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Zhao Zhihong, 47, known as the & # 39; smiling killer &, was sentenced to death in Inner Mongolia in 2015 for crimes committed in the northern region between 1996 and 2005. Above, Zhao depicted in a courtroom in Hohhot Intermediate Peoples & # 39; Court in February 2015
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A serial killer who killed six people and raped ten women and two girls, including a 12-year-old, was executed today, according to the Chinese court.

Zhao Zhihong, 47, known as the & # 39; smiling murderer &, was sentenced to death in Inner Mongolia in 2015 for crimes in the northern region between 1996 and 2005.

He strangled most of his victims with his hands, but killed one with telephone wire and cut another.

Zhao Zhihong, 47, known as the & # 39; smiling killer &, was sentenced to death in Inner Mongolia in 2015 for crimes committed in the northern region between 1996 and 2005. Above, Zhao depicted in a courtroom in Hohhot Intermediate Peoples & # 39; Court in February 2015

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Zhao Zhihong, 47, known as the & # 39; smiling killer &, was sentenced to death in Inner Mongolia in 2015 for crimes committed in the northern region between 1996 and 2005. Above, Zhao depicted in a courtroom in Hohhot Intermediate Peoples & # 39; Court in February 2015

Zhao was arrested in 2005 and committed a series of crimes, including the 1996 rape and the choking of a woman in the toilet of a textile factory in Hohhot, the capital of Inner Mongolia. An 18-year-old named Huugjilt (pictured above) had already been tried, convicted, convicted and executed for that murder. The teenager was acquitted posthumously after his family fought for years to prove his innocence

Zhao was arrested in 2005 and committed a series of crimes, including the 1996 rape and the choking of a woman in the toilet of a textile factory in Hohhot, the capital of Inner Mongolia. An 18-year-old named Huugjilt (pictured above) had already been tried, convicted, convicted and executed for that murder. The teenager was acquitted posthumously after his family fought for years to prove his innocence

Zhao was arrested in 2005 and committed a series of crimes, including the 1996 rape and the choking of a woman in the toilet of a textile factory in Hohhot, the capital of Inner Mongolia. An 18-year-old named Huugjilt (pictured above) had already been tried, convicted, convicted and executed for that murder. The teenager was acquitted posthumously after his family fought for years to prove his innocence

& # 39; The nature of his crimes was particularly horrible & # 39 ;, said the Supreme Court, which has the final say on executions.

Zhao had committed 17 crimes consisting of intentional manslaughter, rape, theft and larceny in multiple places in Inner Mongolia, the court said today in a statement.

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His crimes were committed with & # 39; extremely brutal means & # 39; and & # 39; caused serious social damage & # 39 ;. Zhao refused to meet his family before the execution, the court added.

Chinese journalists who met Zhao called him the & # 39; smiling killer & # 39; because of his seemingly inexplicable attitude.

Zhao had committed 17 crimes consisting of intentional murder, rape, theft and larceny in multiple places in Inner Mongolia, the court said in a statement. Above, Zhao pictured in 2015

Zhao had committed 17 crimes consisting of intentional murder, rape, theft and larceny in multiple places in Inner Mongolia, the court said in a statement. Above, Zhao pictured in 2015

Zhao had committed 17 crimes consisting of intentional murder, rape, theft and larceny in multiple places in Inner Mongolia, the court said in a statement. Above, Zhao pictured in 2015

Huugjilt was acquitted posthumously after his family fought for years to prove his innocence. In February 2016, the Chinese authorities punished 27 officials for the unlawful conviction and execution of Huugjilt, whose case was considered one of the most notorious cases of judicial injustice in the country

Huugjilt was acquitted posthumously after his family fought for years to prove his innocence. In February 2016, the Chinese authorities punished 27 officials for the unlawful conviction and execution of Huugjilt, whose case was considered one of the most notorious cases of judicial injustice in the country

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Huugjilt was acquitted posthumously after his family fought for years to prove his innocence. In February 2016, the Chinese authorities punished 27 officials for the unlawful conviction and execution of Huugjilt, whose case was considered one of the most notorious cases of judicial injustice in the country

On December 31, 2015, the Supreme People's Court of Inner Mongolia ruled that Huugjilt & # 39; s mother Shang Aiyun and father Li Sanren received approximately two million yuan (£ 238,000) as compensation for the unlawful execution of their son. Above, Shang pictured in 2015

