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Chinese military and North Korean regime linked to the rollout of 5G equipment across Australia

Critical components that support the rollout of the Australian 5G network are manufactured by a company that has close ties to the Chinese military and the North Korean government.

Panda Electronics Group has a joint venture in China with Swedish multinational Ericsson that supplies 5G antenna equipment to Australian telecom providers Telstra and Optus.

The company has made clandestine agreements with the North Korean regime to supply tablet computers and the rogue commercial wireless network, the Washington Post reported.

Last week, the United States Department of Defense wrote in a letter to lawmakers that the technology giant is “owned, controlled, or affiliated with the Chinese government, military, or defense industry.”

While Australia banned the world’s largest 5G builder Huawei from participating in the network rollout due to national security concerns, Chinese-made components vulnerable to foreign interference will still power next-generation technology.

Panda Electronics Group has a joint venture in China with Swedish multinational Ericsson that supplies 5G antenna equipment to Australian telecom providers Telstra and Optus

Panda Electronics Group has a joint venture in China with Swedish multinational Ericsson that supplies 5G antenna equipment to Australian telecom providers Telstra and Optus

These smaller components wouldn’t pose such a threat before the advent of 5G technology and the “Internet of Things,” security analyst Dr. John Lee of the US Studies Center told Daily Mail Australia.

“With 4G or 3G you can relatively easily protect against that technology, but under 5G it is very different,” said the former advisor to the Australian government.

“Every product that interacts in a 5G network is connected to everything else, so we are much more concerned about an antenna made in China, for example.”

The predominantly friendly trade relationship between Australia and China became particularly sour following the Australian government’s decision to ban Huawei and ZTE from participating in critical infrastructure in August 2018.

China has now begun to use its economic power as a weapon against Australia and to freeze beef and barley exports after Prime Minister Scott Morrison called for an international independent investigation into the origins of the corona virus pandemic and the role of Communist officials. Party that tried to cover the first outbreak.

A few weeks ago, it was revealed that a “sophisticated state actor,” which security experts believe is China, had carried out a large-scale cyber attack on a litany of Australian and government agencies.

“There are three types of threats when it comes to companies like Huawei involved in this type of infrastructure and the first is espionage where back doors are put into hardware and software to spy,” said Dr. Lee.

The Australia-China relationship became particularly sour due to the Australian government's decision to ban Huawei and ZTE from participating in critical infrastructure

The Australia-China relationship became particularly sour due to the Australian government's decision to ban Huawei and ZTE from participating in critical infrastructure

The Australia-China relationship became particularly sour due to the Australian government’s decision to ban Huawei and ZTE from participating in critical infrastructure

Australia banned world's largest 5G builder Huawei from participating in the 5G network rollout due to national security concerns

Australia banned world's largest 5G builder Huawei from participating in the 5G network rollout due to national security concerns

Australia banned world’s largest 5G builder Huawei from participating in the 5G network rollout due to national security concerns

The second threat is sabotage, as 5G will be connected to critical infrastructure such as power grids, water supplies and banks, so there is potential to paralyze critical services.

The third is data protection because the private domain in China doesn’t really exist. All data is accessible to the government. There are limits in our democratic system. ‘

Panda Electronics Group has strong ties to the Chinese military and is engaged in mobile satellite communications, surveillance technologies and radio fabrication.

In the store department, the company makes mobile phones, data cards, TV sets and set-top boxes.

Pictured: Chinese Communist Party members swear allegiance to the party flag in Yunnan Province

Pictured: Chinese Communist Party members swear allegiance to the party flag in Yunnan Province

Pictured: Chinese Communist Party members swear allegiance to the party flag in Yunnan Province

Chinese Ambassador to Australia Cheng Jingye has made economic threats against Australia after Prime Minister Scott Morrison called for an independent international investigation into the origins of COVID-19

Chinese Ambassador to Australia Cheng Jingye has made economic threats against Australia after Prime Minister Scott Morrison called for an independent international investigation into the origins of COVID-19

Chinese Ambassador to Australia Cheng Jingye has made economic threats against Australia after Prime Minister Scott Morrison called for an independent international investigation into the origins of COVID-19

“Not all companies are fronts for the Chinese Communist Party, but the problem is that under Chinese law, the government can compel any company to transfer information or to act in the interest of national security or intelligence. is extremely wide, ‘said Dr. Lee.

“So even if a company is not a front for the Chinese Communist Party, it can be used as a front for the Chinese Communist Party at any time.”

But the idea that Australia can easily avoid anything made in China is unrealistic, Lee says.

“This is part of a conversation we have in Australia and elsewhere about disentangling supply chains to ensure that parts and components related to critical or strategic technology do not depend solely on China,” he said.

A photo of Xi Jinping is burned by Indian protesters after a border movement against Chinese troops takes place

A photo of Xi Jinping is burned by Indian protesters after a border movement against Chinese troops takes place

A photo of Xi Jinping is burned by Indian protesters after a border movement against Chinese troops takes place

“But there is no quick fix.”

Daily Mail Australia has contacted Telstra and Optus for comment.

An Optus said it “complies with the national security regulations imposed under the security sector reforms in the telecommunications sector.”

Telstra did not respond to our request, but a spokesperson told us Sydney Morning Herald: “It worked closely with Ericsson to ensure that all components of its network were secure.

“The company also regularly worked with the government on security issues.”

How the Chinese feud with Australia has escalated

August 2018: Australia announces a ban on Huawei from participating in all critical infrastructure projects, including the rollout of the 5G network due to concerns over national security.

2019: Australian intelligence agencies conclude that China was responsible for a cyber attack on the Australian parliament and the three major political parties ahead of the May elections.

April 2020: Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison begins researching his world leaders to investigate the origins of the corona virus pandemic. Britain and France are initially reluctant, but eventually more than 100 countries support an investigation.

15 of April: Morrison Is One of the Few Leaders to Support Donald Trump’s Critique of the World Health Organization, Accusing US President of Bias Against China.

April 21: The Chinese Embassy accuses Australian Secretary of State Peter Dutton of “ignorance and bigotry” and “pursuing what those Americans have alleged” after calling on China to be more transparent about the outbreak.

April 23: Australian Agriculture Minister David Littleproud calls on G20 countries to campaign against ‘wet markets’ that are common in China and linked to early coronavirus cases.

26 April: Chinese Ambassador Cheng Jingye refers to a boycott of Australian wine and beef and says tourists and students can avoid Australia “while it is not so friendly to China”. Canberra rejects the threat and warns Beijing of “economic coercion.”

11 May: China suspends beef imports from four of Australia’s largest meat processors. These account for more than a third of Australia’s $ 1.1 billion beef exports to China.

May 18: The World Health Organization Supports Partial Investigation into the Pandemic, But China Says Australia’s “Joke” to Claim Credit. That same day, China imposes an 80 percent rate on Australian barley. Australia says it can dispute this at the WTO.

21st of May: China Announces New Rules for Iron Ore Imports, Differentiating Australian Imports – Typically $ 41 Billion Per Year – For Additional Bureaucratic Checks.

5 June: Beijing warns tourists about traveling to Australia for alleging racism and violence against the Chinese over Covid-19.

June 9: Chinese Ministry of Education cautions students to think carefully about studying in Australia, citing alleged racist incidents.

June 19th: Australia Says It Is Attacked By A Foreign State, Government Sources Say It’s China. The attack targeted industry, schools, hospitals, and government officials, Morrison says.

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