China Military develops robotic submarines that work with artificial intelligence

The Chinese military is developing unmanned submarines in an attempt to keep up with the advanced technology of the west. The submersibles will be relatively large and inexpensive, and must be equipped with artificial intelligence technology to allow them to navigate independently (file photo)

The Chinese military is developing a fleet of new submarines that will sail through the ocean without a human crew, according to scientists involved in the project.

The submarines will be powered by Artificial Intelligence (AI), which will allow them to navigate independently and work alongside existing fleets.

Unmanned submarines will be relatively large and inexpensive compared to other military vessels, according to scientists working on the project.

It is rumored that AI submarines are equipped with diesel-electric engines to allow them to remain at sea for several months without returning to the dock.

China will use these unmanned submarines for intelligence gathering, marine mine planting and kamikaze & style attacks. in high-value targets, the scientists said.

These missions should begin in the early 2020s, they added.

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The Chinese military is developing unmanned submarines in an attempt to keep up with the advanced technology of the west. The submersibles will be relatively large and inexpensive, and must be equipped with artificial intelligence technology to allow them to navigate independently (file photo)

The Chinese military is developing unmanned submarines in an attempt to keep up with the advanced technology of the west. The submersibles will be relatively large and inexpensive, and must be equipped with artificial intelligence technology to allow them to navigate independently (file photo)

According to those familiar with the AI ​​engine submarine project, which spoke with the South China Morning Post on condition of anonymity, the machines are not intended to replace traditional submarines with human crews.

The researchers claim that the autonomous submarines will work together with the manned fleets.

The machines supposedly be able to collect information, plant marine mines and be stationed in geographical "control points" to monitor the entry of vessels.

Other possible uses of unmanned boats include use as decoys to expose the position of an enemy fleet and, if necessary, a "suicide" mission to banish a particularly valuable target.

There will be no human operators on board the machines, however, they will be able to establish contact with the ground command on a regular basis.

The submarines will be designated to complete missions independently, but they are also likely to help in larger missions along with human-navigated submarines.

China has an existing program underway, with unmanned underwater vehicles (UUVs) that are already being tested.

However, these crafts are relatively small and limited in their function.

Existing models also suffer with a relatively small range and must be deployed and collected by another ship.

The military hopes to improve the technology that drives these machines to develop larger models with diesel-electric engines capable of producing constant power for months.

According to the researchers, the next generation can also be coupled and implemented as its conventional predecessors.

Executive decisions, such as attacking an enemy ship, will continue to be made by a human operator, but these so-called "giant UUVs" will be able to make their own decisions for daily operations.

This will include navigating the ocean, changing course and depth to avoid detection, determining the difference between enemy and civilian vessels, as well as the best route to reach a destination.

China hopes that the latest military artificial intelligence developments will help the country to challenge the dominance of the West, and particularly of the USA. UU., In strategic waters such as the South China Sea and the Western Pacific Ocean.

This project is a unique branch of a much larger initiative in the country, which recently increased funding for its armed forces.

Beijing announced earlier this year that it plans to increase the military budget by almost 10 percent, raising operating funds from $ 132 billion to $ 175 billion.

The researchers claim that the autonomous submarines will work in conjunction with the manned fleets. They will collect information, plant marine mines and carry out missions & # 39; kamikaze & # 39; if necessary while working with existing fleets of conventional machines (file photo)

The researchers claim that the autonomous submarines will work in conjunction with the manned fleets. They will collect information, plant marine mines and carry out missions & # 39; kamikaze & # 39; if necessary while working with existing fleets of conventional machines (file photo)

The researchers claim that the autonomous submarines will work in conjunction with the manned fleets. They will collect information, plant marine mines and carry out missions & # 39; kamikaze & # 39; if necessary while working with existing fleets of conventional machines (file photo)

WHY ARE PEOPLE SO CONCERNED ABOUT AI?

It's a problem that worries some of the best minds in the world right now, from Bill Gates to Elon Musk.

The CEO of SpaceX and Tesla, Elon Musk, described AI as our "greatest existential threat" and compared its development as "summoning the devil".

He believes that super smart machines could use humans as pets.

Professor Stephen Hawking said it is almost a certainty that a major technological disaster will threaten humanity in the next 1,000 to 10,000 years.

They could steal jobs

More than 60 percent of people fear that robots will generate fewer jobs in the next ten years, according to a survey by YouGov 2016.

And 27 percent predict that the number of jobs "much" will decrease with previous research suggesting that workers in the administrative and service sectors will be the most affected.

In addition to representing a threat to our work, other experts believe that artificial intelligence could & # 39; & # 39; err & # 39; & # 39; and become too complex for scientists to understand.

A quarter of the respondents predicted that robots will be part of everyday life in only 11 to 20 years, and 18 percent predict that this will happen in the next decade.

They could be dishonest & # 39;

Computer professor Michael Wooldridge said AI machines could become so intricate that engineers do not fully understand how they work.

If experts do not understand how AI algorithms work, they can not predict when they will fail.

This means that driverless cars or smart robots could make unpredictable "unpredictable" decisions at critical times, which could put people at risk.

For example, artificial intelligence behind a car without a driver could choose to deviate towards pedestrians or crash against barriers instead of deciding to drive sensibly.

They could kill humanity

Some people believe that AI will completely eliminate humans.

"Eventually, I think human extinction is likely to occur, and technology will probably play a role in this," Shane Legg of DeepMind said in a recent interview.

He highlighted artificial intelligence, or AI, as the "number one risk for this century."

Musk warned that AI represents more of a threat to humanity than North Korea.

& # 39; If you do not care about the security of the AI, you should. Much more risk than North Korea, "wrote the 46-year-old man on Twitter.

"Nobody likes to be regulated, but everything (cars, planes, food, drugs, etc.) that is a danger to the public is regulated, AI should be too."

Musk has always advocated that governments and private institutions apply regulations on artificial intelligence technology.

He has argued that controls are necessary to protect machines from moving out of human control

Lin Yang, director of marine technology equipment at the Shenyang Automation Institute, China Academy of Sciences, confirmed that the largest and most complex automatic submarines are under development.

"Yes, we are doing it," he told the South China Morning Post.

Mr. Lin refused to let himself be carried away by the revelation of the exact technical details of the project, due to the sensitive nature of the work.

"It will be announced sooner or later, but not now," he added.

The main advantage of large AI submarines is that they can be produced and operated on a large scale at a relatively low cost, the sources said.

The lack of humans in Baord means that the boats are more profitable, with no need to spend money to ensure the safety, comfort and mental health of the crew.

The Automation College professor at Harbin University of Engineering, Luo Yuesheng, said the submarines would increase the pressure and expectations on the human captains facing the unmanned ships in the battle.

The submarines with AI engine would not be afraid, since they have nothing to lose.

The computers that drive the boats can learn battle tactics based on the sinking of other vessels, which makes them "a formidable opponent" in the battle, Yuesheng said.

The AI ​​technology needed for these unmanned submarines is still in its infancy and faces numerous challenges to pilot a ship independently.

The hardware must meet an exceptional standard since there will be no engineers available on the deck to repair failures with the submarines once they are at sea.

Unmanned submarine missions will probably also be limited to specific, relatively simple tasks, said Luo.

& # 39; AI will not replace humans. The situation under water can be quite sophisticated. I do not think a robot can understand or handle all the challenges, "he added.

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