weeks.

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China Daily, the largest official English-language news portal in China, has today criticized & # 39; some Western and Hong Kong media & # 39; for misleading the public in their coverage of the ongoing unrest, with reference to a variety of news broadcasts.

In a post on Twitter, blocked by the authorities in China, the official newspaper said that relevant reports had also damaged the image of the Hong Kong police in a video report.

The riot police shoot tear gas at protesters during a protest in the Sai Wan district in Hong Kong on Sunday. Hong Kong has been rocked in the last two months by protests against a bill that can extradite people from the city to stand trial on mainland China

The riot police shoot tear gas at protesters during a protest in the Sai Wan district in Hong Kong on Sunday. Hong Kong has been rocked in the last two months by protests against a bill that can extradite people from the city to stand trial on mainland China

A bleeding man responds if he is taken away by police officers after being attacked today by protesters outside the Kwai Chung police station in Hong Kong. Chinese state newspaper said some Hong Kong and Western media had & # 39; demonized China & # 39; with their reports about the unrest

A bleeding man responds if he is taken away by police officers after being attacked today by protesters outside the Kwai Chung police station in Hong Kong. Chinese state newspaper said some Hong Kong and Western media had & # 39; demonized China & # 39; with their reports about the unrest

A bleeding man responds if he is taken away by police officers after being attacked today by protesters outside the Kwai Chung police station in Hong Kong. Chinese state newspaper said some Hong Kong and Western media had & # 39; demonized China & # 39; with their reports about the unrest

A demonstrator throws a tear gas bus back to the police during a demonstration on Sunday
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A demonstrator throws a tear gas bus back to the police during a demonstration on Sunday

A demonstrator throws a tear gas bus back to the police during a demonstration on Sunday

China said at a press conference that attempts by what it calls some irresponsible figures in the West to generate turbulence in Hong Kong and control China's development are failing

China said at a press conference that attempts by what it calls some irresponsible figures in the West to generate turbulence in Hong Kong and control China's development are failing

China said at a press conference that attempts by what it calls some irresponsible figures in the West to generate turbulence in Hong Kong and control China's development are failing

The report appeared after Beijing this week suggested that the United States had planned the unrest in Hong Kong.

The Chinese Foreign Ministry spokesman Hua Chunying said yesterday that recent violent protests in Hong Kong & # 39; the work of the US & # 39; goods.

She reiterated that Beijing would not allow foreign troops to interfere in the country's domestic affairs.

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Hua & # 39; s comments came after US Secretary of State Mike Pompeo said that China should do the right & # 39; when handling protests in the territory, urging all parties to avoid violence.

& # 39; I believe Mr. Pompeo ... thinks the recent violence in Hong Kong is reasonable because everyone knows this is the work of the United States & # 39 ;, said spokeswoman Hua Chunying of the Chinese Foreign Ministry Business (photo) yesterday

& # 39; I believe Mr. Pompeo ... thinks the recent violence in Hong Kong is reasonable because everyone knows this is the work of the United States & # 39 ;, said spokeswoman Hua Chunying of the Chinese Foreign Ministry Business (photo) yesterday

& # 39; I believe Mr. Pompeo … thinks the recent violence in Hong Kong is reasonable because everyone knows this is the work of the United States & # 39 ;, said spokeswoman Hua Chunying of the Chinese Foreign Ministry Business (photo) yesterday

Hua made the comments after US Secretary of State Mike Pompeo said that China & # 39; should do the right & # 39; encourages all parties in the handling of protests in Hong Kong to prevent violence

Hua made the comments after US Secretary of State Mike Pompeo said that China & # 39; should do the right & # 39; encourages all parties in the handling of protests in Hong Kong to prevent violence

Hua made the comments after US Secretary of State Mike Pompeo said that China & # 39; should do the right & # 39; encourages all parties in the handling of protests in Hong Kong to prevent violence

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Mainland Chinese media did not deal with the protests, which began in early June, until a group of demonstrators destroyed the Chinese national emblem and Beijing representative office in Hong Kong.

An expert told The Wall Street Journal that China seemed to be trying to control the story of the Hong Kong protests after news of the rally & # 39; s reached the mainland despite censorship efforts.

China Daily & # 39; s video report some media accused of & # 39; demonizing & # 39; from China.

