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Chinese CCTV surveillance Britons in more than 275,000 networks have been identified in five Uyghur camps

Chinese CCTV cameras monitoring Britons in more than 275,000 separate networks identified in five Uyghur internment camps

  • CCTV cameras monitoring Britons have been identified in five Uyghur camps
  • Cameras from Chinese firms Hikvision and Dahua have been monitoring detainees
  • Research identified the cameras by examining recently recorded video footage
  • The UK has created the fourth largest CCTV network by Communist Party-owned companies


Surveillance cameras made by companies tracking Britons’ movements in more than 275,000 separate networks have been identified at five Uyghur internment camps in Xinjiang, The Mail on Sunday can reveal.

The specialized CCTV cameras of the Chinese state-owned companies Hikvision and Dahua have been monitoring the prisoners in the camps.

The investigation, conducted by surveillance experts IPVM (PLS KEEP), identified the cameras by examining recently recorded video footage of a Chinese blogger from the “re-education centers” for Uyghur Muslim minorities in Xinjiang.

The cameras are tuned for low-light conditions and come with analytics such as intrusion detection, line crossing detection and area entry/exit detection, all of which can be used to detect people entering sensitive areas or prisoners trying to escape.

Both companies are blacklisted in the US for links to human rights violations, but so far the UK government has not taken any steps to impose sanctions on the companies.

It’s because the MoS can also reveal that an investigation has found that the UK has the fourth largest network in the world outside of China of CCTV cameras made by Communist Party-owned companies.

A report revealed that Britons are monitored by 277,986 networks of Hikvision and Dahua cameras, with the number of individual cameras likely to be much higher.

Surveillance cameras made by companies tracking Britons’ movements in more than 275,000 separate networks have been identified in five Uyghur internment camps in Xinjiang, The Mail on Sunday can reveal

London has the highest number with 61,504, followed by Birmingham with 8,865, Manchester with 7,436 and Liverpool with 4,957, according to TOP10VPN researchers.

Last week it was revealed that the government is using hundreds of Hikvision cameras at the Ministry of Health, the Ministry of Work and Pensions and the Ministry of Justice.

This was despite a freedom of information request from the Free Tibet campaign group which exposed the Ministry of Defense’s official warning ‘not to use/install Hikvision equipment’.

And last week, the MoS revealed that the Home Office had had a security scare after the discovery of a CCTV unit in its London headquarters manufactured by Dahua.

US authorities fear that the companies’ camera technology poses a national security problem because of their ties to the Chinese state, something the company’s bosses vehemently deny.

Hikvision and Dahua’s cameras and technology have been used in the repression of the Uyghurs from the Muslim minority in China.

Conservative MP Alicia Kearns, of the China Research Group, said: “For months I have been calling on the British government to ban Hikvision and Dahua cameras, not least to get them rid of government departments and local councils.

“This is yet another proof of why we urgently need to remove this insidious technology from our country to protect our civil liberties.

“It is unacceptable that even a cent of taxpayers’ money should go to an arm of the Chinese state, an arm that is actively facilitating the genocide of the Uyghur people in Xinjiang.”

Earlier this month, the government submitted its revised CCTV code to parliament, but it failed to include a human rights clause that blocks the purchase of equipment from companies linked to human rights violations.

Fraser Sampson, England and Wales’ Commissioner for Biometrics and Surveillance Cameras, said: “From what little they have said publicly, it seems that Hikvision would like to take a ‘fire and forget’ approach and decline any responsibility for what will be done with their systems once they’ve designed and installed them.’

Hikvision supplies CCTV cameras to UK schools, police forces, government departments, municipalities, hospitals, care homes and private companies.

Hikvision declined to comment, while Dahua did not respond to a request for comment.

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