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China launches attack on Australia with cartoon depicting Scott Morrison as America’s ‘yes man’

Chinese state media has launched their latest attack on Australia with a cartoon depicting Scott Morrison as America’s “yes-man.”

The cartoon, which was shared on social media by the Communist Party’s China Daily on Monday, portrayed Australia as a donkey fighting on behalf of the United States.

Accompanied by the caption “yes man to one, liar to all,” the cartoon refers to Don Quixote’s 17th-century story.

In the book, Quixote orders his servant Sancho Panza to run to a windmill because he thinks it is his enemy, despite being an imaginary enemy.

Cartoonist Luo Jie, who made the cartoon last week, shows Quixote as the US and Panza as his loyal Australian steed attacking a windmill representing China.

It comes as Mr. Morrison prepares to defend free trade by getting thousands of Australians back to work after the Corona virus crisis amid mounting tensions with China.

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Chinese state media publication China Daily has blindly depicted Australia under US orders in Beijing's latest attack on Scott Morrison's government

Chinese state media publication China Daily has blindly depicted Australia under US orders in Beijing’s latest attack on Scott Morrison’s government

US President Donald Trump and Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison on September 20.

US President Donald Trump and Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison on September 20.

US President Donald Trump and Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison on September 20.

Chinese President Xi Jinping at the Chinese People's Political Consultative Conference on Thursday. State-owned publications threaten to paralyze Australia if it continues to support the U.S. amid mounting tensions with Beijing

Chinese President Xi Jinping at the Chinese People's Political Consultative Conference on Thursday. State-owned publications threaten to paralyze Australia if it continues to support the U.S. amid mounting tensions with Beijing

Chinese President Xi Jinping at the Chinese People’s Political Consultative Conference on Thursday. State-owned publications threaten to paralyze Australia if it continues to support the U.S. amid mounting tensions with Beijing

Although he will not name China – Australia’s largest export partner – in Tuesday’s speech, he will say that Australia should look for new markets for its products.

Mr Morrison will insist that the country remain an “outward-looking” trading nation that “will not retreat into the downward spiral of protectionism.”

“On the contrary, we will continue to be part of global supply chains that can deliver the prosperity we rely on to create jobs, support income and build our businesses,” he said at the National Press Club in Canberra.

The US, meanwhile, announced on Friday that it would blacklist 33 Chinese companies because it would help Beijing spy on its minority Uighur population.

Political leaders in both the US and Australia have already done that condemned China’s efforts to adopt national security laws in Hong Kong.

US Secretary of State Mike Pompeo called it “a death blow to the high degree of autonomy” Beijing had promised the area.

Australian Foreign Minister Marise Payne has also said her government is “very concerned” with the proposals.

The controversial measure, introduced Friday on the opening day of China’s national legislative session, is vehemently opposed by pro-democracy lawmakers in semi-autonomous Hong Kong.

It follows an article in the Global Times, another Chinese state-owned company, which threatens to paralyze Australia if it continues to support US President Donald Trump in mounting tensions with Beijing.

The story published on Sunday said that China will punish Australia more severely than the US because it is less economically dependent on Australia.

A transport vehicle and an autonomous drilling rig in the Rio Tinto West Angelas iron ore mine in the Pilbara region of Western Australia. About a third of Australia's total exports go to China

A transport vehicle and an autonomous drilling rig in the Rio Tinto West Angelas iron ore mine in the Pilbara region of Western Australia. About a third of Australia's total exports go to China

A transport vehicle and an autonomous drilling rig in the Rio Tinto West Angelas iron ore mine in the Pilbara region of Western Australia. About a third of Australia’s total exports go to China

The US is the largest exporter of China market while Australia is 14th.

The article read: “China will have more room to fight back against Australia with countermeasures if Canberra supports Washington in a possible” new Cold War. ”

“It means that Australia may feel more pain than the US.”

The editorial said President Trump aimed to deflect China from his approach to the coronavirus pandemic that killed 97,000 Americans.

“The Trump administration is encouraging problems to divert its misery because of the mistreatment of the coronavirus to China,” it said.

“Other countries, like Australia, don’t have to interfere in this ridiculous political play.”