Some news channels intentionally had & # 39; images and evidence from demonstrators involved in arson and police attacks & # 39; ignored & # 39 ;, added China Daily.

It gave some examples to show how the political crisis in the West was & misrepresented & # 39 ;.

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One of the examples shows an older woman screaming and confronting other people on the street.

One of the examples given by China Daily shows an older woman screaming and confronting other people on the street. The Chinese newspaper said the woman was trying to tell protesters & # 39; going away & # 39; and restore peace to Yuen Long. Other images show her confronting police

One of the examples given by China Daily shows an older woman screaming and confronting other people on the street. The Chinese newspaper said the woman was trying to tell protesters & # 39; going away & # 39; and restore peace to Yuen Long. Other images show her confronting police

One of the examples given by China Daily shows an older woman screaming and confronting other people on the street. The Chinese newspaper said the woman was trying to tell protesters & # 39; going away & # 39; and restore peace to Yuen Long. Other images show her confronting police

Hungry unrest took a dark turn on July 21 when gangs of men - most with white T-shirts and with bats, sticks and metal poles - went against protesters against the government

Hungry unrest took a dark turn on July 21 when gangs of men - most with white T-shirts and with bats, sticks and metal poles - went against protesters against the government

Hungry unrest took a dark turn on July 21 when gangs of men – mostly with white T-shirts and with bats, sticks and metal poles – started protesting against the government

Men in white T-shirts with poles are seen in Yuen Long on July 21 after attacking anti-extradition invoices and other commuters at the train station
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Men in white T-shirts with poles are seen in Yuen Long on July 21 after attacking anti-extradition invoices and other commuters at the train station

Men in white T-shirts with poles are seen in Yuen Long on July 21 after attacking anti-extradition invoices and other commuters at the train station

The report claimed that the clip captured the woman trying to restore peace in Yuen Long on July 27 by telling protesters to leave. A group of club-moving gangsters had stormed a train station in the area and defeated protesters and passengers a week earlier.

The Chinese newspaper then produced a report Mashable, claiming that the website with headquarters in New York – best known for its technical and digital culture – had perverted the truth behind the video.

The Mashable report said the older woman was trying to protect the young protesters from the police.

It quoted a tweet from Joshua Wong, an activist imprisoned by the Hong Kong authorities for his involvement in the 2014 pro-democracy protests, Umbrella Revolution.

A separate report from the Hong Kong TV station TVB Jade showed the same woman who yelled at the riot police and accused them of ignoring the white-clad villains who had attacked residents. The clip was not shown by China Daily.

The China Daily report also condemned Apple Daily and the BBC without naming specific articles.

Apple Daily, with offices in Hong Kong and Taiwan, was founded by 70-year-old Jimmy Lai Chee-Ying and is known for its pro-democracy attitude and color reporting.

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In a strongly worded opinion piece in Global Times, the founder of Hong Kong & # 39; s Democratic Party Martin Lee Chu-ming and media magnate Jimmy Lai Chee-Ying were criticized for their role in the city's ongoing anti-government movement and the invitation of foreign interference. Above, Jimmy Lai Chee-Ying meets US Vice President Mike Pence at the White House on July 8 this year

Martin Lee Chu-ming, 81, nicknamed & # 39; the father of democracy & # 39; in Hong Kong, is a founder of the Democratic Party and served in the Basic Legislation Committee in 1985.

Martin Lee Chu-ming, 81, nicknamed & # 39; the father of democracy & # 39; in Hong Kong, is a founder of the Democratic Party and served in the Basic Legislation Committee in 1985.

Martin Lee Chu-ming, 81, nicknamed & # 39; the father of democracy & # 39; in Hong Kong, is a founder of the Democratic Party and served in the Basic Legislation Committee in 1985.

Protesters with helmet and self-made shields seen during a confrontation with the Hong Kong police on Sunday evening. The demonstrations were triggered by a controversial bill that would have permitted extraditions to China, but has evolved into a call for broader democratic reforms

Protesters with helmet and self-made shields seen during a confrontation with the Hong Kong police on Sunday evening. The demonstrations were triggered by a controversial bill that would have permitted extraditions to China, but has evolved into a call for broader democratic reforms

Protesters with helmet and self-made shields seen during a confrontation with the Hong Kong police on Sunday evening. The demonstrations were triggered by a controversial bill that would have permitted extraditions to China, but has evolved into a call for broader democratic reforms

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Another Chinese state-run newspaper Global Times has labeled media magnate Lai as a & # 39; modern traitor & # 39; who cooperated with Western forces, including the United States, to arouse anti-government sentiment on the proposed extradition law.

