China says it will continue to impose the ban on the use of rhino horns and tiger bones in medicine

A government spokesman said today that China will continue to ban the use of horns of rhinoceros and tiger bones in medicine in response to the convenience of the ban (file photo)

China says it will continue to impose a ban on the use of rhino horns and tiger bones in medicine

  • China eased a long-term ban in October to allow certain trade in the products
  • New regulations would legalize the use of rhinoceros and tiger parts in medicine
  • A government spokesperson said today that the implementation would be postponed
  • He stressed the use of rhino horns and tiger bones in medicine had not been legalized
  • But it remains unclear whether and when the proposed changes are implemented

Tracy You for Mailonline

China will continue to prohibit rhino horns and tiger fat from being used in medicine, according to a government spokesman.

The news came after Beijing had proposed in October to reverse a 25-year-old law to legalize the use of the two materials for medical and other purposes.

The Chinese authorities have decided to postpone the implementation of the new law, according to Huang Caiyi, the spokesperson for China's National Forestry Bureau.

A government spokesman said today that China will continue to ban the use of horns of rhinoceros and tiger bones in medicine in response to the convenience of the ban (file photo)

A government spokesman said today that China will continue to ban the use of horns of rhinoceros and tiger bones in medicine in response to the convenience of the ban (file photo)

Rhinoceros horn is primarily made from keratin - a protein found in fingernails and hair - and is thought to help in the treatment of everything from cancer to hangovers (file photo)

Rhinoceros horn is primarily made from keratin - a protein found in fingernails and hair - and is thought to help in the treatment of everything from cancer to hangovers (file photo)

Rhinoceros horn is primarily made from keratin – a protein found in fingernails and hair – and is thought to help in the treatment of everything from cancer to hangovers (file photo)

The implementation of the revised regulations was postponed once when a senior Chinese government official said last month that Beijing had a second thought about easing the ban.

According to Huang, who spoke today at a press conference, China will also continue to block the import and export of rhinos and tigers and their by-products.

Moreover, people are not allowed to sell, buy, transport, transport or book rhinos and tigers and their by-products.

Huang said the authorities had decided to suspend the lifting of the trade ban that had been proposed two months earlier, as reported by Xinhua News Agency. But he gave no reason or explained whether the decision would be permanent.

He also said that the crackdown on the illegal trade in rhinos and tigers and their by-products throughout the nation had been going on since 13 November and would last until 31 December.

& # 39; Our country is a treaty country to the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora. We have not spared any attempts to tackle the smuggling and illegal trade in wild animals, "Huang said.

In response to Huang's speech today, animal rights lawyers call on Beijing to ban the use of tiger and rhino products once and for all.

Gilbert M. Sape from World Animal Protection said: "China has a unique opportunity to show real leadership on how committed they are to the conservation and welfare of animals at the moment."

Iris Ho of Humane Society International said: "China must fully restore the 1993 ban on the sale, import and export of horn of rhinoceros and tigers to prevent further loss of rhinoceros and tigers to poachers and trafficking. We can not afford any missteps when the survival of the species is at stake. & # 39;

Conservation groups around the world have criticized China earlier because it was considering easing the ban, some of which made the new prescriptions a death sentence & # 39; for the animals called (file photo)

Conservation groups around the world have criticized China earlier because it was considering easing the ban, some of which made the new prescriptions a death sentence & # 39; for the animals called (file photo)

Conservation groups around the world have criticized China earlier because it was considering easing the ban, some of which made the new prescriptions a death sentence & # 39; for the animals called (file photo)

On October 29, the Council of State issued a circular to replace a ban on the trade in tiger bones and rhinoceros in 1993, allowing exceptions under & # 39; special circumstances & # 39 ;, including medical & research. # 39 ;.

According to the circular, horns of rhinoceroses or bones of tigers bred in captivity may be used for medical examination or clinical treatment of critical diseases.

Rhinoceroses and tigers are already under critical pressure from a black market that supplies the traditional medicine trade.

Rhinoceros horn is made primary from keratin – a protein found in fingernails and hair – and is believed to be able to help treat everything from cancer to hangovers when these are consumed.

On the other hand, it is said that tiger fat, which has been crushed and made into a paste, is useful for the treatment of various conditions, including rheumatism and back pain.

There are no proven medical benefits among people of both products, according to the National Geographic.

China banned the trade in tiger bones and rhino horns 25 years ago as part of the global effort to save the animals.

Commercial tiger nurseries are legal in China, and although the use of tiger bones in medicine was forbidden, tiger parts of farms often say in tonic or other medicines, animal rights groups say.

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