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China is appointed to the UN Human Rights Council despite a long track record in the field of human rights

China has been placed on the UN Human Rights Council despite a long history of human rights abuses.

The coronavirus outbreak started in China, reportedly in the “wet” livestock markets in Wuhan city.

The country has recorded 3,326 coronavirus deaths and 81,639 cases, but many speculate that this number is much higher.

Delay and deception about the origin of the outbreak took precious time – and many thousands of lives, both in China and beyond in the rest of the world.

However, Jiang Duan, Minister of the Chinese Mission in Geneva, has now been appointed to the Advisory Group of the UN Human Rights Council, where he will act as a representative of the Asian and Pacific States.

He will serve as one of the five country block representatives and will be accompanied by delegates from Spain, Slovenia and Chad.

People stand in silent tribute during a three-minute national monument to mourn martyrs who died fighting the new coronavirus disease

People stand in silent tribute during a three-minute national monument to mourn martyrs who died fighting the new coronavirus disease

The country grinds to a halt on Saturday to mourn patients and medical personnel killed by the coronavirus as the world’s most populous country observed a three-minute rural silence.

Officials said the celebration was an opportunity to mourn virus “martyrs” – a title of honor given by the government this week to 14 medical workers who died in the outbreak.

At 10 a.m., civilians paused, horns, cars, trains, and ships sounded their horns and air raid sirens in memory.

China stalled on Saturday to mourn patients and medical personnel killed by the coronavirus as the world's most populous country observed a three-minute rural silence. In the photo: people during the silence in Wuhan

China stalled on Saturday to mourn patients and medical personnel killed by the coronavirus as the world's most populous country observed a three-minute rural silence. In the photo: people during the silence in Wuhan

China stalled on Saturday to mourn patients and medical personnel killed by the coronavirus as the world’s most populous country observed a three-minute rural silence. In the photo: people during the silence in Wuhan

China has recorded 3,326 coronavirus deaths and 81,639 cases, but many speculate that this number is much higher. In the photo: a mourning in Wuhan

China has recorded 3,326 coronavirus deaths and 81,639 cases, but many speculate that this number is much higher. In the photo: a mourning in Wuhan

China has recorded 3,326 coronavirus deaths and 81,639 cases, but many speculate that this number is much higher. In the photo: a mourning in Wuhan

National flags were lowered to half-mast across the country, including in Tiananmen Square in the capital. Pictured: a flag at half-mast in Haikou

National flags were lowered to half-mast across the country, including in Tiananmen Square in the capital. Pictured: a flag at half-mast in Haikou

National flags were lowered to half-mast across the country, including in Tiananmen Square in the capital. Pictured: a flag at half-mast in Haikou

In Wuhan – the city where the virus first appeared at the end of last year – sirens and horns sounded while people were silent on the street.

Tongji hospital staff stood outside with their heads bowed to the main building, some in the protective hazmat suits that have become a symbol of the crisis worldwide.

Xu, a nurse in Tongji who worked on the front line and treated coronavirus patients, said, “I hope they can rest well in heaven.”

Workers in protective clothing stopped next to the barriers in one residential community – a reminder that there are still severe restrictions on daily life in Wuhan.

State media showed Chinese President Xi Jinping and other officials in front of a Beijing government building with white flowers.

At 10 a.m., civilians paused, horns, cars, trains, and ships sounded their horns and air raid sirens in memory. Pictured: drivers ring their horns in Wuhan

At 10 a.m., civilians paused, horns, cars, trains, and ships sounded their horns and air raid sirens in memory. Pictured: drivers ring their horns in Wuhan

At 10 a.m., civilians paused, horns, cars, trains, and ships sounded their horns and air raid sirens in memory. Pictured: drivers ring their horns in Wuhan

Police officers were silent and bowed their heads while standing on a road in Nanjing. The three-minute silence was to commemorate the “martyrs” of the coronavirus

Health workers were silent in Fuzhou's first hospital during the three-minute rural silence to commemorate the victims of the coronavirus

Health workers were silent in Fuzhou's first hospital during the three-minute rural silence to commemorate the victims of the coronavirus

Health workers were silent in Fuzhou’s first hospital during the three-minute rural silence to commemorate the victims of the coronavirus

Officials said the celebration was an opportunity to mourn virus “martyrs” – a title of honor given by the government this week to 14 medical workers who died in the outbreak. In the photo: a mourner in Tiananmen Square in Beijing

National flags were lowered to half-mast across the country, including in Tiananmen Square in the capital.

Pedestrians on one of the busiest shopping streets in the city stopped walking and kept their heads low in silence as the police stood by the side of the road with their riot shields down and heads bowed.

