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China orders a woman working in Australia to report to the police after criticizing President Xi Jinping

A Chinese activist working in Australia must report to the police on her return home after creating a Twitter account mocking President Xi Jinping.

Wuyuan Dong Zoo was born in the city of Hefei in Anhui Province in eastern China and currently lives in Melbourne with a temporary working holiday visa.

The 30-year-old, who describes herself as a human rights activist, uses Twitter to criticize the Chinese Communist Party for hiding information from its citizens.

In June, she staged a protest in Melbourne that criticized China for censoring information about the Tiananmen Square massacre.

Wuyuan Dong Zoo was born in the city of Hefei in Anhui Province in eastern China and currently lives in Melbourne with a temporary working holiday visa

Wuyuan Dong Zoo was born in the city of Hefei in Anhui Province in eastern China and currently lives in Melbourne with a temporary working holiday visa

The demonstration also served as a memorial to whistleblower Li Wenliang – the Wuhan physician arrested for trying to warn the world about coronavirus before dying of the disease.

But Chinese officials have warned Ms. Zoo that her presence in Australia does not exempt her from Chinese laws designed to protect the government from criticism.

In a video call to the Chinese police, an officer sits with Ms. Zoo’s father, as he says, “Let me tell you, you must remember that you are a citizen of the People’s Republic of China.”

“Even though you are [in Australia], you are still governed by China’s law, you understand? ‘

The police officer warns Ms. Zoo not to speak out against President Xi Jinping and asks her to hand over her Twitter password several times.

At one point, Ms. Zoo even denies that the account is hers, but the officer demands that she “come to the police station” when she returns to China.

“Let me make it clear to you what you post on Twitter is absolutely not allowed,” he says.

In a video call to the Chinese police, an agent (photo) sits with Ms. Zoo’s father saying, “Let me tell you, you must remember that you are a citizen of the People’s Republic of China.”

Ms. Zoo (photo) hid her identity by wearing face masks and using a pseudonym until June 2

Ms. Zoo (photo) hid her identity by wearing face masks and using a pseudonym until June 2

Ms. Zoo (photo) hid her identity by wearing face masks and using a pseudonym until June 2

Twitter has been blocked in China, along with Facebook, Instagram and anything the government says could damage the nation’s image.

This also includes Winnie the Pooh after internet users compared President Xi Jinping to the sweet bear in memes.

Mrs. Zoo told it SBS that her parents are questioned by the police every week.

Although she also said she doesn’t know how the police tracked her down for hiding her identity by wearing face masks and using a pseudonym until June 2.

Although she fears for their safety, Ms. Zoo said she will not give in to the government’s scare.

Born as the only child of a professor who teaches university party theory, her relationship with her parents – who have begged her to stop speaking out against the government – has been severed.

Her father asked her to report to the Chinese authorities for her criminal activities, but Ms. Zoo said she thinks they were “brainwashed by the regime.”

“Ultimately I blame what the Chinese government has created, this control and dictatorship is really the reason our relationship has torn apart,” she said.

Pictured: Ms. Zoo during a protest she helped organize in Victoria against the death of Li Wenliang trying to warn the world about coronavirus for the first time

Pictured: Ms. Zoo during a protest she helped organize in Victoria against the death of Li Wenliang trying to warn the world about coronavirus for the first time

Pictured: Ms. Zoo during a protest she helped organize in Victoria against the death of Li Wenliang trying to warn the world about coronavirus for the first time

China has strict laws designed to fiercely protect the government's image from negative comments. In the photo: Chinese President Xi Jinping

China has strict laws designed to fiercely protect the government's image from negative comments. In the photo: Chinese President Xi Jinping

China has strict laws designed to fiercely protect the government’s image from negative comments. In the photo: Chinese President Xi Jinping

Ms. Zoo first became disillusioned with the Chinese government after using a location-blocking VPN in China to access otherwise illegal websites detailing the Tiananmen Square massacre in 1989.

The seven-week pro-democracy demonstrations in Beijing ended when military tanks and personnel entered the scene, burning vehicles and killing thousands.

The protests, first labeled a “counter-revolutionary riot,” are now referred to as “political unrest,” when called at all, in an attempt to suppress all memories of the protests.

Ms. Zoo said that what she discovered “was completely different from what we were taught at school.”

Daily Mail Australia has contacted the Chinese Embassy in Australia for comment.

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