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Chinese people explore the dark side of the moon and find three different layers

Chinese robber is the first to examine the dark side of the moon and finds three different layers after scanning 131 feet below the surface of the moon

  • The Chinese Yutu-2 robber was 131 feet under the moon on its dark side
  • With the help of radar, it discovered that the ‘internal architecture’ of the moon consists of three layers
  • The top consists of lunar regolite and the middle has coarser grained materials
  • The bottom layer changes between coarse and fine-grained material

The Chinese lunar lander Chang’e 4 has won the race to the dark side of the moon, allowing the country to be the first to discover its secrets.

The vessel, which landed on the moon in January 2019, deployed the Yutu-2 robber to investigate the Van Kármán crater near the south pole of the moon.

The device used a moon piercing radar to probe 131 feet below the surface to determine the “internal architecture” of the moon, which appeared to consist of three different layers.

The top consists of lunar regolite, the middle ports have coarser granular materials and larger numbers of embedded rocks and the last layer is a 130-foot thick mixture that alternates between coarse and fine-grained material, together with embedded rocks.

Researchers said the collected data information rover, along with data from the previous near-moon explorations, could help shed light on the geological history of the lunar surface.

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The top consists of lunar regolite, the middle ports have coarser granular materials and larger numbers of embedded rocks and the last layer is a 130-foot thick mixture that alternates between coarse and fine-grained material, together with embedded rocks

The top consists of lunar regolite, the middle ports have coarser granular materials and larger numbers of embedded rocks and the last layer is a 130-foot thick mixture that alternates between coarse and fine-grained material, together with embedded rocks

Since most of the knowledge about lunar regolite comes from Nasa’s Apollo and the Soviet Union missions on the near side of the moon, scientists have not yet known whether these observations would be true elsewhere on the lunar surface.

Dr. Elena Pettinelli, professor of mathematics and physics at the Roma Tre University in Italy and one of the authors of the study, told the PA news agency: Moon.

“It’s very interesting because we can see the geological sequences of these events at 40 meters very clearly [131 feet] below the surface. “

The radar revealed boulders beneath it in various sizes, along with porous, grainy material.

Yutu-2 (photo), which can climb 20 degree hills and 8 inch high obstacles, was used 12 hours later to explore the landing site. Previous landings were on the near side of the moon, facing the earth

Yutu-2 (photo), which can climb 20-degree hills and 8-inch high obstacles, was used 12 hours later to explore the landing site. Previous landings were on the near side of the moon, facing the earth

Yutu-2 (photo), which can climb 20 degree hills and 8 inch high obstacles, was used 12 hours later to explore the landing site. Previous landings were on the near side of the moon, facing the earth

China's Chang'e 4 landed on the moon in January 2019 and deployed the Yutu-2 robber to investigate the Van Kármán crater (photo) near the south pole of the moon

The Chang'e 4 of China landed on the moon in January 2019 and deployed the Yutu-2 robber to investigate the Van Kármán crater (photo) near the south pole of the moon

China’s Chang’e 4 landed on the moon in January 2019 and deployed the Yutu-2 robber to investigate the Van Kármán crater (photo) near the south pole of the moon

Researchers believe these findings are due to meteors that often hit the moon during the early days of our solar system.

The team also noted that the floor of the Von Kármán crater is a smooth sheet of chilled lava from volcanic activity that took place about 3.6 billion years ago – former astronomers believed that these areas were bodies of water, not molten lava.

The Chang’e 4 (CE-4) spacecraft landed on 3 January 2019 at the Von Karman crater.

The Yutu-2 rover, which can climb 20-degree hills and 8-inch high obstacles, was deployed 12 hours later to explore the landing site.

Previous landings were on the near side of the moon, facing the earth.

The other side, which cannot be seen because it is remote from the Earth, has often been observed from orbits, but has never been explored on the surface.

A TIME SCHEDULE OF HOW CHINA REACHES THE SIDE OF THE MOON

October 24, 2007 – China launches Chang’e-1, an unmanned satellite, in space where it will remain operational for more than a year.

October 1, 2010 – China launches Chang’e-2. This was part of the first phase of the Chinese lunar program. It was in a 100 km high moon orbit to collect data for the upcoming Chang’e-3 mission.

September 29, 2011 – China launched Tiangong 1.

September 15, 2013 – A second space lab, Tiangong 2, is being launched.

December 1, 2013 – Chang’e-3 launched.

December 14, 2013 – Chang’e-3, a 2,200 lb (1200 kg) lunar probe successfully landed on the near side of the moon. It became the first soft-land object on the moon since Luna 24 in 1976.

April 1, 2018 – Tiangong-1 crashed on Earth at 17,000 km / h and lands in the ocean off the coast of Tahiti.

May 20, 2018 – China has launched a relay satellite called Queqiao stationed in an operational orbit about 40,000 miles beyond the moon. This is designed to enable Chang’e-4 to communicate with engineers back on Earth.

December 7, 2018 – Chinese space agency announces it has launched the Chang’e-4 probe into space.

December 12, 2018 – Retro-sockets fired on the probe to stabilize and delay the spacecraft.

December 31, 2018 – The probe prepared for the very first soft landing on the other side of the moon.

Estimated for 2020 – Tiangong 3, a follow-up mission to the Tiangong-2

Before 2033 – China is planning its first unmanned reconnaissance program for Mars.

2040 – 2060 – The Asian superpower is planning a manned mission to Mars.

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