Shopper Wang Yongna said, “During this process, many people, including the medical workers … made extraordinary contributions. They are all heroes. ‘

The doctors called “martyrs” included Dr. Li Wenliang, a whistleblower in Wuhan who was reprimanded by authorities for trying to warn others in the early days of the infection. Pictured: Chinese railway workers and travelers wear protective masks while bowing their heads at Beijing Railway Station

Chinese police officers at Beijing Railway Station wear protective masks while observing three minutes of silence

Chinese police officers at Beijing Railway Station wear protective masks while observing three minutes of silence

Chinese police officers at Beijing Railway Station wear protective masks while observing three minutes of silence

The hashtag 'China remembers its heroes' reached nearly 1.3 billion views on the Twitter-like Weibo platform on Saturday. Pictured: Mourners visit flower tribute at Heroes Memorial Monument in Wuhan

The hashtag 'China remembers its heroes' reached nearly 1.3 billion views on the Twitter-like Weibo platform on Saturday. Pictured: Mourners visit flower tribute at Heroes Memorial Monument in Wuhan

The hashtag ‘China remembers its heroes’ reached nearly 1.3 billion views on the Twitter-like Weibo platform on Saturday. Pictured: Mourners visit flower tribute at Heroes Memorial Monument in Wuhan

Saturday's commemoration coincided with the annual Qing Ming Holiday - the 'Grave Sweeping' Festival - when the Chinese visit family members' graves and leave the offer in memory. Pictured: medical workers check the temperature of a car driver in Beijing

Saturday's commemoration coincided with the annual Qing Ming Holiday - the 'Grave Sweeping' Festival - when the Chinese visit family members' graves and leave the offer in memory. Pictured: medical workers check the temperature of a car driver in Beijing

Saturday’s commemoration coincided with the annual Qing Ming Holiday – the ‘Grave Sweeping’ Festival – when the Chinese visit family members’ graves and leave the offer in memory. Pictured: medical workers check the temperature of a car driver in Beijing

Although China claims to have curbed the spread of the virus, some restrictions were tightened again this week to prevent a second wave of infections. Pictured: A medical worker in Beijing tests a driver's temperature outside a cemetery

Although China claims to have curbed the spread of the virus, some restrictions were tightened again this week to prevent a second wave of infections. Pictured: A medical worker in Beijing tests a driver's temperature outside a cemetery

Although China claims to have curbed the spread of the virus, some restrictions were tightened again this week to prevent a second wave of infections. Pictured: A medical worker in Beijing tests a driver’s temperature outside a cemetery

The death of Dr. Li by the coronavirus in February caused a national outpouring of grief and anger at the government's approach to the crisis. Pictured: medical personnel observe the rural silence in Beijing

The death of Dr. Li by the Corona virus in February caused a national outpouring of grief and anger at the government's approach to the crisis. Pictured: medical personnel observe the rural silence in Beijing

The death of Dr. Li by the coronavirus in February caused a national outpouring of grief and anger at the government’s approach to the crisis. Pictured: medical personnel observe the rural silence in Beijing

The ruling Communist Party has tried to direct criticism of the local authorities in Wuhan and surrounding Hubei province, who have been accused in the beginning of downplaying the severity of the virus. Pictured: People play tribute in Shanghai

The ruling Communist Party has tried to direct criticism of the local authorities in Wuhan and surrounding Hubei province, who have been accused in the beginning of downplaying the severity of the virus. Pictured: People play tribute in Shanghai

The ruling Communist Party has tried to direct criticism of the local authorities in Wuhan and surrounding Hubei province, who have been accused in the beginning of downplaying the severity of the virus. Pictured: People play tribute in Shanghai

Parkgoers also paused their activities, some with their hands in prayer.

Trains on Beijing’s metro network also stalled.

The hashtag ‘China remembers its heroes’ reached nearly 1.3 billion views on the Twitter-like Weibo platform on Saturday.

The doctors called “martyrs” included Dr. Li Wenliang, a whistleblower in Wuhan who was reprimanded by authorities for trying to warn others in the early days of the infection.

A flag flies at half mast in Zhengzhou as China came to a halt for three minutes of silence to remember medics who died fighting the corona virus

A flag flies at half mast in Zhengzhou as China came to a halt for three minutes of silence to remember medics who died fighting the corona virus

A flag flies at half mast in Zhengzhou as China came to a halt for three minutes of silence to remember medics who died fighting the corona virus

Workers at Wuhan's Leishenshan Hospital pay tribute to physicians who died fighting the deadly coronavirus outbreak

Workers at Wuhan's Leishenshan Hospital pay tribute to physicians who died fighting the deadly coronavirus outbreak

Workers at Wuhan’s Leishenshan Hospital pay tribute to physicians who died fighting the deadly coronavirus outbreak

Li’s death from coronavirus in February sparked a national outpouring of grief and anger at the government’s approach to the crisis.

The ruling Communist Party has tried to direct criticism of the local authorities in Wuhan and surrounding Hubei province, who have been accused in the beginning of downplaying the severity of the virus.

Despite drastic measures to shut down the province in late January, the epidemic culminated in a global pandemic with more than a million cases.

Some restrictions in Hubei have eased in recent weeks after the officially reported number of new infections dropped to almost zero.