Cattle are auctioned for auction at the Roma Saleyards in Roma, Queensland. Four major beef deliveries have been suspended for export to China

Cattle are auctioned for auction at the Roma Saleyards in Roma, Queensland. Four major beef deliveries have been suspended for export to China

Cattle are auctioned for auction at the Roma Saleyards in Roma, Queensland. Four major beef deliveries have been suspended for export to China

The Global Times believes Australia is just a “lap dog” used to defend US interests, and last week claimed the US forced Canberra to request an investigation into the origin and spread of the coronavirus.

Last month, Beijing was outraged by Australia’s calls for an independent investigation into the virus’s origins, believing it was an “evil” attempt to blame and “stigmatize” China.

Mr Morrison had demanded a ban on wet wildlife markets where the virus may have originated, saying that inspectors should be allowed to enter a pandemic country without government approval.

Scott Morrison warns China ‘we won’t back off’ but warns of a trade war as he unveils a new ‘JobMaker’ plan to ‘take the Australian economy out of ICU’

Scott Morrison will reveal his plans to “ take the economy out of the ICU ” and get thousands of Australians back to work after the corona virus crisis.

In a major speech on Tuesday, the Prime Minister will outline a new ‘JobMaker plan’ consisting of five key principles to jump-start the economy after 1.3 million Australians were out of a job.

The principles are free trade, care for the country, building on Australia’s strengths, giving everyone a fair chance and creating a business-friendly environment.

With unemployment at around 10 percent and a drop in world trade and foreign investment, Morrison will say the country is facing the “most challenging environment ever outside of wartime.”

Faced with deteriorating relations with China, Mr Morrison (pictured with Chinese Prime Minister Li Keqiang) will insist that Australia remains an 'outward-looking' trading nation

Faced with deteriorating relations with China, Mr Morrison (pictured with Chinese Prime Minister Li Keqiang) will insist that Australia remains an 'outward-looking' trading nation

Faced with deteriorating relations with China, Mr Morrison (pictured with Chinese Prime Minister Li Keqiang) will insist that Australia remains an ‘outward-looking’ trading nation

But in a message of hope to thousands of companies and employees, he will refer to Australia’s recovery from previous downturns and say, “We’ve done this before and together we can do it again.”

Faced with deteriorating relations with China, which has taxed Australian barley and banned Aussie beef, Mr. Morrison will insist that the country remain an “outward-looking” trading nation.

Tensions with the communist superpower have increased dramatically since Mr. Morrison asked in April for an investigation into the origin of the virus, an action that infuriated Beijing.

“We are not retreating into the downward spiral of protectionism. On the contrary, we will continue to be part of global supply chains that can deliver the prosperity we rely on to create jobs, support income and build our businesses, ”he said at the National Press Club in Canberra.

“Our economic sovereignty will be achieved by ensuring that our industries are highly competitive, resilient and able to succeed in a global market.”

Earlier this month, China raised an 80 percent rate on Australian barley and suspended imports from four Australian beef suppliers in apparent revenge.

About a third of Australia’s total exports – including iron ore, gas, coal, and food – go to China, making about $ 135 billion a year and creating thousands of jobs.

Fears of further retaliation were sparked last week as China relaxed controls on iron ore imports in a move that could favor Australia’s competitors.

US Secretary of State Mike Pompeo said the US is “behind Australia.”

Mr Morrison has repeatedly insisted that the two countries are ‘major partners’ and that their alliance is strong.

The 33 companies that have been blacklisted by the US are accused of helping Beijing spy on the minority Uyghur population or having links with weapons of mass destruction and the Chinese military.

Seven companies and two institutions were listed as being “complicit in human rights abuses and violations in China’s campaign of repression, mass arbitrary detention, forced labor, and high-tech surveillance against Uyghurs,” and others, the Commerce Department said in a statement.

Two dozen other companies, government agencies and commercial organizations have been added to support the purchase of items for use by the Chinese military, the department said in another statement.

The blacklisted companies focus on artificial intelligence and facial recognition, markets in which US chip companies such as Nvidia Corp and Intel Corp. invest heavily.

One of the companies mentioned is NetPosa, one of China’s best-known AI companies, whose facial recognition subsidiary is linked to the surveillance of Muslims.