At the beginning of this month, Lai met with US Vice President Mike Pence and Secretary of State Mike Pompeo in Washington about the now suspended extradition law.

Hong Kong has been rocked in the last two months by protests against a bill that can extradite people from the city to stand trial in Communist Party-controlled courts on mainland China.

The massive opposition to the bill has turned into a broader pro-democracy movement that has shed the biggest challenge to the authority of Beijing since the former British colony returned to Chinese rule in 1997.

Dozens of pro-democracy demonstrators from Hong Kong appeared in court today after being accused of riots, and laid the foundation for further unrest in a week-long crisis that turned the global financial hub upside down.

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Forty-three defendants turned up in court. All were released on bail and the vast majority were given a curfew.

A (central) woman leaves the Eastern Court after a riot. The accused consisted of a teacher, a nurse, a pilot, a hairdresser, a chef, an electrician, a construction worker and the unemployed, according to their description sheets.

A (central) woman leaves the Eastern Court after a riot. The accused consisted of a teacher, a nurse, a pilot, a hairdresser, a chef, an electrician, a construction worker and the unemployed, according to their description sheets.

A (central) woman leaves the Eastern Court after a riot. The accused consisted of a teacher, a nurse, a pilot, a hairdresser, a chef, an electrician, a construction worker and the unemployed, according to their description sheets.

Protesters sing slogans as they gather outside the Eastern Court in Hong Kong. City police said yesterday that 44 people, between the ages of 16 and 41, had been charged with riots and another with possession of assault weapons

Protesters sing slogans as they gather outside the Eastern Court in Hong Kong. City police said yesterday that 44 people, between the ages of 16 and 41, had been charged with riots and another with possession of assault weapons

Protesters sing slogans as they gather outside the Eastern Court in Hong Kong. City police said yesterday that 44 people, between the ages of 16 and 41, had been charged with riots and another with possession of assault weapons

A demonstrator is holding a placard with the text: "No rioters, only tyranny" while chanting slogans as they gather outside the Eastern Court in Hong Kong. The vast majority of the accused persons were brought to justice this morning and received bail

A demonstrator is holding a placard with the text: "No rioters, only tyranny" while chanting slogans as they gather outside the Eastern Court in Hong Kong. The vast majority of the accused persons were brought to justice this morning and received bail

A protester holds a sign with the text: & # 39; No rioters, only tyranny & # 39; while chanting slogans as they gather outside the Eastern Court in Hong Kong. The vast majority of the accused persons were brought to justice this morning and received bail

Chinese Ministry of Defense spokesman Wu Qian (photo in 2017) said at a press conference in Beijing that the ministry has been paying attention & # 39; on the situation in Hong Kong

Chinese Ministry of Defense spokesman Wu Qian (photo in 2017) said at a press conference in Beijing that the ministry has been paying attention & # 39; on the situation in Hong Kong

Chinese Ministry of Defense spokesman Wu Qian (photo in 2017) said at a press conference in Beijing that the ministry has been paying attention & # 39; on the situation in Hong Kong

The announcement last night that 44 people were charged with riots – a crime with a prison sentence of up to 10 years – immediately led to a new round of clashes between police and demonstrators.

The White House said it was a sudden & # 39; congregation & # 39; of Chinese troops on the Hong Kong border is guarding, according to reports, fearing that Beijing could increase their control over the unrest of the city, which has escalated to an unprecedented level.

A White House official, who wanted to remain anonymous, told journalists that there could be a buildup of military forces or armed police on the border between mainland China and Hong Kong, without giving further details, reported Bloomberg.

In the final confrontation, the police used pepper spray and batons against hundreds of protesters who had gathered outside a police station in solidarity with those who had just been charged.

Images broadcast live on television showed an officer aiming a gun at demonstrators throwing objects at him.

In the two preceding weekends there was an increase in the level of violence by both protesters and the police, who repeatedly fired rubber bullets and tear gas to disperse the crowd with projectiles.

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