On December 31, 2015, the Supreme People's Court of Inner Mongolia ruled that Huugjilt & # 39; s mother Shang Aiyun and father Li Sanren received approximately two million yuan (£ 238,000) as compensation for the unlawful execution of their son. Above, Shang pictured in 2015

On December 31, 2015, the Supreme People's Court of Inner Mongolia ruled that Huugjilt & # 39; s mother Shang Aiyun and father Li Sanren received approximately two million yuan (£ 238,000) as compensation for the unlawful execution of their son. Above, Shang pictured in 2015

Zhao was arrested in 2005 and committed a series of crimes, including the 1996 rape and the choking of a woman in the toilet of a textile factory in Hohhot, the capital of Inner Mongolia.

An 18-year-old named Huugjilt had already been tried, convicted, convicted and executed for that murder. The teenager was released posthumously in 2014 after his family fought for years to prove his innocence.

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In February 2016, the Chinese authorities punished 27 officials for the unlawful sentencing and execution of Huugjilt, whose case was considered one of the most notorious cases of judicial injustice in the country.

Acquittals are extremely rare in China and it is even rarer that convictions are destroyed.

The crimes of Zhao Zhihong were & # 39; extremely brutal means & # 39; and & # 39; caused serious social damage & # 39 ;. He refused to meet his family before the execution. Above, Zhao seen in April 2015

The crimes of Zhao Zhihong were & # 39; extremely brutal means & # 39; and & # 39; caused serious social damage & # 39 ;. He refused to meet his family before the execution. Above, Zhao seen in April 2015

The crimes of Zhao Zhihong were executed with & # 39; extremely brutal means & # 39; and & # 39; caused serious social damage & # 39 ;. He refused to meet his family before the execution. Above, Zhao seen in 2015

Huugjilt was sentenced to death on 10 June 1996 - despite the apparent lack of evidence - and executed on the same day. Above, Huugjilt & # 39; s destroyed parents Shang Aiyun and Li Sanren grieve their son in front of his grave in Hohhot in December 2014

Huugjilt was sentenced to death on 10 June 1996 - despite the apparent lack of evidence - and executed on the same day. Above, Huugjilt & # 39; s destroyed parents Shang Aiyun and Li Sanren grieve their son in front of his grave in Hohhot in December 2014

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Huugjilt was sentenced to death on 10 June 1996 – despite the apparent lack of evidence – and executed on the same day. Above, Huugjilt & # 39; s destroyed parents Shang Aiyun and Li Sanren grieve their son in front of his grave in Hohhot in December 2014

On December 31, 2015, the Supreme People's Court of Inner Mongolia ruled that Huugjilt & # 39; s mother Shang Aiyun and father Li Sanren received approximately two million yuan (£ 238,000) as compensation for the unlawful execution of their son. Above, Shang seen in December 2014

On December 31, 2015, the Supreme People's Court of Inner Mongolia ruled that Huugjilt & # 39; s mother Shang Aiyun and father Li Sanren received approximately two million yuan (£ 238,000) as compensation for the unlawful execution of their son. Above, Shang seen in December 2014

On December 31, 2015, the Supreme People's Court of Inner Mongolia ruled that Huugjilt & # 39; s mother Shang Aiyun and father Li Sanren received approximately two million yuan (£ 238,000) as compensation for the unlawful execution of their son. Above, Shang seen in December 2014

According to local reports, Huugjilt, who worked in a textile factory, found the corpse of a woman in a public toilet after hearing a cry for help on April 9, 1996 in 1996.

He warned the case about the police, who later arrested him on suspicion of rape and murder. Reportedly, officers tortured him on Huugjilt interrogation.

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Huugjilt was sentenced to death on 10 June 1996 – despite the apparent lack of evidence – and executed on the same day.

On December 31, 2015, the Supreme People's Court of Inner Mongolia ruled that Huugjilt & # 39; s mother Shang Aiyun and father Li Sanren received approximately two million yuan (£ 238,000) as compensation for the unlawful execution of their son.

In another turn in the case, the Supreme Court today annulled Zhao's conviction for that crime for lack of evidence, according to the CCTV of the state.

China adopted new provisions in 2010 that tightened the evidence requirements for death sentences and in 2015 reduced the number of capital crimes from 55 to 46.

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