Mr Morrison has called for a ban on wet markets for wildlife. Pictured: Xihua Farmers' Market in Guangzhou

Mr Morrison has called for a ban on wet markets for wildlife. Pictured: Xihua Farmers' Market in Guangzhou

Mr Morrison has called for a ban on wet markets for wildlife. Pictured: Xihua Farmers’ Market in Guangzhou

Morrison said he could not rule out the possibility that the virus originated in a laboratory in Wuhan, a theory cited by the United States government. Mr. Morrison said he saw no evidence for that theory

Morrison said he could not rule out the possibility that the virus originated in a laboratory in Wuhan, a theory cited by the United States government. Mr. Morrison said he saw no evidence for that theory

Morrison said he could not rule out the possibility that the virus originated in a laboratory in Wuhan, a theory cited by the United States government. Mr. Morrison said he saw no evidence for that theory

Mr Pompeo called the proposal an attempt to ‘unilaterally and arbitrarily impose Hungarian security legislation’.

Hong Kong has blossomed as a bulwark of freedom. The United States strongly urges Beijing to revise its disastrous proposal, to abide by its international obligations, and to respect Hong Kong’s high level of autonomy, democratic institutions and civil liberties, which are essential to preserve its special status under US law, “Pompeo said in a statement.

He said the decision to ignore the will of the people of Hong Kong would be “a death knell for the high degree of autonomy Beijing had promised Hong Kong” under a decades-old agreement known as the Sino-British joint statement.

Trade Minister tells wine and cheese exporters not to give China an excuse to ban their products

The Federal Minister of Commerce has told wine and cheese exporters not to give Beijing any excuse for banning their products after beef suppliers have been blacklisted for technical problems.

The federal government has denied barley rates, and the beef ban is rewarding Australia’s demand for a coronavirus investigation – but Secretary of Commerce Simon Birmingham told Australian companies to make sure that all of their paperwork was in order for more industries could not become the target.

During an interview on May 13, Patricia Karvelas of the ABC asked him, “Australian wine and dairy producers are afraid they could be next. What reassurance do you have that this will not happen? ‘

Senator Birmingham replied, “Everyone should, as always, dot his IS and cross their Ts and leave no room for complaint.”

He said he saw no reason why the wine or cheese industry should not meet the quarantine, health, or labeling standards they must meet to export to China.

US lap dog: Chinese state media alleges Donald Trump has ‘forced’ Scott to call for coronavirus investigation and says Australia only harms its own interests

Chinese state media has alleged that the US has forced Australia to request an investigation into the origin and spread of the coronavirus.

An article in the Global Times, a state-controlled tabloid newspaper, said Australia is America’s “lap dog” and serves as a “US pawn to create problems for China.”

It suggested that President Donald Trump told Prime Minister Scott Morrison during his phone call on April 22 to ask for an investigation into the virus.

“As the White House promotes the” America First “doctrine and intensifies competition with China, Washington’s allies are increasingly required to help serve those goals,” the article said.

“What the US wants are not equal partners, but loyal followers. Forcing other countries to choose between Washington and Beijing, it is the current US government that is forcing and threatening.

Australian Secretary of State Marise Payne even announced Australia’s demands for an independent investigation on April 19, three days before Mr. Morrison spoke to President Trump.

The Prime Minister also called German Chancellor Angela Merkel and French President Emmanuel Macron on the same day as President Trump to urge them to support Australia’s pressure.

President Xi Jinping has agreed to a WHO investigation after more than 100 countries signed a demanding motion at the World Health Assembly last week.

Mr. Morrison called Mr. Trump on April 22 and later tweeted about the conversation

Mr. Morrison called Mr. Trump on April 22 and later tweeted about the conversation

Mr. Morrison called Mr. Trump on April 22 and later tweeted about the conversation

Beijing is known for pressuring exporters during political disagreements.

It includes encouraging a boycott of South Korean cars after the country deployed a US missile defense shield in 2017 and a ban on Norwegian salmon after Chinese rebel Liu Xiaobo won the Nobel Peace Prize in Oslo that same year.

“Trade must be independent of politics, but it is difficult to fully divide it into reality,” Yu told the Global Times.

Australia and China have had a free trade agreement since 2015, but some exporters are still facing difficulties because relations have soured.

In 2018, Beijing imposed new customs regulations for Australian wine, stopping shipments in Shanghai.

And last year – after Canberra deprived Chinese businessman Xiangmo Huang of his visa – major ports extended clearing times for Australian coal to at least 40 days, arguing that the delay was due to ‘normal’ security checks.

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