China today reported a new confirmed case in Wuhan and 18 among people who came from abroad, along with four new deaths, all in Wuhan. Pictured: workers perceive a moment of silence in Shaoyang

China today reported a new confirmed case in Wuhan and 18 among people who came from abroad, along with four new deaths, all in Wuhan. Pictured: workers perceive a moment of silence in Shaoyang

China today reported a new confirmed case in Wuhan and 18 among people who came from abroad, along with four new deaths, all in Wuhan. Pictured: workers perceive a moment of silence in Shaoyang

Saturday’s commemoration coincided with the annual Qing Ming Holiday – the ‘Grave Sweeping’ Festival – when the Chinese visit family members’ graves and leave the offer in memory.

Although China claims to have curbed the spread of the virus, some restrictions were tightened again this week to prevent a second wave of infections.

The authorities have advised against visiting cemeteries on the occasion of the festival.

Last year, nearly ten million people visited cemeteries during the three-day vacation, according to state news agency Xinhua.

At the huge Babaoshan Cemetery in Beijing, mourners had to make an online reservation to visit a grave in a limited number of time slots, with only three family members allowed per grave.

Health workers attending national mourning moment are moved by residents as they are transported by bus in Wuhan

Health workers attending national mourning moment are moved by residents as they are transported by bus in Wuhan

Health workers attending national mourning moment are moved by residents as they are transported by bus in Wuhan

Traffic agents create a roadblock by standing in the rural three-minute silence over lanes in Wuhan

Traffic agents create a roadblock by standing in the rural three-minute silence over lanes in Wuhan

Traffic agents create a roadblock by standing in the rural three-minute silence over lanes in Wuhan

No one entered or left the Biandanshan cemetery in Wuhan on Saturday afternoon, and the security guards stood at the gate.

Some residents burned paper money on the street on Friday, the eve of the festival.

A 50-year-old Wuhan resident with the surname Li said, “We can only stay at home, we can’t go to the graves. We can only remember our family members at home. ‘

Cemeteries across China offer a ‘cloud tomb-sweeping’ service where families can honor their ancestors by watching a live stream of graveyard personnel watch the graves on their behalf.

Websites also offer people the opportunity to pay their respects to a ‘virtual’ tomb, including by lighting a digital candle and leaving a bowl of digital fruit.

China today reported a new confirmed case in Wuhan and 18 among people who came from abroad, along with four new deaths, all in Wuhan.

China has now recorded a total of 81,639 cases and 3,326 deaths, although these numbers are generally considered too low due to a lack of testing and a reluctance to report the magnitude of the original outbreak.

China has now registered a total of 81,639 cases and 3,326 deaths, although those numbers are generally considered too low due to a lack of testing and a reluctance to report the magnitude of the original outbreak. Pictured: Railway workers pay tribute to Beijing Railway Station today

China has now registered a total of 81,639 cases and 3,326 deaths, although those numbers are generally considered too low due to a lack of testing and a reluctance to report the magnitude of the original outbreak. Pictured: Railway workers pay tribute to Beijing Railway Station today

China has now registered a total of 81,639 cases and 3,326 deaths, although those numbers are generally considered too low due to a lack of testing and a reluctance to report the magnitude of the original outbreak. Pictured: Railway workers pay tribute to Beijing Railway Station today

Delivery drivers stand between their packages observing a moment of silence to remind those who died of the coronavirus

Delivery drivers stand between their packages observing a moment of silence to remind those who died of the coronavirus

Delivery drivers stand between their packages observing a moment of silence to remind those who died of the coronavirus

China's slow, cautious emergence from the global pandemic is due to the US struggling to cope with an outbreak that has claimed more than 1,860 lives in New York City alone. In the photo: a mourner in a park in Changsha

China's slow, cautious emergence from the global pandemic is due to the US struggling to cope with an outbreak that has claimed more than 1,860 lives in New York City alone. In the photo: a mourner in a park in Changsha

China’s slow, cautious emergence from the global pandemic is due to the US struggling to cope with an outbreak that has claimed more than 1,860 lives in New York City alone. In the photo: a mourner in a park in Changsha

People bow their heads in Wuhan remembering the national “martyrs” who died from the corona virus

Doctors in Wuhan, wearing masks and protective hairnets, mourn the deaths of medical workers who died fighting the deadly corona virus

Doctors in Wuhan, wearing masks and protective hairnets, mourn the deaths of medical workers who died fighting the deadly corona virus

Doctors in Wuhan, wearing masks and protective hairnets, mourn the deaths of medical workers who died fighting the deadly corona virus

People who wear protective face masks stop and pay tribute to those who lost their lives to Beijing's corona virus

People who wear protective face masks stop and pay tribute to those who lost their lives to Beijing's corona virus

People who wear protective face masks stop and pay tribute to those who lost their lives to Beijing’s corona virus

China’s slow, cautious rise due to the global pandemic is because the US is struggling to cope with an outbreak that has claimed more than 1,860 lives in New York City alone.

The hard-hit European countries of Italy, Spain and France are also seeing an increasing number of cases and deaths, although strict social distance measures such as those adopted by China seem to be having an effect.

The State Council, the Chinese cabinet, has ordered that national flags be raised by half personnel across the country and by Chinese embassies and consulates abroad, and that all public recreational activities be suspended.

The horns of cars, trains and ships joined what China’s official Xinhua News Agency called a “wail” for three minutes.

China has held such moments of silence in the past, often on the occasion of World War II

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